This question has been completely re-written 10/17/18

In order to have a "Edit Versioning System" (similar to StackOverflow's in functionality) I have configured the following classes:

tags = db.Table(
    "tags",
    db.Column("tag_id", db.Integer, db.ForeignKey("tag.id")),
    db.Column("post_version_id", db.Integer,
        db.ForeignKey("post_version.id"))
    )

class Tag(db.Model):
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    tag = db.Column(db.String(128), index=True, unique=True)

class Post(db.Model):
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    head_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey("post_version.id"))

class PostVersion(db.Model):
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    previous_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey("post_version.id"), default=None)
    pointer_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey("annotation.id"))
    current = db.Column(db.Boolean, index=True)
    tags = db.relationship("Tag", secondary=tags)

Excluded are irrelevant columns like the content of the post, etc. In fact, the real data model is annotations; I have simplified these models for generality

The actual data consists of 136 Post's variably tagged and variably versioned through edits; that is to say: I generated 136 Post's. I have 15 Tag's. The initial 136 Post's were all tagged consistently with 2 Tag's. I subsequently tagged Post's variably with different tags (using my edit system; so that there are multiple PostVersion's for the edited Post's).

As you will probably notice, there is a circular reference between Post and PostVersion; I use this to configure the following two relationships for experimentation purposes:

Relationship 1 posts

posts = db.relationship("Post",
    secondary="join(tags, PostVersion,"
        "tags.c.post_version_id==PostVersion.id)",
    primaryjoin="Tag.id==tags.c.tag_id",
    secondaryjoin="Post.head_id==PostVersion.id",
    lazy="dynamic")

which is based on the SQL statement

SELECT
    post.id
FROM
    tag
JOIN
    tags ON tag.id=tags.tag_id
JOIN
    post_version ON tags.post_version_id=post_version.id
JOIN
    post ON post.head_id=post_version.id
WHERE
    tag.id=<tag_id>

and

Relationship 2 posts2

posts2 = db.relationship("Post",
    secondary="join(tags, PostVersion,"
    "and_(tags.c.post_version_id==PostVersion.id,"
    "AnnotationVersion.current==True))",
    primaryjoin="Tag.id==tags.c.tag_id",
    secondaryjoin="PostVersion.pointer_id==Post.id",
    lazy="dynamic")

based on the SQL statement

SELECT
    annotation.id
FROM
    tag
JOIN
    tags ON tag.id=tags.tag_id
JOIN
    annotation_version ON tags.annotation_version_id=annotation_version.id AND 
    annotation_version.current=1
JOIN
    annotation ON annotation_version.pointer_id = annotation.id
WHERE
    tag_id=8;

This produces the following data:

Tag         Actual      len(t.posts.all())  len(t.posts.paginate(1,5,False).items)
t1          0           0                   0
t2          1           136                 5
t3          1           136                 5
t8          136         136                 1
t14         136         136                 1
t15         24          136                 1

Tag         Actual      t.posts.count()     t.posts2.count()
t1          0           0                   0
t2          1           136                 163
t3          1           136                 163
t8          136         22168               26569
t14         136         22168               26569
t15         24          3264                3912

I have excluded redundant tags (i.e., all the other Tag's with 0 Post's) and identical data (i.e., results from posts2 that were the same as for posts).

As you can see there are some serious problems with the results! Especially when, for both relationships, if lazy="dynamic" is turned off, the correct Post's are always returned.

Using echo=True in creating the engine, @IljaEverilä discovered that lazy="dynamic" changes the SQL. I quote from the comments in this question:

In a nutshell: with lazy="dynamic" you get FROM post, tags, post_version WHERE ..., but without you get FROM post, tags JOIN post_version ON tags.post_version_id = post_version.id WHERE .... As you can see your composite secondary is pretty much ignored with the dynamic setting. Now the question is "why?"


My question:

1. Is this a bug?

2. What can I do to rectify this predicament?


Update:

It seems lazy="dynamic" is explicitly discouraged here but no alternative is suggested. What is the alternative to still allow for pagination and count on large collections? The default does not allow for this (or at least, in the way I access it) and the documentation doesn't seem to clarify the problem! In the section titled What kind of loading to use? the loading strategy it seems to recommend for large collections is lazy="subquery" but this does not allow for paginate() and count().

  • There seems to be something funny about lazy="dynamic". Without it the relationship produces the correct query and the counts match. With it the produced query does not use your composite secondary (the join) and so the query ends up doing an implicit cross join – hence the extra rows. t.posts.all() hides the fact due to the way SQLAlchemy deduplicates single model entity results. – Ilja Everilä Oct 16 at 17:36
  • @IljaEverilä It's certainly much faster for returning all of the annotations. But it would eliminate the use of paginate() and count() (I'm curious though, when I read you carefully at "produces the correct query and the counts match." because the only way I knew of to count the results sans lazy="dynamic" would be to use len(). Is this what you mean or are you using some other method? reading up on lazy params now – malan Oct 16 at 17:49
  • 1
    In a nutshell: with lazy="dynamic" you get FROM post, tags, post_version WHERE ..., but without you get FROM post, tags JOIN post_version ON tags.post_version_id = post_version.id WHERE .... As you can see your composite secondary is pretty much ignored with the dynamic setting. Now the question is "why?" – Ilja Everilä Oct 16 at 17:53
  • 1
    lazy="join" uses LEFT JOIN by default, but you can override with innerjoin=True (it defaults to False). This on the other hand is a bit tangential to your current dilemma :). – Ilja Everilä Oct 16 at 18:02
  • 1
    I'm using echo=True when creating the engine, so emitted SQL is logged. – Ilja Everilä Oct 16 at 18:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This was indeed an issue in how SQLAlchemy handles forming the query for dynamic loading relationships. While the query should've been

SELECT post.id AS post_id, post.head_id AS post_head_id 
FROM post, tags JOIN post_version ON tags.post_version_id = post_version.id 
WHERE ? = tags.tag_id AND post.head_id = post_version.id

it ended up as

SELECT post.id AS post_id, post.head_id AS post_head_id 
FROM post, tags, post_version
WHERE ? = tags.tag_id AND post.head_id = post_version.id

So while there is an inner join between post and post_version (in pre SQL-92 style), the inner join between tags and post_version is missing and so there is a CROSS JOIN between tags and the rest. The result is that the query loads all current post versions, regardless of tag(s), since every post is joined with every row from tags. This also explains the multiplication of t.posts.count().

The solution is to wait for the fix, and in the meantime use some other relationship loading strategy.

  • Thank you Ilja for filing the bug report. I read the requirements for doing just that and didn't want to open a BitBucket account. – malan Oct 17 at 17:32

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