6

I have the following code where I am irritated by the fact that compiler is unable to see that variable passed as argument to a function is constexpr so I must use arity 0 function instead of 1 argument function.

I know this is not a compiler bug, but I wonder if there are idioms that enable to workaround this problem.

#include <array>
#include <iostream>

static constexpr std::array<int, 5> arr{11, 22, 33, 44, 55};

template <typename C, typename P, typename Y>
static constexpr void copy_if(const C& rng, P p, Y yi3ld) {
    for (const auto& elem: rng) {
        if (p(elem)){
            yi3ld(elem);
        }
    }
}

// template<std::size_t N>
static constexpr auto get_evens(/* const std::array<int, N>& arr */) {
    constexpr auto is_even = [](const int i) constexpr {return i % 2 == 0;};
    constexpr int cnt = [/* &arr, */&is_even]() constexpr {
        int cnt = 0;
        auto increment = [&cnt] (const auto&){cnt++;};
        copy_if(arr, is_even, increment);
        return cnt;
    }();
    std::array<int, cnt> result{};
    int idx = 0;
    copy_if(arr, is_even, [&result, &idx](const auto& val){ result[idx++] = val;});
    return result;
}

int main() {
    // constexpr std::array<int, 5> arr{11, 22, 33, 44, 55};
    for (const int i:get_evens(/* arr */)) {
        std::cout << i << " " << std::endl;
    }
}

If it is not obvious what I want: I would like to change get_evens signature so that it is template templated on array size N and that it takes 1 argument of type const std::array<int, N>&.

The error message when I change arr to be an function argument isn't helpful:

prog.cc:25:21: note: initializer of 'cnt' is not a constant expression prog.cc:19:19: note: declared here constexpr int cnt = [&arr, &is_even]()constexpr {

10
  • "I know this is not a compiler bug" - I wouldn't be certain. Oct 15, 2018 at 8:05
  • 3
    Cannot reproduce with latest gcc and clang.
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 8:07
  • @evg code I pasted works, if you change it that get_evens takes array as an argument then it does not work Oct 15, 2018 at 8:08
  • 6
    Then please add the code that doesn't work. Function argument itself is never constexpr.
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 8:09
  • 1
    I've edited your code, please check if I interpreted your intention correctly.
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 8:31

5 Answers 5

10

A function argument is never a constant expression, even if a function is used in constexpr context:

constexpr int foo(int i)
{
    // i is not a constexpr
    return i + 1;
}

constexpr auto i = 1;
constexpr auto j = foo(i);    

To mimic a constexpr argument, use a template parameter:

template<int i>
constexpr int foo()
{
    // i is constexpr
    return i + 1;
}

constexpr auto i = 1;
constexpr auto j = foo<i>();

A possible solution is to use std::integer_sequence to encode integers into a type:

#include <array>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename P, typename Y, int... elements>
constexpr void copy_if_impl(P p, Y yi3ld, std::integer_sequence<int, elements...>) {
    ((p(elements) && (yi3ld(elements), true)), ...);
}

template<typename arr_t, typename P, typename Y>
constexpr void copy_if(P p, Y yi3ld) {
    copy_if_impl(p, yi3ld, arr_t{});
}

template<typename arr_t>
constexpr auto get_evens(){
    constexpr auto is_even = [](const int i) constexpr { return i % 2 == 0; };
    constexpr int cnt = [&is_even]() constexpr {
        int cnt = 0;
        auto increment = [&cnt](const auto&) { cnt++; };
        copy_if<arr_t>(is_even, increment);
        return cnt;
    }();

    std::array<int, cnt> result{};
    int idx = 0;
    copy_if<arr_t>(is_even, [&result, &idx](const auto& val) {
        result[idx++] = val; });
    return result;
}

int main()
{
    using arr = std::integer_sequence<int, 11, 22, 33, 44, 55>;
    for (const int i : get_evens<arr>()) {
        std::cout << i << " " << std::endl;
    }
}

Addition suggested by Constantinos Glynos.

From Effective Modern C++ book by Scott Meyers, item 15, p.98:

  • constexpr functions can be used in contexts that demand compile-time constants. If the values of the arguments you pass to a constexpr function in such a context are known during compilation, the result will be computed during compilation. If any of the arguments’ values is not known during compilation, your code will be rejected.
  • When a constexpr function is called with one or more values that are not known during compilation, it acts like a normal function, computing its result at runtime. This means you don’t need two functions to perform the same operation, one for compile-time constants and one for all other values. The constexpr function does it all.
13
  • 1
    upvoted.I hope somebody comes up with a nicer hack, but I doubt it... So I will probably accept your answer in the end. :) Oct 15, 2018 at 8:19
  • 1
    @NoSenseEtAl, take a look at std::integer_sequence. Probably, you can use it here instead of std::array.
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 8:23
  • 1
    The problem of making arr a template parameter is that this won't work for local constexpr arrays.
    – Holt
    Oct 15, 2018 at 8:33
  • 1
    @ConstantinosGlynos, your edit was rejected automatically because of my edit, so I added it myself. Thanks!
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 9:06
  • 2
    @NoSenseEtAl A lots of people are misguided regarding constexpr functions. If a function F is constexpr, F(x) can be evaluated at compile time if x is already a constant expression, but F(x) will be evaluated at runtime if x is only available at runtime, so within F, you cannot consider x as a constant expression. Only the result of F(x) can be considered a constant expression.
    – Holt
    Oct 15, 2018 at 15:14
2

