Why is IEqualityComparer not working with strings?

type
    TRec = record
        s: string;
    end;

var
    rec1, rec2: TRec;
    comparer: IEqualityComparer<TRec>;
    res: boolean;
begin
    rec1.s := 'a';
    rec2.s := 'a';

    comparer := TEqualityComparer<TRec>.default;
    res := comparer.equals(rec1, rec2);
    showMessage(boolToStr(res));

If the TRec entry contains a numeric value or a string of a certain length, then IEqualityComparer works correctly. How to make this code works?

  • 1
    It works for strings but you are not passing a string. You pass a record. And for records the comparer just does a binary comparison. You need to write your own custom comparer. – David Heffernan Oct 12 at 6:51
  • 1
    See TEqualityComparer<T> may fail for records due to alignment. Write your own comparer. – LU RD Oct 12 at 6:52
  • Instead of writing your own comparer, simply use TEqualityComparer.Construct. – Rudy Velthuis Oct 12 at 7:38
  • 1
    In my view, "writing a comparer" would mean writing a new class, inheriting, etc. I wouldn't call using Construct with an anonmeth "writing a comparer", but I agree that that is up to interpretation. – Rudy Velthuis Oct 12 at 7:42
  • 1
    @rudy Construct is the idiomatic way to write a comparer – David Heffernan Oct 12 at 9:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edit:

As Rudy Velthuis noticed in comments, in fresh Delphi versions result is true for equal constant strings because they share the same memory and have the same address (so my former supposition about better RTTI is wrong).

For complex types equality default comparer still chooses low-level comparer that compares raw bytes of both records - different adresses for similar string bodies in the second case of my example.

So reliable approach is constructing own comparer to work with complex types - see the third example below.

type
    TRecS = record
        s: string;
    end;
 var
    rec1, rec2: TRecS;
    comparerS: IEqualityComparer<TRecS>;
    cmp: IEqualityComparer<TRecS>;
    res: boolean;
begin
    rec1.s := 'const';
    rec2.s := 'const';
    comparerS := TEqualityComparer<TRecS>.default;
    res := comparerS.equals(rec1, rec2);
    Memo1.Lines.Add(boolToStr(res));

    rec1.s := IntToStr(88);
    rec2.s := IntToStr(88);
    res := comparerS.equals(rec1, rec2);
    Memo1.Lines.Add(boolToStr(res));

    cmp := TEqualityComparer<TRecS>.Construct(
                      function(const Left, Right: TRecS): Boolean
                      begin
                          Result := Left.S = Right.S
                      end,
                      nil);
   res := cmp.equals(rec1, rec2);
   Memo1.Lines.Add(boolToStr(res));

    -1  //denotes true
    0  
    -1
  • I use Delphi XE7, and how can I solve this problem here? – nup Oct 12 at 6:55
  • Make own comparer. I gave the simplest example. – MBo Oct 12 at 7:09
  • @downvoter - if you believe that my answer is wrong, tell us about mistakes – MBo Oct 12 at 9:51
  • AFAIK, in Tokyo you still get a binary comparer. But if both strings are assigned a constant, they are the same (i.e. they point to the same constant), so even a binary comparison sees them as equal. But if you do: rec1.s := IntToStr(1234); rec2 := IntToStr(1234); the strings have different addresses, but should still compare as equal. My output in Tokyo indicates they are not equal, because there are two different strings (different addresses, but equal payload). This shows they still do a binary compare, if you don't use Construct... – Rudy Velthuis Oct 12 at 11:43
  • ... I had hoped that they'd use the type info to generate an interface that would check each field individually. Nope, still a binary compare of the record. – Rudy Velthuis Oct 12 at 11:44

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