I have a table like this:

id     |   diameter
___________________
100    |     5.0             
101    |     5.0                      
102    |     3.0             
103    |     3.0         
104    |     3.0         
105    |     6.0       
106    |     6.0

 

SELECT a.* FROM tableX AS a WHERE a.diameter <> ( SELECT TOP 1 b.diameter FROM tableX AS b WHERE a.id > b.id ORDER BY b.id )             

I need the query to show me the id of the place in which the diameter changed. In this example I would need it to display id 102 and id 105

  • You can use LAG window function – sagi Oct 11 at 22:05
  • SELECT a.* FROM tableX AS a WHERE a.diameter <> ( SELECT TOP 1 b.diameter FROM tableX AS b WHERE a.id > b.id ORDER BY b.id ) – Edu Galindo Oct 11 at 22:11
  • that is how my current code looks like now – Edu Galindo Oct 11 at 22:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You want to use lag() in SQL Server 2012+:

select t.*
from (select t.*, lag(t.diameter) over (order by t.id) as prev_diameter
      from t
     ) t
where prev_diameter <> diameter;

In SQL Server 2008, a correlated subquery or apply can work:

select t.*
from t cross apply
     (select top (1) t2.*
      from t t2
      where t2.id < t.id
      order by t2.id desc
     ) tprev
where tprev.diameter <> t.diameter
  • 2
    OP tagged the question with SQL Server 2008. Any alternatives? – Connor Oct 11 at 22:08
  • 1
    One of these days I will beat you to posting an answer for a SQL question! Not sure when but one day!! I am watching you (I am pointing two fingers at my eyes when I say that like DeNiro in Meet the Parents). – CodingYoshi Oct 11 at 22:12

You need to loop through all the records and compare if prev_Record = curr_Record. If condition is false save I'd into a @temp variable an return it at the end

  • 1
    When dealing with SQL, try and use a set-based approach. Looping is not set-based. See GordonLinoff's answer. – CodingYoshi Oct 11 at 22:16
  • This approach is extremely inefficient -- Especially if the OP has thousands or hundreds of thousands of rows. – Zak Oct 11 at 22:21

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