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I want to write a function that'll give the user a key for an encryption code using all 26 letters of the alphabet based on the phrase they input, i.e., if the user were to type in "PYTHON", the output would look like "PYTHONABCDEFGIJKLMQRSUVWXYZ". How would I go about doing this?

3
  • What is the overall goal here? Are you looking for industry-standard encryption or is it a toy program?
    – roganjosh
    Oct 11 '18 at 20:39
  • @roganjosh my guess is toy. The "encrypted" string seems to be ${USER_INPUT} + ${ALPHABET - LETTERS_IN_USER_INPUT}....
    – PeS
    Oct 11 '18 at 22:18
  • @Pes The expected output here is a mixed alphabet key string to be used for a simple substitution cipher.
    – PM 2Ring
    Oct 11 '18 at 22:33
0

There are various ways to do this. You need to handle any duplicated letters in the pass phrase, although that's not an issue for the passphrase "PYTHON". You should also ignore any spaces in the pass phrase.

In this code, I use a set so that duplicated letters in the pass phrase are ignored and that other letters in the alphabet don't get added to the key if they're in the pass phrase.

from string import ascii_uppercase

pass_phrase = 'PYTHON'
used = {' ', '\n'}
key = []
for c in pass_phrase.upper() + ascii_uppercase:
    if c not in used:
        key.append(c)
        used.add(c)
key = ''.join(key)
print(key)

output

PYTHONABCDEFGIJKLMQRSUVWXZ

This code converts the pass phrase to upper case, but you may not like the way it handles non-letter characters (apart from space & newline) in the pass phrase. ;)


Here's one way that you can use the key to encode and decode.

encode = {u: v for u, v in zip(ascii_uppercase, key)}
decode = {v: u for u, v in zip(ascii_uppercase, key)}

src = 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.'
out = ''.join([encode.get(c, c) for c in src.upper()])
print(out)
decoded = ''.join([decode.get(c, c) for c in out.upper()])
print(decoded)

output

QAO KRBTD YLIUG NIV CRFJM ISOL QAO EPXW HI1.
THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUMPS OVER THE LAZY DOG.

The encoding and decoding routines pass through non-letter characters unchanged by using .get(c, c).

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