1

I'm trying to select some data, I'm joining 3 tables together, but one of the joins has a where statement. Once I have done the joins I need to add another where statement to select a date range and a location. I am getting an error on the second WHERE clause.

  SELECT a.[ID]
      ,a.[item_no]
      ,a.[qty]
  FROM [MYDB].[dbo].[details] AS a


  INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] AS b
  ON a.[item_no] = b.[item_no]
  INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[options] AS c
  ON a.[number] = c.[number] 
  WHERE a.[item_no] = c.[item_no]

WHERE b.[destination] = 'my destination'
AND b.[date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15' 

Would really appreciate any help.

Thanks

  • When you get an error you should post it in your question, you have two solutions, one is to add the conditions to ON or add it to the last WHERE with another AND. – Sami Oct 12 '18 at 10:51
  • I would advise getting used to adding to the ON with an AND. The results can be different, but if you're narrowing down a JOIN, more often than not it's the JOIN you are thinking about, not the other tables in other JOINs – Red Oct 12 '18 at 10:54
2

There are a number of answers posted already that will help you fix your code, but I wanted to explicitly address the misunderstanding that lead to the problem you're having. In your question, you said:

...one of the joins has a where statement.

But that's not correct. The WHERE clause is a part of the SELECT statement, not a part of the JOIN.

Broadly speaking, the SQL engine starts interpreting your query by looking at the FROM clause. Essentially, it starts by asking where your data will be coming from. Your FROM clause includes your base table, [MYDB].[dbo].[details], plus any additional tables you're joining to. The ON criteria of your JOIN tells the engine which fields in the tables have corresponding data points. In the case of an INNER JOIN, this can have the effect of restricting the resulting data set, which is also the effect of a WHERE clause, but the filtering that results from the JOIN happens at the beginning of the query, when the engine is pulling the data into memory that your query will be manipulating.

After that initial data set is built, the engine reads the WHERE clause and applies any filters specified there.

Here's the MSDN discussion on the Logical Processing Order of the SELECT statement.

You can specify multiple ON conditions in your JOIN to restrict the amount of data pulled into the initial data set. For instance, your first JOIN could be re-written like this:

INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] AS b
ON 
  a.[item_no] = b.[item_no]
  AND 
  b.[date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15' 

With INNER JOIN, there's not much (any) difference between putting the filtering criteria in the JOIN or in a WHERE, but with OUTER JOIN, the results can, and will, be dramatically different, so it's important to understand what each component in the SELECT statement does, and when it does it.

Since all of your joins are INNER, your query could actually be written without a WHERE clause at all, like this:

SELECT a.[ID]
  ,a.[item_no]
  ,a.[qty]
FROM 
  [MYDB].[dbo].[details] AS a
INNER JOIN 
  [MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] AS b
  ON 
    a.[item_no] = b.[item_no]
    AND
    b.[destination] = 'my destination'
    AND 
    b.[date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15' 
  INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[options] AS c
  ON 
    a.[number] = c.[number] 
    AND
    a.[item_no] = c.[item_no]

On systems that are light on memory, filtering in the ON clause can reduce memory pressure, and I've used them that way, but most people find WHERE clauses to be more readable, since that's where we usually look for data filters.

  • 1
    Thanks so much for explaining this it makes a lot of sense now thank you. – Richard Oct 12 '18 at 15:34
  • Glad it helped! – Eric Brandt Oct 12 '18 at 15:50
5

Try below

SELECT a.[ID]
      ,a.[item_no]
      ,a.[qty]
  FROM [MYDB].[dbo].[details] AS a


  INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] AS b
  ON a.[item_no] = b.[item_no]
  INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[options] AS c
  ON a.[number] = c.[number] 
  and a.[item_no] = c.[item_no]

WHERE b.[destination] = 'my destination'
AND b.[date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15' 
  • To add another condition to a JOIN you use an AND. This is not always the same as adding to the WHERE, so be careful – Red Oct 12 '18 at 10:52
3

Use AND instead of WHERE in JOIN statement.

2

Only one where clause per query. This should be what you want to do:

SELECT d.[ID], d.[item_no], d.[qty]
FROM [MYDB].[dbo].[details] d JOIN
     MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] dv
     ON d.[item_no] = dv.[item_no] JOIN
     [MYDB].[dbo].[options] o
     ON d.[number] = o.[number] AND d.[item_no] = o.[item_no]
WHERE dv.[destination] = 'my destination' AND
      dv.[date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15' ;

You will note that I changed the table aliases to table abbreviations. Meaningful table aliases make a query easier to read and maintain.

The condition in the first WHERE clause is a JOIN condition. It really belongs in the ON clause rather than the WHERE clause.

2

Just add WHERE clause & move a.[item_no] = c.[item_no] with ON clause :

SELECT a.[ID], a.[item_no], a.[qty]
FROM [MYDB].[dbo].[details] AS a INNER JOIN 
     [MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] AS b
     ON a.[item_no] = b.[item_no] INNER JOIN 
     [MYDB].[dbo].[options] AS c 
     ON a.[number] = c.[number] AND a.[item_no] = c.[item_no]
WHERE b.[destination] = 'my destination' AND
      b.[date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15'; 
1

You just need to extend existing WHERE clause.

SELECT a.[ID]
      ,a.[item_no]
      ,a.[qty]
  FROM [MYDB].[dbo].[details] AS a
  INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] AS b
  ON a.[item_no] = b.[item_no]
  INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[options] AS c
  ON a.[number] = c.[number] 
  WHERE a.[item_no] = c.[item_no] AND b.[destination] = 'my destination'
AND b.[date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15' 
1

if table has huge data and you want to apply join with other tables that will create performance problem, first filter data in sub query of table then apply join with other tables so that loop execution will be reduced while applying join with tables,for further detail you can check the execution plan and query process steps

  SELECT a.[ID]
   ,a.[item_no]
  ,a.[qty]
 FROM [MYDB].[dbo].[details] AS a


INNER JOIN (Select * from  [MYDB].[dbo].[delivery] 
WHERE [destination] = 'my destination'
AND [date] BETWEEN '2018-10-14' AND '2018-10-15' ) AS b
 ON a.[item_no] = b.[item_no]
INNER JOIN [MYDB].[dbo].[options] AS c
ON a.[number] = c.[number] 
and a.[item_no] = c.[item_no]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.