The other answer has a correct work around but I think the reasoning has nothing to do with parameters but instead to do with the lambda capture here:

constexpr int cnt = [/* &arr, */&is_even]() 

Indeed we can test the various scenarios with this code:

#include <array> 
#include <iostream>

template <size_t N>
constexpr int foo(const std::array<int, N>& arr) {
    return [&arr] () { return arr.size(); }();
}

template <size_t N>
constexpr int bar(const std::array<int, N>& arr) {
    int res{};
    for (auto i : arr) {
        res++;
    }
    return res;
}

template <size_t N>
constexpr int baz(const std::array<int, N>& arr)     {
    constexpr int test = [&arr] () constexpr {
        return bar(arr);
    }();
    return test;
}

int main() {
    constexpr std::array<int, 5> arr{11, 22, 33, 44, 55};
    constexpr std::array<int, foo(arr)> test{};
    constexpr std::array<int, bar(arr)> test2{};
    constexpr std::array<int, baz(arr)> test3{};
}   

Note that the line where test3 is initialized fails to compile. This, however, compiles just fine:

template <size_t N>
constexpr int baz(const std::array<int, N>& arr) {
    return bar(arr);
}

So, what's the problem here? Well lambdas are really just glorified functors, and internally it'll look something like this:

struct constexpr_functor {
    const std::array<int, 5>& arr;
    constexpr constexpr_functor(const std::array<int, 5>& test)
        : arr(test) { }
    constexpr int operator()() const {
        return bar(arr);
    }
};
// ...
constexpr constexpr_functor t{arr};
constexpr std::array<int, t()> test3{};

Notice now that we get an error message showing the real problem:

test.cpp:36:33: note: reference to 'arr' is not a constant expression
test.cpp:33:34: note: declared here
    constexpr std::array<int, 5> arr{11, 22, 33, 44, 55};

The other answer quotes Scotts Meyer's book but misinterprets the quotes. The book actually shows several examples of parameters being used in constexpr situations, but the quotes are simply saying that if you pass a non-constexpr parameter, the function can run at compile-time.

3
  • I don't see why lambdas are important here. What you can't do is this: constexpr void foo(int i) { std:array<int, i> arr; }. But this is essentially what OP is doing, cnt playing the role of i. The quotation from Scotts Meyer's book is not very relevant for the answer itself indeed.
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 10:49
  • 1
    The problem is not the lambda, the problem is the use of cnt as a constant expression within get_evens(). All your examples will fail to compile if you try to use the result of the expression within the function themselves. Why? Because a constexpr function must be valid for constexpr but also non-constexpr arguments. The problem in OP's code is that cnt is the result of a computation involving arr, i.e., we could write int cnt = f(arr);, whatever f is (constexpr or not). [...]
    – Holt
    Oct 15, 2018 at 12:20
  • [...] Using cnt in a constant expression would imply that we can compute f(arr) at compile time, which cannot be guaranteed if arr is a parameter, since you cannot force functions to only accept constexpr arguments. The only way to do so is this pass these arguments as template parameters, which can be done in some cases, but has some limitations.
    – Holt
    Oct 15, 2018 at 12:21
2

Following the Evg's suggestion, so passing the numbers as template parameters of a std::integer_sequence, but passing the integer sequence as argument of the get_evens() function, and not as template parameter, you can use the numbers directly inside get_evens().

I mean... you can simplify the get_evens() as follows (EDIT: further simplified following a suggestion from Evg (Thanks!))

template <typename T, T ... Ts>
constexpr auto get_evens (std::integer_sequence<T, Ts...> const &)
 {
   std::array<T, (std::size_t(!(Ts & T{1})) + ...)> result{};

   std::size_t idx = 0;

   ((void)(Ts & 1 || (result[idx++] = Ts, true)), ...);

   return result;
 } 

and you can use it this way

int main()
 {
   using arr = std::integer_sequence<int, 11, 22, 33, 44, 55>;

   for ( const int i : get_evens(arr{}) )
      std::cout << i << " " << std::endl;
 }
3
  • Very nice simplification. My suggestions: 1) remove const &, 2) constexpr std::size_t cnt = (!!(Ts & 1) + ...); or ((Ts % 2 == 0) + ...);.
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 10:59
  • @Evg - Point 2: D'oh! I can't understand how I did't think about it myself. It's the simpler application of C++17 folding. Thanks. Point 1: do you mean the const & for the get_evens() arguments? Why do you think is better without const &?
    – max66
    Oct 15, 2018 at 11:25
  • std::integer_sequence is an empty struct, its size is 1 byte, there is no point in passing it by reference. Optimizer will take care of it anyway, but it's less to type.
    – Evg
    Oct 15, 2018 at 11:33
1
#include <array>
#include <iostream>

