4

I understand the error message. I know that I cannot access non-static methods in a static context. But why I can do the following:

Predicate<String> t = String::isEmpty; // this works

When isEmpty() is a non-static method for the class String? Look at the following example class. I understand the logic to not allow TestLamba::isEmptyTest; but what I don't understand is why String:isEmpty can break this rule:

import java.util.function.Predicate;

public class TestLamba {

    public static void main(String... args) {

        Predicate<String> t = String::isEmpty; // this works
        Predicate<String> t2 = TestLamba::isEmptyTest; // this doesn't
    }

    public boolean isEmptyTest() {
        return true;
    }

}

This is the source for String.isEmpty. It's a pretty common method and you can see that it is not static:

public boolean isEmpty() {
    return this.value.length == 0;
}
7
  • 6
    Where do you think the String from Predicate<String> would go when using TestLamba::isEmptyTest? – Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 16 '18 at 5:07
  • 1
    You are accessing TestLamba's non-static method in TestLamba's static method; and accessing String's non-static method in TestLamba's static method instead of accessing String's non-static method in String's static method. – Ricky Mo Oct 16 '18 at 5:07
  • If you subclass String and create a static method that access String::isEmpty, you should get your expected outcome – Ricky Mo Oct 16 '18 at 5:09
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    @RickyMo String cannot be subclassed. – Andreas Oct 16 '18 at 5:09
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    Note that a static method reference is a different concept than accessing non-static methods from a static context. Like nullpointer already said, String::isEmpty is equal to (String t) -> t.isEmpty(), and if you're writing it like this, there's nothing static at all. – MC Emperor Oct 16 '18 at 5:50
6

isEmpty is the function of String Class and isEmptyTest is the function of TestLamba class.

import java.util.function.Predicate;

public class TestLamba {

    public static void main(String... args) {

        Predicate<String> t = String::isEmpty; // this works
        Predicate<TestLamba > t2 = TestLamba::isEmptyTest; //Now this will work
    }

    public boolean isEmptyTest() {
        return true;
    }

}
1
  • 2
    Didn't realize that the generic parameter was the reference class. Thanks! – Mariano L Oct 16 '18 at 5:11

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