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I was trying out this libPNG example, but it failed at compilation. I used gcc -lm -lpng makePNG.c to compile it and got the following error:

/tmp/ccgGO8zw.o: In function `writeImage':
makePNG.c:(.text+0x360): undefined reference to `setRGB'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

I removed the function definitions and simply moved the functions so that they were in the following order:

void setRGB(png_byte *ptr, float val)
int writeImage(char* filename, int width, int height, float *buffer, char* title)
float *createMandelbrotImage(int width, int height, float xS, float yS, float rad, int maxIteration)
int main(int argc, char *argv[])

And it worked. My question is: why didn't it work before? SetRGB was defined prior to writeImage, so how could the 'setRGB' reference be undefined?

Edit:

I forgot to mention something that I now realize is very important. I removed the 'inline' keyword from the setRGB function. I tried compiling with the inline keyword and it had the same error message. So clearly my issue has to do with the inline keyword and not the forward declarations like I originally thought...

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    Example compiles and builds fine see Resulting .png Try gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=gnu11 -Ofast -o libpngex libpngex.c -lm -lpng and then run ./libpngex output.png – David C. Rankin Oct 13 '18 at 20:19
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    The inline keyword is just a "hint" to the compiler that it can inline the function. There is no guarantee it does it. But, you must be consistent between the function declaration and function definition. You cannot have inline on one and not the other -- they will be seen as two different functions. – David C. Rankin Oct 13 '18 at 20:22
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    Sorry @sam you were confused. The name of my source was libpngex.c. Just use your makePNG instead, e.g. gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=gnu11 -Ofast -o makePNG -lm -lpng makePNG.c And then run ./makePNG somepng.png – David C. Rankin Oct 13 '18 at 20:32
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    What you posted was gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=gnu11 -Ofast -o libpngex makePNG.c -lm -lpng makePNG.c. Get rid of one of the makePNG.c in there and your output will be in libpngex or get rid of libpngex and remove the '.c' from the first makePNG.c. – David C. Rankin Oct 13 '18 at 20:34
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    If you look closely at the command you posted gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=gnu11 -Ofast -o libpngex makePNG.c -lm -lpng makePNG.c you included makePNG.c twice. That is what led to the ‘code’ might be clobbered... warnings. – David C. Rankin Oct 13 '18 at 20:39
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Thanks to David C. Rankin I have found a command that works to compile this. gcc -Ofast -lm -lpng makePNG.c works because it includes the -Ofast option. This is the description of that option in man gcc:

-Ofast

Disregard strict standards compliance.

-Ofast enables all -O3 optimizations. It also enables optimizations that are not valid for all standard-compliant programs. It turns on -ffast-math and the Fortran-specific -fno-protect-parens and -fstack-arrays.

I suspect the way the author uses inline does not comply with the c specification, and that's why it won't compile without this option. Needless to say it is never OK to write code that doesn't comply with the c standards.

Edit:

Proof that the -Ofast option is the culprit:

$ gcc -Ofast -lm -lpng makePNG.c
$ gcc -lm -lpng makePNG.c
/tmp/cc2JlymP.o: In function `writeImage':
makePNG.c:(.text+0x360): undefined reference to `setRGB'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status
$ 
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    The actual issue is in the use of setjmp(png_jmpbuf(png_ptr)). Have a look at the last sentence in the man page " setjmp() and sigsetjmp() make programs hard to understand and maintain. If possible, an alternative should be used." This code will compile cleanly with -O2 or higher optimization. There were changes to libpng in libpng12 and later that hid the actual png structure members which require the use of png_jmpbuf. – David C. Rankin Oct 13 '18 at 21:05
  • You are correct, it even works with -O optimization on my machine. – Display name Oct 13 '18 at 21:15

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