static constexpr std::array<int, 5> arr{11, 22, 33, 44, 55};

template <typename C, typename P, typename T>
static constexpr void invoke_if(const C& rng, P p, T target) {
    for (const auto& elem: rng) {
        if (p(elem)){
            target(elem);
        }
    }
}

constexpr bool is_even(int i) {
    return i % 2 == 0;
}

template<std::size_t N>
constexpr std::size_t count_evens(const std::array<int, N>& arr)
{
    std::size_t cnt = 0;
    invoke_if(arr, is_even, [&cnt](auto&&){++cnt;});
    return cnt;
}

template<std::size_t cnt, std::size_t N>
static constexpr auto get_evens(const std::array<int, N>& arr) {
    std::array<int, cnt> result{};
    int idx = 0;
    invoke_if(arr, is_even, [&result, &idx](const auto& val){ result[idx++] = val;});
    return result;
}

int main() {
    // constexpr std::array<int, 5> arr{11, 22, 33, 44, 55};
    for (const int i:get_evens<count_evens(arr)>(arr)) {
        std::cout << i << " " << std::endl;
    }
}

this works in g++, but in clang we get a problem because the begin on an array isn't properly constexpr with at least one library. Or maybe g++ violates the standard and clang does not.

4
  • nit: typo at the end: i assume you mean clang does NOT Oct 15, 2018 at 20:47
  • can you explain how invoke_if goes around the limit mentioned in other answers(that arr is not constexpr inside the body of function) Oct 15, 2018 at 20:51
  • another note: clang 7 compiles your code gcc.godbolt.org/z/r2xair Oct 15, 2018 at 20:56
  • 1
    @nose the trick is the code must be valid in both run and compile time contexts. The trick is I split length from values. Oct 15, 2018 at 21:33
1
template<auto t0, auto...ts>
struct ct_array:
  std::array<decltype(t0) const, 1+sizeof...(ts)>,
  std::integer_sequence<decltype(t0), t0, ts...>
{
  ct_array():std::array<decltype(t0) const, 1+sizeof...(ts)>{{t0, ts...}} {};
};

template<class target, auto X>
struct push;
template<auto X>
struct push<void, X>{using type=ct_array<X>;};
template<auto...elems, auto X>
struct push<ct_array<elems...>, X>{using type=ct_array<elems...,X>;};
template<class target, auto X>
using push_t= typename push<target, X>::type;

template<class target>
struct pop;
template<auto x>
struct pop<ct_array<x>>{using type=void;};
template<auto x0, auto...xs>
struct pop<ct_array<x0, xs...>>{using type=ct_array<xs...>;};
template<class target>
using pop_t=typename pop<target>::type;

template<class lhs, class rhs, class F, class=void>
struct transcribe;
template<class lhs, class rhs, class F>
using transcribe_t = typename transcribe<lhs, rhs, F>::type;

template<auto l0, auto...lhs, class rhs, class F>
struct transcribe<ct_array<l0, lhs...>, rhs, F,
  std::enable_if_t<F{}(l0) && sizeof...(lhs)>
>:
  transcribe<pop_t<ct_array<l0, lhs...>>, push_t<rhs, l0>, F>
{};
template<auto l0, auto...lhs, class rhs, class F>
struct transcribe<ct_array<l0, lhs...>, rhs, F,
  std::enable_if_t<!F{}(l0) && sizeof...(lhs)>
>:
  transcribe<pop_t<ct_array<l0, lhs...>>, rhs, F>
{};
template<auto lhs, class rhs, class F>
struct transcribe<ct_array<lhs>, rhs, F, void>
{
  using type=std::conditional_t< F{}(lhs), push_t<rhs, lhs>, rhs >;
};
template<class lhs, class F>
using filter_t = transcribe_t<lhs, void, F>;

// C++20
//auto is_even = [](auto i)->bool{ return !(i%2); };
struct is_even_t {
  template<class T>
  constexpr bool operator()(T i)const{ return !(i%2); }
};
constexpr is_even_t is_even{};

template<auto...is>
static constexpr auto get_evens(ct_array<is...>) {
  return filter_t< ct_array<is...>, decltype(is_even) >{};
}

Live example.

Test code:

auto arr = ct_array<11, 22, 33, 44, 55>{};
for (const int i : get_evens(arr)) {
    std::cout << i << " " << std::endl;
}
2
  • Is it really necessary to make ct_array inherits from std::integer_sequence in this case? And small issue but this code does not compile in the filtered array is empty.
    – Holt
    Oct 16, 2018 at 8:36
  • @holt true, because I wanted to deduce the type; I could make the type explicit or something, and use the auto detect for a factory template. Integer sequence derivation lets you use it in other compile time contexts. Oct 16, 2018 at 10:58

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