2

Consider the below function:

It takes a list of lists as an input and finds all combinations of elements from each of those lists.

def product(llist):
    result = [[]]

    for lst in llist:
        result = [x + [y] for x in result for y in lst]

    return result

For eg:

product([[1,2], [3], [4,5]])

would return:

[[1, 3, 4], [1, 3, 5], [2, 3, 4], [2, 3, 5]]

I'm trying to understand how this function works and hence trying to expand the list comprehension.

Here's a try:

def product2(llist):
    result = [[]]
    for lst in llist:
        for x in result:
            result = []
            for y in lst:
                result.append(x+[y])

    return result

this doesn't give me the correct result, it returns:

[[2, 3, 4], [2, 3, 5]]

and I understand this incorrect result as per the definition of product2. But I'm not able to expand the original product function to understand how it is working.

Can someone elaborate the nested list comprehension in product function?

2 Answers 2

3

The list comprehension is creating a new list for each element in lst, and creates further new lists by combining this small single element list with all the lists that are already in result.

So, for example if result = [ [1, 2], [3, 4] ] and lst = [10, 11], new result would be [[1, 2, 10], [1, 2, 11], [3, 4, 10], [3, 4, 11]].

And it's doing this for each lst in llist:

def product2(llist):
    result = [[]]
    for lst in llist:
        new_result = [] # let's manually build out new result
        for existing in result:            
            for element in lst:
                new_result.append(existing + [element])
        result = new_result # update result for next lst
    return result
2
  • 1
    very nice I was missing that last peice Oct 15, 2018 at 23:36
  • @vash_the_stampede thanks. It's easy to overlook that it's actually 3 loops.
    – slider
    Oct 15, 2018 at 23:40
1

It helps if you print the partial values of result, like this:

def product(llist):
    result = [[]]

    for lst in llist:
        result = [x + [y] for x in result for y in lst]
        print(result)

    return result

First of all, the innner list of results is empty, so it will create a new inner list for each element in the first inner list passed:

[[1], [2]]

Then in the second pass, each inner list in the result will be replaced by itself plus each element in the second inner list passed as parameter:

[[1, 3], [2, 3]]

And then, when you have a inner parameter list with more than one element, it will replicate the current existing inner lists in the result

[[1, 3, 4], [1, 3, 5], [2, 3, 4], [2, 3, 5]]

It happens like this because in one pass through the list comprehension the list in question will not be updated. It will be updated only at the end of the comprehension.

Another way you could see this is like a grid:

------------------
|    |  1  |  2  |
------------------
| [] | [1] | [2] |
------------------

result = [[1],[2]]

---------------
|     |   3   |
---------------
| [1] | [1,3] |
---------------
| [2] | [2,3] |
---------------

result = [[1,3],[2,3]]

-----------------------------
|       |    4    |    5    |
-----------------------------
| [1,3] | [1,3,4] | [1,3,5] |
-----------------------------
| [2,3] | [2,3,4] | [2,3,5] |
-----------------------------

result = [[1,3,4],[2,3,4],[1,3,5],[2,3,5]]

With this in mind, the version without comprehension will need a temporary variable to hold the updated values:

def product2(llist):
    result = [[]]
    for lst in llist:
        temp_res = []
        for x in result:
            for y in lst:
                temp_res.append(x+[y])
        result = temp_res

    return result

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