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I am trying the following perl code:

 use strict;
 use warnings;
 use Scalar::Util ("looks_like_number"); 
 my $color;
 if (undef $color)
 {
 my $color = $ARGV[0];
 }
 print "$0\n";
 print "$ARGV[0]\n";
 my @colors = ("blue", "yellow", "brown", "white");
 print "Please select a num:\n";
 foreach my $i (0..$#colors)
 {
 my $j = $i+1;
 print " $j $colors[$i]\n"; 
 }

 my $num = <STDIN>;
 chomp($num);
 if (looks_like_number($num) and defined $colors[$num-1])
 {
 $color = $colors[$num-1];
 }

 else
 {
 print "Bad Selection\n";
 }
 print "selected color is $color\n";       

I want to select any number for the corresponding color choice or I should be able to provide a value of color by $color variable through command line, I am trying to run it in windows cmd using ' perl [C:/scriptname.pl] [color] ' but its not taking the argument but when I am printing ARGV[0] it is showing the argument being passed correctly. so what is the issue with my 'if (undef ARGV[0])' statement that its not getting executed.

2

You are declaring the variable $color twice:

 my $color;
 if (undef $color)
 {
     my $color = $ARGV[0];
 }

The second my $color will create a second binding of the name $color and the value you assign to it and that binding will not be visibile outside of the scope, the enclosing curly brackets.

The expression

 if (undef $color)

does not do what you intend it to do. undef will always set a value to undef. You want to use defined instead.

After applying those two changes, the code could look like:

 my $color;
 if (! defined $color)
 {
     $color = $ARGV[0];
 }
  • 1
    That's good answer, but that if is still redundant - $color isn't initialized, so it's always undefined, so that code could be simplified to my $color = $ARGV[0]; – el.pescado Oct 16 '18 at 9:20
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my $color;
if (undef $color)
{
my $color = $ARGV[0];
}

This looks rather strange. In line 1 you declare a scalar variable called $color. In line 2, you call undef() on that variable which replaces the contents of $color with undef() (that's unnecessary as a newly-declared Perl scalar will always contain undef()). This expression will return undef, which is false, so the code in your if block is never executed.

In line 4, you declare a new variable, also called $color and set that to $ARGV[0]. There are two problems with this. Firstly, that line will never be executed for the reasons explained in the previous paragraph. And, secondly, your new $color variable will cease to exist once you leave the block, so you would never see the effect of this change.

I think the main problem here is that you have confused undef() with defined(). undef() will always give a variable an undefined values, but I suspect you wanted defined() which tells you whether or not a variable contains a defined value.

What you probably wanted was:

my $color;

if (!defined $color) {
  $color = $ARGV[0];
}

Which can be written as:

my $color //= $ARGV[0];

But it's still slightly confusing as it's not clear why you think $color could ever be defined immediately after being declared.

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