1

Having some issues coming up with an algorithm to create a list of sequences such that every distinct pair is counted at a repeat number of times, where every element in the sequence can only have 1 of 2 possible other elements in it.

To be more clear, if I have the grammar such that the alphabet is [A, B, C, D, E, F]:

A -> B, E

B -> C, D

C -> A, F

D -> F, B

E -> D, A

F -> E, C

means the only possible pairs I can/should have are [(A, B), (A, E), (B, C), (B, D), (C, A), (C, F), (D, F), (D, B), (E, D), (E, A), (F, E), (F, C)].

So for example, a sequence could look something like:

A, B, D, F, E, A, E, D, F, E, A, E, ...

(A, B), (B, D), (E, D) have all occurred once so far and (A, E), (E, A), (F, E), (D, F) are no longer usable (as we've used them twice). We continue this pattern until we have no more usable pairs. For instance, the next element in the above sequence must be D, since we've exhausted the option (E, A).

From that, I could want to get all sequences starting with A up to a length of 24 that follows the above grammar, such that every pair in the sequence is repeated exactly twice.

My initial idea was to just make a bunch of nodes, then perform a generic DFS/BFS on it to get every path while counting the number of pairs that I see while going down the tree, return when there's too many pairs and add to a list of paths when I've reached a depth of 24. Are there better ways to get this done? I feel like I'm overthinking it.

(Note: It could also be a variable depth, and I could start with any element in the alphabet.)

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  • 1
    Before we actually do that do we know the amount of possibilities? it could be larger than your memory ... Otherwise this could just be a recursion problem where for set length you would have a counter list of 12 elements of 2 that decreases each time a sequence is used. And just brute force the list - it will be quick enough if your possibility doesn't outrun your memory.
    – Rocky Li
    Oct 16 '18 at 2:29
  • I don't think you can achieve a recursive option, since the amount of possibilities could be variable (someone could ask for a certain depth). For the sake of the problem, let's say the sequence length is [0, 48].
    – MisterHuac
    Oct 16 '18 at 2:35
  • Since you specified we need each pair of sequence to repeat exactly twice, the recursion starts from there.
    – Rocky Li
    Oct 16 '18 at 2:44
  • My mistake- I had meant to say that the pair could repeat a user-specified number of times, but I had been trying to solve specifically if it were only twice and generalize from there
    – MisterHuac
    Oct 16 '18 at 2:50
  • 2
    I like Rocky Li's idea of maintaining a counter. You can do this with recursive backtracking. At each step, with that grammar, you have at most 2 choices, so the number of sequences of length 24 starting at A is only 2^23 (around 8 million); I assume that restricting the number of times a pair can be used reduces that number considerably.
    – PM 2Ring
    Oct 16 '18 at 3:01
3

Here's a recursive generator that makes your sequences. It was even easier than I thought: no backtracking required. :) To save memory, we use a single dict counts to keep track of the counts of each pair. We increment the count before the recursive call, and reset it after the recursive call.

The sequence length needs to be 25 to get each of the 12 pairs exactly twice in a sequence. The total number of sequences starting with a given letter is 18954.

grammar = {
    'A': 'BE',
    'B': 'CD',
    'C': 'AF',
    'D': 'BF',
    'E': 'AD',
    'F': 'CE',
}

pairs = [k + c for k, v in grammar.items() for c in v]
counts = dict.fromkeys(pairs, 0)

maxcount = 2
total_len = 25

def sequences(seq):
    if len(seq) == total_len:
        yield seq
        return

    k = seq[-1]
    for c in grammar[k]:
        pair = k + c
        if counts[pair] < maxcount:
            counts[pair] += 1
            yield from sequences(seq + c)
            counts[pair] -= 1

for i, seq in enumerate(sequences('A'), 1):
    print(i, seq)   

some output

1 ABCABCAEAEDBDBDFCFCFEDFEA
2 ABCABCAEAEDBDBDFCFEDFCFEA
3 ABCABCAEAEDBDBDFEDFCFCFEA
4 ABCABCAEAEDBDFCFCFEDBDFEA
5 ABCABCAEAEDBDFCFEDBDFCFEA
6 ABCABCAEAEDBDFEDBDFCFCFEA
7 ABCABCAEAEDFCFCFEDBDBDFEA
8 ABCABCAEAEDFCFEDBDBDFCFEA
9 ABCABCAEAEDFEDBDBDFCFCFEA
10 ABCABCAEDBDBDFCFCFEAEDFEA

To get a quick count of the sequences without printing them all, you can do

print(sum(1 for _ in sequences('A')))

That runs in under 2 seconds on my old 2GHz 32 bit machine, running Python 3.6.0


Note that increasing maxcount considerably increases the number of sequences. Eg, for total_len = 19, maxcount = 2, the total number of sequences is 20622, for total_len = 19, maxcount = 3, the total number of sequences is 169192.

