I have to process a whole dataframe with some hundered thousands rows, but I can simplify it as below:

df = pd.DataFrame([
('a', 1, 1),
('a', 0, 0),
('a', 0, 1),
('b', 0, 0),
('b', 1, 0),
('b', 0, 1),
('c', 1, 1),
('c', 1, 0),
('c', 1, 0)
], columns=['A', 'B', 'C'])

print (df)

   A  B  C
0  a  1  1
1  a  0  0
2  a  0  1
3  b  0  0
4  b  1  0
5  b  0  1
6  c  1  1
7  c  1  0
8  c  1  0

My goal it to flatten the columns "B" and "C" based on the label they have in the "A" column

   A  B_1  B_2  B_3  C_1  C_2  C_3
0  a    1    0    0    1    0    1
3  b    0    1    0    0    0    1
6  c    1    1    1    1    0    0

The code I wrote gives the result I want, but it is pretty slow as it uses a simple for loop on the unique labels. The solution I see is to write some vectorized function that optimize my code. Anyone has some idea? Below I append the code.

added_col = ['B_1', 'B_2', 'B_3', 'C_1', 'C_2', 'C_3']

new_df = df.drop(['B', 'C'], axis=1).copy()
new_df = new_df.iloc[[x for x in range(0, len(df), 3)], :]
new_df = pd.concat([new_df,pd.DataFrame(columns=added_col)], sort=False)

for e, elem in new_df['A'].iteritems():
    new_df.loc[e, added_col] = df[df['A'] == elem].loc[:,['B','C']].T.values.flatten()
  • 1
    upvote for a nicely constructed question. :) – anky_91 Oct 16 at 16:09
  • My instinct suggests that building a new array as you go, instead of calling flatten() each iteration, would speed things up considerably. – Dave Nov 8 at 17:19
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here is one way:

# create a row number by group
df['rn'] = df.groupby('A').cumcount() + 1

# pivot the table
new_df = df.set_index(['A', 'rn']).unstack()

# rename columns
new_df.columns = [x + '_' + str(y) for (x, y) in new_df.columns]

new_df.reset_index()
#   A  B_1  B_2  B_3  C_1  C_2  C_3
#0  a    1    0    0    1    0    1
#1  b    0    1    0    0    0    1
#2  c    1    1    1    1    0    0
  • 5
    newdf.columns.map('{0[0]}_{0[1]}'.format) – W-B Oct 16 at 16:15

In an effort to improve performance, I've used numba and numpy assignment

from numba import njit

@njit
def f(i, vals, n, m, k):

  out = np.empty((n, k, m), vals.dtype)
  out.fill(0)

  c = np.zeros(n, np.int64)

  for j in range(len(i)):
    x = i[j]
    out[x, :, c[x]] = vals[j]
    c[x] += 1

  return out.reshape(n, m * k)


d0 = df.drop('A', 1)
cols = [*d0]

i, r = pd.factorize(df.A)

n = len(r)
m = np.bincount(i).max()
k = len(cols)

vals = d0.values

pd.DataFrame(
    f(i, vals, n, m, k),
    pd.Index(r, name='A'),
    [f"{c}_{i}" for c in cols for i in range(1, m + 1)]
).reset_index()

   A  B_1  B_2  B_3  C_1  C_2  C_3
0  a    1    0    0    1    0    1
1  b    0    1    0    0    0    1
2  c    1    1    1    1    0    0

Another approach using groupby and ravel()

>>> df.groupby('A')[['B','C']].apply(lambda s: pd.Series(s.T.values.ravel(), 
                                                         index=[f'{x}_{i}' for x in s.columns for i in range(1, len(s)+1)]))

    B_1 B_2 B_3 C_1 C_2 C_3
A                       
a   1   0   0   1   0   1
b   0   1   0   0   0   1
c   1   1   1   1   0   0

Modify your index by using %

df.index=df.index%3+1
df.set_index('A',append=True,inplace=True)
newdf=df.unstack(level=0)
newdf.columns=newdf.columns.map('{0[0]}_{0[1]}'.format)
newdf
Out[291]: 
   B_1  B_2  B_3  C_1  C_2  C_3
A                              
a    1    0    0    1    0    1
b    0    1    0    0    0    1
c    1    1    1    1    0    0

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.