I've got a problem converting an "ugly" csv into a "pretty" one. e.g., I have:

something,epochtime,time-human-readable,some,header,for,the,values,here
same,time-a,don-t_care,a,b,,,,
same,time-a,don-t_care,,,,,c,
same,time-a,don-t_care,,,,,,d
same,time-a,don-t_care,,,e,f,,
same,time-b,don-t_care,g,h,,,,
same,time-b,don-t_care,,,i,j,,
same,time-b,don-t_care,,,,,,k
same,time-b,don-t_care,,,,,l,
same,time-c,don-t_care,,,m,n,,
same,time-c,don-t_care,,,,,o,
same,time-c,don-t_care,p,q,,,,
same,time-c,don-t_care,,,,,,r

But what I need is:

something,epochtime,time-human-readable,some,header,for,the,values,here
same,time-a,don-t_care,a,b,e,f,c,d
same,time-b,don-t_care,g,h,i,j,l,k
same,time-c,don-t_care,p,q,m,n,o,r

Data behaviour:

  • Columns in question contain signed-integer or float (except first and third column which are of type string and not part of the problem).
  • Always exactly 1 value per column and epochtime. (One could interpret empty fields as 0 and sum all values in one column belonging to a single epochtime.)
  • Values to one epochtime spread across the same number of lines every time.
  • Values belonging to a single epochtime might always appear spread across the rows in the same pattern (unlike the example) ... but that's not guaranteed.

I tried to solve this problem with my limited skill using sed / awk but to no avail.

Any solution that can be executed by crontab is welcome, while bash / sed / awk / perl / python or any "apt-get install ..." capable command-line tool is preferred. Host OS is XUbuntu 16.04 LTS.

Addendum: (2018-10-16 13:55 UTC)

  • Rows are sorted chronological according to epochtime
  • Values are grouped by epochtime
  • Even though first and third column contain string, it consists of Letters, Numbers and - or _, no whitespace or , --> no string-headache
    i.e. dummy,1539697764,2018-10-16_13-49-24,p,q,,,,
  • 1
    The first line has a,b only. The first time the third field has something is e and you use that to fill the slot in the first line. But, next comes i in that field, a few lines down. Do you always use the first that comes along? Then, the line with p,q uses m to fill the third field-- which appeared in an earlier line. What is the general rule? If an item to fill a field has been seen (and wasn't used) then use that one, otherwise the first next? What when there are more unused items for a field, which ones do you use? Can one item be re-used to fill spots in multiple lines? – zdim Oct 15 at 21:53
  • Could you include the code you have tried in your question, please? – oguzismail Oct 15 at 22:55
  • @zdim, Combine rows with same value in second field. – ikegami Oct 16 at 0:18
  • @ikegami The row with e that's used to fill the first row (a,b) has nothing in the second field? Or am I missing stuff ...? – zdim Oct 16 at 0:28
  • @zdim It looks like everything resets when there's a new value in the time column. – Shawn Oct 16 at 0:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted
$ cat tst.awk
BEGIN { FS=OFS="," }
$2 != prev { if (NR>1) prt(); prev=$2 }
{
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
        if ($i != "") {
            rec[i] = $i
        }
    }
}
END { prt() }
function prt() {
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
        printf "%s%s", rec[i], (i<NF ? OFS : ORS)
    }
    delete rec
}

$ awk -f tst.awk file
something,epochtime,time-human-readable,some,header,for,the,values,here
same,time-a,don-t_care,a,b,e,f,c,d
same,time-b,don-t_care,g,h,i,j,l,k
same,time-c,don-t_care,p,q,m,n,o,r

Perl version, using a CSV parser instead of naive splitting on commas in order to be more robust - you mention some of the columns are strings, so this will handle cases where they have embedded commas and such.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
# Install the following non-core modules through your
# OS package manager or favorite CPAN client.
use List::MoreUtils qw/pairwise/;
use Text::CSV;

my $csv = Text::CSV->new({ auto_diag => 2, blank_is_undef => 1 });
my $header = <>;
print $header;
my $merged = $csv->getline(\*ARGV);
while (my $cols = $csv->getline(\*ARGV)) {
  if ($merged->[1] ne $cols->[1]) {
    $csv->say(\*STDOUT, $merged);
    $merged = $cols;
  } else {
    $merged = [ pairwise { $a // $b } @$merged, @$cols ];
  }
}
$csv->say(\*STDOUT, $merged);

running it:

$ perl merge.pl data.csv
something,epochtime,time-human-readable,some,header,for,the,values,here
same,time-a,don-t_care,a,b,e,f,c,d
same,time-b,don-t_care,g,h,i,j,l,k
same,time-c,don-t_care,p,q,m,n,o,r

Another Perl solution:

open $CSV, "<" , "ugly.csv";
@R=();
  while (<$CSV>) {
      if ($.==1 ) { print ; next; }
      chomp;
      @F=split(/,/,$_);
      $k=join(",",@F[0..2]);
      if( $k ne $prevk ) { @R=() }
      push(@R,@F[3..9],"|");
      $hash{"$k"}=join(",",@R);
      $prevk=$k;
    }
foreach $val (sort keys %hash)
{
 @arr=split(/\|/,$hash{$val});
 $x=join("",reverse sort @arr);
 $x=~s/(^[,])|([,]{2,})/$1 eq "," ? "" : ","/eg;
 print "$val,$x\n";
}

Shell Output:

$ perl -f ugly_csv.pl
something,epochtime,time-human-readable,some,header,for,the,values,here
same,time-a,don-t_care,a,b,e,f,c,d,
same,time-b,don-t_care,g,h,i,j,l,k,
same,time-c,don-t_care,p,q,m,n,o,r,

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