2
  • We got the same number, 18954 ;D Oct 16 '18 at 5:19
  • @MateenUlhaq That's reassuring. :)
    – PM 2Ring
    Oct 16 '18 at 5:25
1

Let's start with a simple method that disregards the max_count=2 restriction:

from pprint import pprint
from collections import defaultdict

def list_cycles(grammar, parent, length):
    if length == 1:
        return [parent]

    return [parent + x
        for node in grammar[parent]
        for x in list_cycles(grammar, node, length - 1)]

grammar = {
    'A': ['B', 'E'],
    'B': ['C', 'D'],
    'C': ['A', 'F'],
    'D': ['F', 'B'],
    'E': ['D', 'A'],
    'F': ['E', 'C'],
    }

cycles = list_cycles(grammar, 'A', 6)
print(f'{len(cycles)}\n')
pprint(cycles)

Which outputs:

32

['ABCABC',
 'ABCABD',
 'ABCAED',
 'ABCAEA',
 'ABCFED',
 'ABCFEA',
 'ABCFCA',
 'ABCFCF',
 'ABDFED',
 'ABDFEA',
 'ABDFCA',
 'ABDFCF',
 'ABDBCA',
 'ABDBCF',
 'ABDBDF',
 'ABDBDB',
 'AEDFED',
 'AEDFEA',
 'AEDFCA',
 'AEDFCF',
 'AEDBCA',
 'AEDBCF',
 'AEDBDF',
 'AEDBDB',
 'AEABCA',
 'AEABCF',
 'AEABDF',
 'AEABDB',
 'AEAEDF',
 'AEAEDB',
 'AEAEAB',
 'AEAEAE']

Our requirements require that we get rid of entries like 'AEAEAE'. So let's write a simple DFS-like implementation:

from pprint import pprint
from collections import defaultdict

def adjusted_counts(counts, item):
    counts = counts.copy()
    counts[item] += 1
    return counts

def list_cycles(grammar, max_count, parent, length, counts):
    if length == 1:
        return [parent]

    return [parent + x
        for node in grammar[parent]
        for x in list_cycles(grammar, max_count, node, length - 1,
            adjusted_counts(counts, parent + node))
        if counts[parent + node] < max_count]

grammar = {
    'A': ['B', 'E'],
    'B': ['C', 'D'],
    'C': ['A', 'F'],
    'D': ['F', 'B'],
    'E': ['D', 'A'],
    'F': ['E', 'C'],
    }

cycles = list_cycles(grammar, 2, 'A', 6, defaultdict(int))
print(f'{len(cycles)}\n')
pprint(cycles)

Which outputs:

31

['ABCABC',
 'ABCABD',
 'ABCAED',
 'ABCAEA',
 'ABCFED',
 'ABCFEA',
 'ABCFCA',
 'ABCFCF',
 'ABDFED',
 'ABDFEA',
 'ABDFCA',
 'ABDFCF',
 'ABDBCA',
 'ABDBCF',
 'ABDBDF',
 'ABDBDB',
 'AEDFED',
 'AEDFEA',
 'AEDFCA',
 'AEDFCF',
 'AEDBCA',
 'AEDBCF',
 'AEDBDF',
 'AEDBDB',
 'AEABCA',
 'AEABCF',
 'AEABDF',
 'AEABDB',
 'AEAEDF',
 'AEAEDB',
 'AEAEAB']

Finally, running:

cycles = list_cycles(grammar, 2, 'A', 24, defaultdict(int))
print(len(cycles))

Gives:

18954

Concluding thoughts:

  • Performance might be improved via generators like @PM 2Ring's version
  • Performance might be further improved via a more clever algorithm that only works for this specific grammar, max_count=2, and length=24. One that I was thinking about was: enumerate all permutations which use every pair only once. Then, attempt to insert connecting cycles once in between the various positions.
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  • 1
    Generators definitely help with tasks like this, but not because of their speed: a generator is (usually) slightly slower than an equivalent list based approach. Their big benefit is the smaller memory footprint. A major time (and RAM) sink in your version is all of those counts copies, which take time to allocate, populate, and deallocate. Eg, for max_count=2, length=17 your code creates 131070 counts to generate 11933 sequences. Python is very efficient at using memory: it manages its own memory pools, and recycles stuff when it can, but creating a huge pile of objects adds up.
    – PM 2Ring
    Oct 16 '18 at 5:55
  • Hmmm, so I got rid of all the copying, but it's still dozens of times slower than your implementation. I have a feeling it might have to do with the number of list concatenations (9704222...!) and the direction of their additions (lfold vs rfold). Additionally, I'm not making use of list.append. Oct 16 '18 at 6:49

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