91

I've got the following simple script that plots a graph:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

T = np.array([6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12])
power = np.array([1.53E+03, 5.92E+02, 2.04E+02, 7.24E+01, 2.72E+01, 1.10E+01, 4.70E+00])

plt.plot(T,power)
plt.show()

As it is now, the line goes straight from point to point which looks ok, but could be better in my opinion. What I want is to smooth the line between the points. In Gnuplot I would have plotted with smooth cplines.

Is there an easy way to do this in PyPlot? I've found some tutorials, but they all seem rather complex.

136

You could use scipy.interpolate.spline to smooth out your data yourself:

from scipy.interpolate import spline

xnew = np.linspace(T.min(),T.max(),300) #300 represents number of points to make between T.min and T.max

power_smooth = spline(T,power,xnew)

plt.plot(xnew,power_smooth)
plt.show()

spline is deprecated in scipy 0.19.0, use Bspline class instead.

Switching from spline to Bspline isn't a straightforward copy/paste and requires a little tweaking:

from scipy.interpolate import make_interp_spline, BSpline

xnew = np.linspace(T.min(),T.max(),300) #300 represents number of points to make between T.min and T.max

spl = make_interp_spline(T, power, k=3) #BSpline object
power_smooth = spl(xnew)

plt.plot(xnew,power_smooth)
plt.show()

Before: screenshot 1

After: screenshot 2

  • 2
    Haha, that wasn't difficult. Cheers! :) Just a note for others that might be looking: I had to import scipy to use linspace(). – Paul Mar 12 '11 at 17:48
  • Oops, sorry, should have used np.linspace. Corrected in my answer. – Olivier Verdier Mar 12 '11 at 19:31
  • 2
    What is the magic number 300? – tommy.carstensen Jul 20 '15 at 10:58
  • 2
    The 300 is how many points to make between T.min() and T.max(). I used 1000 and it looks the same. Try with 5 though and you'll see a difference. – CornSmith Sep 20 '15 at 6:24
  • 2
    spline is deprecated! spline is deprecated in scipy 0.19.0, use BSpline class instead: from scipy.interpolate import BSpline – user890739 Apr 20 '18 at 16:24
9

For this example spline works well, but if the function is not smooth inherently and you want to have smoothed version you can also try:

from scipy.ndimage.filters import gaussian_filter1d

ysmoothed = gaussian_filter1d(y, sigma=2)
plt.plot(x, ysmoothed)
plt.show()

if you increase sigma you can get a more smoothed function.

Proceed with caution with this one. It modifies the original values and may not be what you want.

  • 3
    Proceed with caution with this one. It modifies the original values and may not be what you want. – tartaruga_casco_mole Nov 27 '18 at 1:19
6

I presume you mean curve-fitting and not anti-aliasing from the context of your question. PyPlot doesn't have any built-in support for this, but you can easily implement some basic curve-fitting yourself, like the code seen here, or if you're using GuiQwt it has a curve fitting module. (You could probably also steal the code from SciPy to do this as well).

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