5

A well-known idiom for making no-copy types is to create a base class

struct NoCopy {
   NoCopy(){}
   NoCopy(const NoCopy&) = delete;
   NoCopy& operator=(const NoCopy&) = delete;  
};

And derive from this, like so

struct Foo : NoCopy {
    Foo(){}
};

Which will make the following fail to compile

Foo f;
Foo f2 = f;

But how do I enforce this? Any derived class can do the following

struct Foo2 : NoCopy {
    Foo2(){}
    Foo2(const Foo2&){}
};

Which is perfectly legal but makes no sense, I have now a type which is both copyable and also not copyable (through its base class).

How do I avoid this?

  • 2
    <type_traits> header has those checks. You could use the result of the check in static_assert() or some sort of SFINAE expression. – Yksisarvinen Oct 15 '18 at 10:52
  • Foo2(const Foo2&) calls NoCopy::NoCopy() unfortunately.. – arynaq Oct 15 '18 at 10:53
  • 1
    Can you elaborate why you think this particular situation is likely? Of course the user can write meaningless/ill-formed code. Writing a copy constructor for their class that does not call copy constructors of base classes is an example of that, but even if you somehow prevented that, there are certain levels of malicious/uninformed that you won't be able to counteract. IMO your job is done if you clearly make the base class as uncopyable. – Max Langhof Oct 15 '18 at 10:56
  • @MaxLanghof It might be of interest if you are writing code to be used as library – arynaq Oct 15 '18 at 10:58
  • @arynaq Again (and maybe even especially in that case), if your users are hellbent on shooting themselves in the foot, you can't stop them. If you had a perfectly copyable class (with a default constructor) and they forgot to call its copy constructor in theirs, they'd have the same issue. – Max Langhof Oct 15 '18 at 10:59
8

This is C++. In the world of template meta-programming almost anything is possible. If we make NoCopy a CRTP base, we can add static assertions in its destructor.

template<class C>
struct NoCopy {
   NoCopy(){}
   NoCopy(const NoCopy&) = delete;
   NoCopy& operator=(const NoCopy&) = delete;
   ~NoCopy() noexcept {
       static_assert(std::is_base_of<NoCopy, C>::value, "CRTP not observed");
       static_assert(!std::is_copy_constructible<C>::value, "A non-copyable copyable class? Really?");
   }
};

Here's your code, adapted for a live example.

That's not without a price though, since now the class is not trivially destructible, and as such neither will be any class that derives from it. Whether or not it's acceptable is up to you.


Upon further reflection, if you provide only a single way to intiialize your class, then the default constructor has to be referred to and called. So the static assertion can be moved there, and the type is back to being trivially destructible:

template<class C>
struct NoCopy {
   NoCopy() noexcept {
       static_assert(std::is_base_of<NoCopy, C>::value, "CRTP not observed");
       static_assert(!std::is_copy_constructible<C>::value, "A non-copyable copyable class? Really?");
   }
   NoCopy(const NoCopy&) = delete;
   NoCopy& operator=(const NoCopy&) = delete;
};  

The static assertion fires just the same, as this live example shows.

  • 1
    Note that this can still be defeated. Takes more malicious intent than forgetting a base-class copy constructor, but still. – Max Langhof Oct 15 '18 at 11:13
  • But the derived class can still have copy constructor ... – llllllllll Oct 15 '18 at 11:14
  • 1
    @MaxLanghof - Anything can be defeated. The point of the exercise is to ward off Murphy. Machiavelli always lurks. – StoryTeller Oct 15 '18 at 11:14
  • 1
    Of course. But it's not particularly unlikely that you forget to change the CRTP parameter if you copy an existing derived class and run into this exact issue. It helps, but as you mentioned it has drawbacks. Whether those are worth guarding against this specific scenario is up to the reader to decide. – Max Langhof Oct 15 '18 at 11:17
  • 1
    Thanks for the help with warding off Murphy, which often ends up being me! – arynaq Oct 15 '18 at 11:27
3

If your intent is to guard against people accidentally forgetting to call the NoCopy copy constructor in their own (forbidden-by-naming) copy constructor, I would suggest this:

namespace
{
    struct NotCopyableInitT {};
}    

// You can choose whatever stern words you want here.
NotCopyableInitT initNoCopy() { return {}; }

struct NoCopy {
    explicit NoCopy(NotCopyableInitT){}
    NoCopy(const NoCopy&) = delete;
    NoCopy& operator=(const NoCopy&) = delete;  
};

If they insist to add copyability where it is forbidden, you force them to spell out their own mistake:

struct Foo2 : mylib::NoCopy {
    Foo2() : NoCopy(mylib::initNoCopy()) {}
    // Users have to spell out this line in order to get a copy constructor.
    // That certainly goes beyond being forgetful.
    Foo2(const Foo2&) : NoCopy(mylib::initNoCopy()) {}
};

Demo

For well-behaved users, it's one extra function call in the NoCopy constructor (which at least a linter would tell you to call explicitly anyway).

  • 1
    I like this. In C++17 I'd prefer an inline variable to a function, but otherwise this has a very nice declarative feeling to it. – StoryTeller Oct 15 '18 at 11:36
  • 1
    A downside is that your derived type is no longer trivially constructible. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 15 '18 at 14:45
1

You could simply check that the types used with your API are not copiable:

#include <type_traits>

namespace lib {
template<class NoCopy>
inline constexpr bool copiable_v = std::disjunction<
    std::is_copy_constructible<NoCopy>,
    std::is_copy_assignable<NoCopy>
>::value;

template<class NoCopy>
struct CheckNoCopiable
{
    static_assert(
        copiable_v<NoCopy> == false,
        "Type is copy-assignable or copy-constructible."
    );
};
}

With that tool, your functions could look like:

namespace lib {
template<class NoCopy>
void f(NoCopy&& nc)
{
    CheckNoCopiable<NoCopy>{};

    /* do whatever with nc */
}
}

Full program demo: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/ed0a8f5576a68554:

struct Alice   : lib::NoCopy {}; // nice Alice
struct Bob                   {}; // nice Bob
struct Charlie : lib::NoCopy     // naughty Charly
{
    Charlie()               {};
    Charlie(Charlie const&) {};
    Charlie& operator=(const Charlie&) { return *this; }; 
};

int main()
{
   lib::f(Alice{});
   //lib::f(Bob{});     // error: static assertion failed: Type is copy-assignable or copy-constructible.
   //lib::f(Charlie{}); // error: static assertion failed: Type is copy-assignable or copy-constructible.
}
  • Oh this is interesting, I didn't know you could call static assert like that – arynaq Oct 15 '18 at 12:08

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