I have a base class implementing an interface and further a specialized class inheriting the base class.

I have implemented interface's method in base class and marked it as virtual, also overridden the same method in specialized class.

Now i want to resolve the method GetData() on some basis that it either returns base class's method or child class's method.

So basically how can I call base class method using the specialized class's reference or interface's reference?

Edit 1 I have an existing data provider and I want to keep its functionality as it is and want to use some subclass or wrapper class where i can write a new implementation(another provider), mind that I want to keep running existing provider as it is for existing scenario and the new provider for other scenarios). what if i use decorator pattern to solve this? Any other pattern which can solve this ?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    interface IDataProvider
    {
        void GetData();
    }

     abstract class StandardDataProvider : IDataProvider
    {
        public virtual void GetData()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("GetData_StandardDataProvider");
        }
    }

    class ManagedDataProvider : StandardDataProvider
    {

        public override void GetData()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("GetData_ManagedDataProvider");
        }

    }


    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {       

            IDataProvider dataprovider = new  ManagedDataProvider();

            dataprovider.GetData();

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
  • Virtual/overriden methods are specifically designed to prevent this behavior. If you want to be able to access StandardDataProvider members that are overridden by ManagedDataProvider, then ManagedDataProvider will have to expose a new method to get at them. – BJ Myers Oct 11 at 22:35
  • 4
    In my opinion, whatever you try to solve with this approach, this approach looks flawed to me. You have a base class that defines some action/behavior "GetData()". Then the concrete class inheriting from this base class is overriding this action/behavior. Now you want to choose whether the concrete class will do the overridden behavior or not on some arbitrary external circumstances. This is not well thought out... – elgonzo Oct 11 at 22:36
  • I don't understand why you would override something and then not use it? If you want the base functionality, do not override it in that type. – CodingYoshi Oct 11 at 22:37
  • I am not sure if that would work for you, but you could perhaps bake the decision of which action to do into the GetData() override in ManagedDataProvider, like: public override void GetData() { if (shouldUseBaseImplementation) base.GetData(); else Console.WriteLine("GetData_ManagedDataProvider"); } – elgonzo Oct 11 at 22:44

This is the only solution I could come up with for your problem:

interface IDataProvider
{
    void GetData();
}

abstract class StandardDataProvider : IDataProvider
{
    public virtual void GetData()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("GetData_StandardDataProvider");
    }
}

class ManagedDataProvider : StandardDataProvider
{

    public override void GetData()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("GetData_ManagedDataProvider");
    }

    public void GetBaseData()
    {
        base.GetData();
    }
}



class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        IDataProvider dataprovider = new ManagedDataProvider();

        dataprovider.GetData();
        if (dataprovider is ManagedDataProvider)
            {
                (dataprovider as ManagedDataProvider).GetBaseData();
            }


        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Another Way to attack it is adding GetBaseData to the Interface.

interface IDataProvider
{
    void GetData();
    void GetBaseData();
}

abstract class StandardDataProvider : IDataProvider
{
    public virtual void GetData()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("GetData_StandardDataProvider");
    }

    public virtual void GetBaseData()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("GetData_StandardDataProvider");
    }
}

class ManagedDataProvider : StandardDataProvider
{

    public override void GetData()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("GetData_ManagedDataProvider");
    }

    public override void GetBaseData()
    {
        base.GetData();
    }
}



class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        IDataProvider dataprovider = new ManagedDataProvider();

        dataprovider.GetData();
        dataprovider.GetBaseData();            

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

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