5

I sometimes want to show my students that local variables have to be initialized before use. But on some occasions they get the initial value of zero without being initialized. So my students don't believe me. For example in this code.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void){
     int sum;
     sum += 5;
     printf("%d", sum);
     return 0;
}

Sometimes output is 5. To demonstrate the undefined behaviour of not initialising the variable sum to zero I am looking for an example.

  • There's no guaranteed way to do it. – Tom Karzes Oct 16 '18 at 5:48
  • What do you mean by "sometimes"? And why is that not convincing enough? If it is not "always" it is enough demonstration of the problem, isn't it? – Yunnosch Oct 16 '18 at 6:01
  • 1
    @autistic Please, when addressing other users, remember that we have a code of conduct. – Bob__ Oct 16 '18 at 8:18
  • 2
    @autistic: Clang compiles it with default options, and the issues in compiling it do not in any way interfere with understanding the question. You could easily fix the issue you complain about with an edit to the question, and it is better for the community to correct a question than to lose it. Having code that fairly reliably demonstrated uninitialized objects do not default to zero could be a useful teaching tool. – Eric Postpischil Oct 17 '18 at 1:14
  • @autistic I did not ask for written resources. I am looking for a simple example to demonstrate that undefined behaviour. None of your resources does that. – Felix Yah Batta Man Oct 19 '18 at 6:52
5

Pointing to standards is good. But I understand your desire to show an example to your students. I'm not sure about the best way; but to increase your chances of seeing the undefined behavior, you can declare multiple variables that cannot easily be optimized away by the compiler.

#include <stdio.h>
void main(){
    int sum1;
    int sum2;
    int sum3;
    int sum4;
    int sum5;
    int sum6;
    int sum7;
    int sum8;
    int sum9;
    int sum=sum1+sum2+sum3+sum4+sum5+sum6+sum7+sum8+sum9;
    printf("%d\n",sum);
}

On my system; recent Ubuntu, with recent GCC this produces incorrect results on every run, whereas your original example always produced 5. But I can't make any guarantees for your system.

  • good one, on MacOS, results also incorrect on every run. – Nick S Oct 16 '18 at 6:18
  • 1
    What do you mean with "incorrect"? How could the result be incorrect? There is no "correct" value to print. That's the point after all. – Gerhardh Oct 17 '18 at 12:15
  • 1
    @Gerhardh, yeah I was thinking about editing that before someone commented about it. But I meant incorrect as in not the expected result, if you are working under the assumption of OPs students who expected automatic zero initialization. – visibleman Oct 17 '18 at 13:12
3

Memory is usually initialized to zero when a process is started. Otherwise, you would get old memory contents from another process, which would be a security risk. Because of this, code like this will, in my experience, usually print zero:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    int x;
    printf("%d\n", x);
}

You have a greater chance to get non-zero results if you use memory that has been used by your own process. For example, I just got non-zero printouts with this program:

#include <stdio.h>

void f(void) {
    int x;
    printf("%d\n", x);
}

int main(void) {
    f();
    f();
    f();
}

But remember that according to the standard, the contents of an uninitialized local variable (with storage class auto) is undefined, so a compiler is allowed to always set its variables to zero. Or -4.

  • Out of curiosity, have you ever done any programming for a freestanding implementation, particularly a single-task environment (as opposed to the multi-user, multi-tasking Unixes and Windows that are common)? Because some of these claims are invalid... i.e. Is memory "usually initialized to zero when a process is started" when programming for a Java smartcard (i.e. a SIM card)? I would assume since the memory on those is NAND flash, they probably purposefully don't initialise it to zero when your program starts. – autistic Oct 16 '18 at 6:40
  • 2
    Also a lot of desktop compilers stupidly zero-out the stack when in debug build, so that all bugs related to uninitialized variables only surface in release build. – Lundin Oct 16 '18 at 6:41
  • @autistic: Yes, I agree with that. But in a teaching context, as in the OP's question, you typically do have a Windows or Unix laptop or desktop computer. – Thomas Padron-McCarthy Oct 16 '18 at 7:06
  • @ThomasPadron-McCarthy Nowadays C is used mostly for programming the kernel and embedded devices, perhaps occasionally some compiler (because flex/yacc etc all generate skeleton C code). User interface development is largely Javascript (look at what you're using now), though I guess you could say C++ is often used for games... and to be clear, there are far more mobile phones and tablets on the planet than desktops and laptops... and we're not counting the routers, right? – autistic Oct 16 '18 at 7:18
1

How about explicitly setting the value for a certain position and reading it from another uninitialized variable pointing at the same position?

#include <stdio.h>

void foo()
{
    int x = 1234;
}

void bar()
{
    int y;
    printf("%d\n", y);
}

int main()
{
    foo();
    bar(); /* Will print out 1234 */
}
0

It would be better to not prove your students something by your self instead use C standards.

C99 section 6.7.8 Initialization:

If an object that has automatic storage duration is not initialized explicitly, its value is indeterminate.

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