3

Consider the following class with a binary operator (I use operator+ just as an example).

struct B{};

template<class>
struct A{
    template<class BB>
    void operator+(BB const&) const{std::cout<<"member"<<std::endl;}
    template<class BB>
    friend void operator+(BB const&, A const&){std::cout<<"friend"<<std::endl;}
};

I can call this binary operator with two different types:

A<int> a;
B b;
a + b; // member
b + a; // friend

Then when I try to use A on both sides (a + a) a lot of strange things happen. Three compilers give different answer to the same code.

Some context: I don't want to define void operator+(A const&) because I need a template to SFINAE functions away if some syntax doesn't work. Also I don't want a template<class BB, class AA> friend void operator(BB const&, AA const&). Because since A is a template, different instantiations will produce multiple definitions of the same template.

Continuing with the original code:

Strange thing # 1: In gcc, the friend takes precedence:

a + a; // prints friend in gcc

I expect the member to take precedence, is there a way for the member to take precedence gcc?

Strange thing # 2: In clang, this code doesn't compile:

a + a; // use of overload is ambiguous

This already points out at an inconsistency between gcc and clang, who is right? What would be a workaround for clang that makes it work like gcc?

If I try to be more greedy in the arguments, e.g. to apply some optimization I could use forwarding references:

struct A{
    template<class BB>
    void operator+(BB&&) const{std::cout<<"member"<<std::endl;}
    template<class BB>
    friend void operator+(BB&&, A const&){std::cout<<"friend"<<std::endl;}
};

Strange thing # 3: Using forwarding reference gives a warning in gcc,

a + a; // print "friend", but gives "warning: ISO C++ says that these are ambiguous, even though the worst conversion for the first is better than the worst conversion for the second:"

But still compiles, How can I silence this warning in gcc or workaround? Just as in case # 1, I expect to prefer the member function but here it prefers the friend function and gives a warning.

Strange thing # 4: Using forwarding reference gives an error in clang.

a + a; // error: use of overloaded operator '+' is ambiguous (with operand types 'A' and 'A')

Which again points at an inconsistency between gcc and clang, who is right in this case?

In summary, I am trying to make this code work consistently. I really want the function to be injected friend function (not free friend functions). I don't want to define a function with equal non-template arguments because different instantiation will produce duplicated declarations of the same functions.


Here is the full code to play with:

#include<iostream>
using std::cout;
struct B{};

template<class>
struct A{
    template<class BB>
    void operator+(BB const& /*or BB&&*/) const{cout<<"member\n";}
    template<class BB>
    friend void operator+(BB const& /*or BB const&*/, A const&){cout<<"friend\n";}
};

int main(){
    A<int> a;      //previos version of the question had a typo here: A a;
    B b;
    a + b; // calls member
    b + a; // class friend
    a + a; // surprising result (friend) or warning in gcc, hard error in clang, MSVC gives `member` (see below)

    A<double> a2; // just to instantiate another template
}

Note: I am using clang version 6.0.1 and g++ (GCC) 8.1.1 20180712. According to Francis Cugler MSVS 2017 CE give yet a different behavior.


I found a workaround that does the correct thing (prints 'member' for a+a case) for both clang and gcc (for MSVS?), but it requires a lot for boiler plate and an artificial base class:

template<class T>
struct A_base{
    template<class BB>
    friend void operator+(BB const&, A_base<T> const&){std::cout<<"friend"<<std::endl;}
};

template<class T>
struct A : A_base<T>{
    template<class BB>
    void operator+(BB const&) const{std::cout<<"member"<<std::endl;}
};

However it still give an ambiguous call if I replace BB const& with BB&&.

1

These are all ambiguous. There are known partial ordering bugs in GCC when ordering a member and a non-member, e.g. https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=66914.

Just constrain your friend to not participate in overload resolution if BB is a specialization of A.

  • Thanks, but how do you do such constraining? I tried with enable_if but it didn't help because the error happens before the function is eliminated. – alfC Oct 14 '18 at 19:43
  • That bug points to a duplicate gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=53499 , this is around since 2012. It seems that there is no much interest. I would say that this feature is fundamental to implement algebraic types correctly. – alfC Oct 14 '18 at 19:49
1

I went and ran your code in Visual Studio 2017 CE as:

int main(){
    A<int> a;
    B b;
    a + b; // calls member
    b + a; // class friend
    a + a; // surprising result or warning in gcc, hard error in clang
}

And Visual Studio compiled without errors, and ran successfully without warnings and when the program returned it exited with a code of (0) with this output:

member
friend
member

I've tried this with float, double, char and got the same results.

Even as an extra test I added this after the template class above:

/* your code here */

struct C {};

int main() {
    A<C> a;
    B b;
    a + b;
    b + a;
    a + a;

    return 0;
}

And still got the same results.


As for the later part of your question that pertains to Strange thing #1, #2, #3, #4: that pertains to both gcc & clang

I did not have this issue with Visual Studio as a + a was giving me a member for the output and the member was taking precedence over the friend overload. Now as for the fact of operator precedence I don't know off the top of my head if GCC and Clang will differ from Visual Studio as each compiler works differently and I'm not real familiar with them but as for the language itself your compiler doesn't know what to do with A::+() when it doesn't know what kind of <type> to be using. However it knows what to do when you have A<int>::+() or A<char>::+() or A<C>::+()...

  • Yes, sorry, it didn't copy the <int> in A<int> in the example. I corrected it now, so you can remove the first part of your answer. In any case, MSVC shows a third behavior (and the one we expected). – alfC Oct 13 '18 at 20:09
  • I modified your answer to remove the part that was caused by my mistake. – alfC Oct 13 '18 at 20:19
  • @alfC Not a problem and thank you for the assistance! – Francis Cugler Oct 13 '18 at 20:56
1
+100

You want to disable the friend if BB is convertible to A:

template<
  class BB,
  std::enable_if<
    !std::is_convertible<B const&, A>::value, int>::type = 0>
friend void operator+(BB const&, A const&){std::cout<<"friend"<<std::endl;}

Note: you need to use the std::enable_if as the type to make it so that the function declaration never resolves if the SFINAE doesn't resolve.

Another hint is if you want to resolve to the member function if BB is merly castable to A (and not equal to A) you may want to provide a default type for the template:

template <typename BB = A>
void operator++(BB const&) const {/*...*/}

That is only really useful if you provide other opterator++'s to the class, but it is worth noting.

  • Would you constrain the friend or the member function? – alfC Oct 20 '18 at 8:01
  • 1
    It depends which you want selected. My gut is that you'll want to use the use the member when BB==A, so you want to disable the friend function, but that it entirely up to you :-). Another hint is you may want to have the member function be template <class BB=A>, which will help the member function resolve if BB is castable to A. I'll add that to my edit. – IdeaHat Oct 20 '18 at 19:27
  • Thanks, I was thinking in the case in which the generic effect of the friend and the member is the same. That is, the case which is an arithmetic operation in which both have the same final effect but still the compilers requires the ambiguity to be resolved. – alfC Oct 20 '18 at 20:02
  • Regarding your edit, I am not sure if a default template argument helps with the deduction or to resolve the ambiguity. – alfC Oct 20 '18 at 20:05
  • (in other words, the sad part of this workaround is that I don't even want to change behavior but just disambiguate a benign ambiguity. I don't know why the member function wouldn't be preferred at this point and be done with it, as apparently MSVS would do, according to the other answer). – alfC Oct 20 '18 at 21:29

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