I have some use case where classes are inherited. In base class I have created logger object

import logging

class abc():
   logging.basicConfig(filename=r"D:\logger.txt",format="%(asctime)s %(message)s",filemode="w")
   abcd=logging.getLogger()
   abcd.setLevel(logging.INFO)

and in derived class I tried to use the same object

from test import abc
import logging
class pqr(abc):
  p=logging.getLogger('abcd')
  p.setLevel(logging.INFO)

  def you(self):
    self.p("Ad")

 obj=pqr()
 obj.you()

but I am getting this:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "d:\Test\test2.py", line 9, in <module>
obj.you()
 File "d:\Test\test2.py", line 7, in you
self.p("Ad")
TypeError: 'Logger' object is not callable
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what you're trying to accomplish with this code. You've provided three pieces, but included some disconnected components. Let's review at the pieces:

class abc():
   logging.basicConfig(filename=r"D:\logger.txt",
                       format="%(asctime)s %(message)s",
                       filemode="w")
   abcd=logging.getLogger()
   abcd.setLevel(logging.INFO)

You've set up a class abc, initialized the logging1 configuration, and created a class attribute abcd ... which you don't refer to in your later code, so I'm not sure why it's in your posting.

class pqr(abc):
  p=logging.getLogger('abcd')
  p.setLevel(logging.INFO)

You derive a class pqr from your previous class. Then you instantiate a new logger labeled "abcd", make it a class attribute, and set its reporting level. *Note that this is a new logger, not the one you created in abc.

We're fine so far. However ...

# In pqr:
    def you(self):
        self.p("Ad")

# Main
obj=pqr()
obj.you()

obj.p (the self.p in method you) is the pqr class logger. You've tried to call the logger object as a whole. It's not a method or function; it's an entire logger object. If you're expecting to log something, you have to call an appropriate method, such as self.p.info(<your message>).

  • got it @Prune.It was really helpful – A.Randive Oct 11 at 19:08

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