I am confused how delegation works in Kotlin. Wikipedia says:

With language-level support for delegation, this is done implicitly by having self in the delegate refer to the original (sending) object, not the delegate (receiving object).

Given the following Code:

interface BaseInterface {
    fun print()
}

open class Base() : BaseInterface {
    override fun print() { println(this) }
}

class Forwarded()  {
    private val base = Base()

    fun print() { base.print() }
}

class Inherited() : Base() {}

class Delegated(delegate: BaseInterface) : BaseInterface by delegate

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    print("Forwarded: ")
    Forwarded().print();
    print("Inherited: ")
    Inherited().print();
    print("Delegated: ")
    Delegated(Base()).print();
}

I get this output:

Forwarded: Base@7440e464
Inherited: Inherited@49476842
Delegated: Base@78308db1

I'd expect Delegated to return Delegated because self/this should refer to the original object. Do I get it wrong or is Kotlins delegation different?

  • I don't think the Wikipedia article means Kotlin with that paragraph (it also existed before there was a Kotlin example). Not sure what language does this but Kotlin does not. – zapl Oct 12 at 7:08
  • I just found further clarification in this Wikipedia article. Seems that I did confound the Pattern (from the first, not so clear Wiki article) with the programming concept (this article). So Kotlin does not implement the programming concept of delegation but rather the concept of forwarding. – Philippe Oct 12 at 8:29
  • Check my answer where I clarified this topic. – Adam Arold Oct 12 at 11:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Kotlin delegation is very simple - it generates all interface methods and implicitly invokes it on delegated object, except for methods explicitly overriden by the user.

Your example is functionally the same as:

class Delegated(delegate: BaseInterface) : BaseInterface{
    // when generating bytecode kotlin assigns delegate object to internal final variable
    // that is not visible at compile time
    private val d = delegate

    override fun print(){
        d.print()
    }
}

So it's pretty clear why it prints Base.

I think this is easiest to understand if we look at the decompiled Java bytecode this gets compiled into:

You can do this by going to Tools > Kotlin > Show Kotlin Bytecode and then clicking Decompile

public final class Delegated implements BaseInterface {
   // $FF: synthetic field
   private final BaseInterface $$delegate_0;

   public Delegated(@NotNull BaseInterface delegate) {
      Intrinsics.checkParameterIsNotNull(delegate, "delegate");
      super();
      this.$$delegate_0 = delegate;
   }

   public void print() {
      this.$$delegate_0.print();
   }
}

So when you do interface delegation what happens is that Kotlin creates field for the delegate named $$delegate_0 and adds methods in your delegating class which will operate on $$delegate_0. You can have multiple delegates as well, they will get their own fields. There is one caveat though: you can't access $$delegate_0 directly, not even if you make it a var like this:

class Delegated(var delegate: BaseInterface) : BaseInterface by delegate

This will compile to:

public final class Delegated implements BaseInterface {
   @NotNull
   private BaseInterface delegate;
   // $FF: synthetic field
   private final BaseInterface $$delegate_0;

   @NotNull
   public final BaseInterface getDelegate() {
      return this.delegate;
   }

   public final void setDelegate(@NotNull BaseInterface var1) {
      Intrinsics.checkParameterIsNotNull(var1, "<set-?>");
      this.delegate = var1;
   }

   public Delegated(@NotNull BaseInterface delegate) {
      Intrinsics.checkParameterIsNotNull(delegate, "delegate");
      super();
      this.$$delegate_0 = delegate;
      this.delegate = delegate;
   }

   public void print() {
      this.$$delegate_0.print();
   }
}

sadly. I've written about this topic here.

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