I am using OpenGL library in my Visual C++ application where I want to draw say, 100 points in random locations and I would like to check if these points random co-ordinates or random locations that generated are within the screen or window boundaries. I tired using a (x,y,z) vertex option and I get the points vertical running along a line. If I try generating only (x,y) and drawing them then I do get a lot more points scattered but definitely not all 100 within the window dimensions.

my code looks something like this:

GLfloat dots_vert[99];
for (int i = 0; i < 99; i++){

if (i % 2 == 0)
    dots_vert[i] = 0.0f;

else
    dots_vert[i] = ((GLfloat)rand() / (GLfloat)RAND_MAX)*100.0f - (100.0f / 2);
}


glEnable(GL_POINT_SMOOTH);
glPointSize(3.0f);
glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);

GLuint vbo_ID;
glGenBuffers(1, &vbo_ID);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, vbo_ID);
glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(dots_vert), dots_vert, GL_DYNAMIC_DRAW);
while (!GetAsyncKeyState(VK_DOWN)){
glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, vbo_ID);
glVertexAttribPointer(
    0,                  
    3,                  
    GL_FLOAT,           
    GL_FALSE,           
    0,                  
    (void*)0            
    );
glDrawArrays(GL_POINTS, 0, 100);
SwapBuffers(g_pOpenGLWindow->hDC);
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Let me guide you through the glaring mistakes I can immediately see in that code.

First of all the obvious first mistake: you claim to be drawing 100 points but your dots_vert array is only 99 elements long. This is repeated in the following loop, where you go from 0 to 98 for a total of 99 times.

So first of all:

GLfloat dots_vert[100];
for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
{
    [...]
}

There is another huge mistake in there but we'll keep that for later, let's move on for now.

The second mistake is about the knowledge of the OpenGL API and computer graphics. First of all, your goal is to pass points to the GPU, so you need the glVertexAttribPointer function, that much you figured out. The absolute first thing you wanna do is to look at the glVertexAttribPointer reference documentation, so you have an idea of what you need. You need an index, a size, a type, a normalized flag, a stride and an offset.

Let's look at what the reference documentation says about the size parameter:

size

Specifies the number of components per generic vertex attribute. Must be 1, 2, 3, 4. Additionally, the symbolic constant GL_BGRA is accepted by glVertexAttribPointer. The initial value is 4.

This is immediately obvious to be crucial in determining what kind of data you're trying to pass to the GPU. You set the parameter to 3, which means that you have an x, a y and a z. But the previous code contradicts this. For starters, your dots_vert array is 100 elements long, and you want to draw 100 points, so you have enough for 100/100 = 1 component per point, not 3. But even worse, the inside of the for loop contradicts this even further, so let's go back and check the mistake I mentioned previously.

Mistake number three: your for loop consists of an if {} else {} statement, where you set the current element of the dots_vert array to a value of 0.0f if the index of the loop is even (if (i % 2 == 0)), and a random value between -50.0f and 50.0f otherwise. Assuming 1 component per point, this means that you're only generating the x coordinates, so you're working in a single dimension.

Clearly this is not what you intended to do, also because half of your points will be 0.0f and therefore they'll all overlap. So I assume you were trying to generate a random value for x and y, and set z to 0.0f, which would make much more sense. First of all, you have 3 components per point and therefore you'll need an array with 100*3 = 300 elements. So first of all, let's fix the previous code:

GLfloat dots_vert[300];
for (int i = 0; i < 300; ++i)
{
    [...]
}

Much better. Now we need to generate a random x and y valye for each point, and set z to 0.0f since we don't need it. You wanna do all of the components at once in a single loop, so you want your loop to step by 3, not 1, so once again let's fix the previous code:

GLfloat dots_vert[300];
for (int i = 0; i < 300; i += 3)
{
    [...]
}

Now we can generate x, y and z together in a single loop. This is the crucial part where understanding how computer graphics work, specifically in the context of the OpenGL API. OpenGL uses a coordinate system where the origin is in the middle of the screen, the x axis moves horizontally (positive x points to your right), the y axis moves vertically (positive y points up), and the z axis goes straight through the screen (positive z points out of the screen, towards you). Now this is the very important part: x, y and z are clipped to a specific range of values; anything outside of this range is ignored. For all coordinates, the range goes from -1.0f to 1.0f. Anything below of above that is not drawn at all.

So if you want to have 100 points to be inside the screen, ignoring projection which is outside of the scope of this exercise, you want to generate x and y in the -1.0f to 1.0f range, not -50.0f to 50.0f like you're doing there. You can keep z to 0.0f, doesn't really matter in this case. This is why most of your points fall outside of the screen: with that range, statistically speaking, around 98% of your points will fall outside of the clip space and will be ignored.

So ultimately this is what you want:

GLfloat dots_vert[300];
for (int i = 0; i < 300; i += 3)
{
    dots_vert[i] = ((GLfloat)rand() / (GLfloat)RAND_MAX)*2.0f - 1.0f; // this is x
    dots_vert[i+1] = ((GLfloat)rand() / (GLfloat)RAND_MAX)*2.0f - 1.0f; // this is y
    dots_vert[i+2] = 0.0f; // this is z
}

Finally a reminder: when you do glDrawArrays(GL_POINTS, 0, 100); you're telling the GPU to draw 100 points. Each point is made of however many components you specified in the size parameter of the glVertexAttribPointer function. In this case you wanna draw 100 points, each point is made of 3 components, so the GPU expects an array of 100*3 = 300 floats. numbers. Anything less could result in either a segmentation fault or even worse an undefined behavior (which means anything can happen), so pay close attention to what you're doing and make sure you know exactly what kind of data you're passing to the GPU because you might end up with a nonsense result and you'll be stuck trying to figure out what went wrong. In this case, you have basically no code at all to check so it's easy to fix, but when you'll end up with a decent amount of code (and you will eventually), an error like this could mean hours or even days wasted trying to find the error.

As a bonus, feel free to ignore this one: technically a point is made of 4 components. This component is called w and its use is outside of the scope of this exercise so don't worry about it, just remember that it should always be set to 1.0f, unless you are doing projection.

So technically you could do this too:

GLfloat dots_vert[400];
for (int i = 0; i < 400; i += 4)
{
    dots_vert[i] = ((GLfloat)rand() / (GLfloat)RAND_MAX)*2.0f - 1.0f; // this is x
    dots_vert[i+1] = ((GLfloat)rand() / (GLfloat)RAND_MAX)*2.0f - 1.0f; // this is y
    dots_vert[i+2] = 0.0f; // this is z
    dots_vert[i+3] = 1.0f; // this is w
}

Then you set the size parameter of glVertexAttribPointer to 4 instead of 3, the result should be exactly the same.

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  • Thank you Cyber Niki. Would you be able to answer the next part of this question where I show the points or triangles and then a region of those points need to move in a specified orientation and speed but within that region for a duration. stackoverflow.com/questions/52544464/… – DarthKnight 2 days ago

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