I can't really phrase the question's title. Anyway, say I have a statement like:

if(myObject.SomeMethod() != null)
{
    DoSomethingWith(myObject.SomeMethod());
}

I'd like to avoid a double call to SomeMethod(). Ideally, something à la pattern matching like:

if(myObject.SomeMethod() result != null)
{
    DoSomethingWith(result);
}

Is there something in the language that can help me with this? At the moment, my choice is to go with:

var result = myObject.SomeMethod();
if(result != null)
{
    DoSomethingWith(result);
}

I know there's nothing wrong in the method above, it's very canonical. Simply put, a lot of syntactic sugar has been added to the language lately, allowing us to condense our code a lot: I'm asking because I don't know if there's something preventing if(myObject.SomeMethod() result != null) to work.

  • 3
    What's bad with using a variable? That's exactly what you should do – Tim Schmelter Oct 12 at 10:14
  • I would suggest explaining what you find wrong, perhaps you have a false assumption – bradbury9 Oct 12 at 10:17
  • Absolutely nothing intrinsically bad, like nothing was bad in var x = y as T; if(x != null) { } instead of if(y is T x) { } – ccalboni Oct 12 at 11:26
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, i'd suggest to use a variable as you did in your third code. However...

You can use pattern matching if you don't want to use a variable:

if(myObject.SomeMethod() is var result && result != null)
{
    DoSomethingWith(result);
}

But note that this doesn't prevent access to the variable result. You can even access it after the if. If you want that you need a new scope: { if... }.

  • If you know the type T returned by SomeMethod, can you condense to if (myObject.SomeMethod() is T result) ? (I.e. does that include the null check?) – Rawling Oct 12 at 10:43
  • @Rawling: i don't think that this compiles – Tim Schmelter Oct 12 at 10:53
  • Understood. Seems to work but as you suggested, but it's less readable. Thank you for your suggestion. – ccalboni Oct 12 at 12:12

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