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The exercise is related to item 78 from Effective Java. Namely, we create two threads that increment common static variable in parallel and print it out. The goal is to produce a uniform line of increasing numbers to the console. AtomicLong is used to avoid race conditions, but there's a bug I can't explain. Namely, with first call to

System.out.println(i.getAndIncrement());

the JVM doesn't read the most recent variable value. Only on the second call it reads. Please see the console output with inconsistent output marked Can somebody please advice me on what to learn to clear this bug by myself? Is it time yet to read the JVM specifications?

package com.util.concurrency.tick;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;

public class AtomicIncrementer implements Runnable {

  private String name;
  private static final int MAXI = 1000;
  private static final AtomicLong i = new AtomicLong(-1);

  public AtomicIncrementer(String name){
    this.name = name;
  }

  public void run(){
    while(i.get() < MAXI){
      System.out.println(name+ ". i = "
        +i.getAndIncrement());
    }
    System.out.println(name+" i = "+i.get()); 
  }

  public static void main(String[] args){;
         try {
              Thread t1 = new Thread(new AtomicIncrementer("A"));
              Thread t2 = new Thread(new AtomicIncrementer("B"));
              t1.start();
              t2.start();
            } catch (Exception e) {
            }
        System.out.println("Two incrementers launched");
   }
}
  • 1
    You have no synchronization between the threads at all, therefore it's unpredictable in which order the values are printed. Just because AtomicLong can atomically get and increment a value doesn't automatically make the loop and print statements in your threads synchronized. – Jesper Oct 12 '18 at 7:06
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Basically you haven't used synchronization.

you can change your run method like below :

public void run(){

      synchronized(i){
    while(i.get() < MAXI){
      System.out.println(name+ ". i = "
        +i.getAndIncrement());
    }

    System.out.println(name+" i = "+i.get());
      }
  }

Also, You can refer this tutorial to get more idea on synchronization : https://www.tutorialspoint.com/java/java_thread_synchronization.htm

  • If I synchronize by i, the first thread grabs the value and increments it until the end, leaving no work to the other. However, this is still the intended behaviour. I understand that this program can't be executed in parallel, only sequentally or simply single-threadly. – AT Shtirlitz Oct 12 '18 at 7:20
  • @ATShtirlitz right, you can accept and upvote the answer if satisfied. – Raj Oct 12 '18 at 9:25
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This is probably what you are trying to do :) Do check the java docs. You want to synchronise between the 2 threads. Basically each thread gets 1 turn to increment and passes the counter to the other thread.

public class AtomicIncrementer implements Runnable {

    private static final int MAXI = 1000;
    private static final SynchronousQueue<Long> LONG_EXCHANGER = new SynchronousQueue<>();

    private final String name;

    private AtomicIncrementer(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {

        try {

            while (true) {

                Long counter = LONG_EXCHANGER.take();
                if (counter >= MAXI) {
                    LONG_EXCHANGER.put(counter);
                    break;
                }

                System.out.println(name + ". i = " + (counter + 1));
                LONG_EXCHANGER.put(counter + 1);
            }

            Long counter = LONG_EXCHANGER.take();
            System.out.println(name + " final i = " + counter);
            LONG_EXCHANGER.put(counter);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Thread t1 = new Thread(new AtomicIncrementer("A"));
        Thread t2 = new Thread(new AtomicIncrementer("B"));
        t1.start();
        t2.start();
        System.out.println("Two incrementers launched");

        try {
            LONG_EXCHANGER.put(-1L);
            t1.join();
            System.out.println("T1 ended");
            //this is needed for last thread to end
            LONG_EXCHANGER.take();
            t2.join();
            System.out.println("T2 ended");
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
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Synchronisation is not the problem, as AtomicLong is just for that. Rather under the hood shared fields must be updated from & to local thread memory at thread switching. For that exists volatile:

private static final volatile AtomicLong i = new AtomicLong(-1);

In fact I am not entirely sure! For a long the situation is clear, but there is just one object; its long field being updated.

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You have many race conditions here. The following order of events will lead to the result you see:

Thread A runs until i=198. Then there's context switch and thread B runs the following command:

System.out.println(name+ ". i = "
        +i.getAndIncrement());

inside the while loop. Thread B creates the string :

"B. i = 198"

But then there's a context switch again to thread A, before thread B has the chance to print that string. So thread A continues to execute until it prints

A. i=204

Then there's a context switch to Thread B and it resumes from where it stopped before, which was printing the string:

B. i = 198

Basically, you have a race condition before getting the current value of i, and printing it.

In other words i.getAndIncrement(); is an atomic operation. But,

System.out.println(name+ ". i = "
        +i.getAndIncrement());

is NOT an atomic operation.

You have here multiple operations. In pseudocode:

 1. tempInt = i.getAndIncrement();
 2. tempString1 = name + ". i = ";
 3. tempString2 = convertToString(tempInt);
 4. tempString3 = tempString1 + tempString2;
 5. print tempString3;

That's why you have such a jumbled output:)

If you want to to understand those concepts in depth, I recommend this online course: https://www.udemy.com/java-multithreading-concurrency-performance-optimization/?couponCode=CONCURRENCY

It's really cheap and you can finish it in a few hours. But it really goes in depth about those concepts and caveats with atomic classes. It's a great time investment.

In your case what you want to do is indeed use synchronization instead of AtomicLong, as what you have here is a multi operations critical section.

I hope it helps.

  • Thank you very much for pointing out that every statement might consist of several evaluations, with threads racing from one to another. – AT Shtirlitz Oct 23 '18 at 20:28

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