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I am working on a string reversal problem where I am trying to swap values from two ends with one another. As a part of the reverse function, I have a line that checks whether the pointer has reached the end-of-string character (in the form of while(*end!= '\0')). However, this doesn't seem to be working, and at the end of the while loop when I de-reference "end" I get blank. When I use (while(*end)), everything works perfectly but I have to then decrement my pointer "end" to make sure I am accessing the last element of my string. Why can't I check the pointer against the string literal '\0'?

#include<stdio.h>

void reverse(char* s);

void main(){
    char str[]="abcdef";
    printf("%s\n",str);
    reverse(str);
    printf("%s\n",str);
}

void reverse(char* p){  
    char* start = p;
    char* end = p;
    char tmp;
    int length =0;

    while(*end!='\0'){
        end+=1;
        length+=1;
    }
    printf("%c\n",*end); // problem line

    int c;
    for (c = 0; c < length/2; c++)
    {        
      tmp   = *start;
      *start   = *end;
      *end = tmp;

      start++;
      end--;
    }
    //printf("%s\n",p);
}
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  • 1
    At the "problem line" *end equals \0, i.e. end points to the end-of-string character. With both while(*end!='\0') end while(*end) you should end up in this end-of-string character. So you should decrement end before beginning the reversion. Maybe I missed a point in your question.
    – Amessihel
    Oct 14 '18 at 16:44
  • D'oh, of course. Thank you!
    – Deniz
    Oct 14 '18 at 17:18
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please note that the preferred way of saying 'thanks' around here is by up-voting good questions and helpful answers (once you have enough reputation to do so), and by accepting the most helpful answer to any question you ask (which also gives you a small boost to your reputation). Please see the About page and also How do I ask questions here? and What do I do when someone answers my question? Oct 14 '18 at 20:11
2

In the //Problem line the value of *end is '\0' - You should print the integer value of '\0' to verify which is 0 & it works - apart from that you'll need to uncomment the } from reverse function.

'\0' is a non printable character: Reference: Non-printable and Printable ASCII Characters

1
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

size_t mystrlen(const char *str)
{
    const char *ptr = str;

    while(*ptr++);

    return ptr - str;
}

char *reverse(char *str)
{
    size_t len = mystrlen(str);
    char *end = str + len -1;
    char *saved = str;

    len /= 2;
    while(len--)
    {
        char tmp = *str;
        *str++ = *end;
        *end-- = tmp;
    }
    return saved;
}

int main(void)
{
    char str[] = "This is the string which will be reversed";

    printf("%s\n", reverse(str));

}
3
  • Why not use *--end = tmp; and not have that other -1 at the top? Oct 14 '18 at 17:10
  • @AlexisWilke because importancy of it is marginal (as thew most time is consumed in the loop) and I wanted to show OP where his error is. Oct 14 '18 at 17:34
  • One thing I like, though, is you breaking up the code in separate reusable functions. This is good. Oct 14 '18 at 17:55
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your code works. end reaches '\0'. but printf prints string until the first '\0'. so your print appears empty. if you add after the while loop:
--end; or change the while to: while(*(end+1)) your code will do what you want it to

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  • while(*(end+1)) is wrong. If the string is empty, it will miss the '\0'. The --end after the loop is okay. If the string is empty his for() does nothing anyway. However, moving the --end; in the for() loop is a better idea. Oct 14 '18 at 17:09
  • 1
    good point, there should be a check to make sure that it is not an empty string. And always a check that pointer is not NULL if it is dereferenced, so, it is good practice to check (p!= NULL) at the beginning of he function.
    – H.cohen
    Oct 14 '18 at 17:29
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You don't need the length variable, and you can use pre-decrement on end.

#include <stdio.h>

void reverse(char *start);

int main(void) {
    char str[]= "abcdef";
    printf("%s\n", str);
    reverse(str);
    printf("%s\n", str);
}

void reverse(char* start) {
    char *end = start;
    while(*end != '\0') {
        end++;
    }
    while(start < end) {
        char temp = *--end;
        *end = *start;
        *start++ = temp;
    }
}

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