159

I've been trying to get an efficient regex for IPv4 validation, but without much luck. It seemed at one point I had had it with (25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}, but it produces some strange results:

$ grep --version
grep (GNU grep) 2.7
$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.1.1
192.168.1.1
$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.1.255
192.168.1.255
$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.255.255
$ grep -E '\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?(\.|$)){4}\b' <<< 192.168.1.2555
192.168.1.2555

I did a search to see if this had already been asked and answered, but other answers appear to simply show how to determine 4 groups of 1-3 numbers, or do not work for me.

2
  • 17
    Don't forget that A, and A.B, and A.B.C are valid forms of IP address as well as A.B.C.D. Seriously. Try ping 2130706433 and ping 127.1 for a giggle.
    – dty
    Mar 12, 2011 at 17:47
  • 1
    My variant online regexr.com/39hqf
    – Enginer
    Sep 22, 2014 at 7:41

44 Answers 44

1
2
0

Following is the regex expression to validate the IP-Address.

^((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)$
0

Easy way

((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[1][0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]{0,1})\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[1][0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]{0,1})

Demo

0

This one matches only valid IPs (no prepended 0's, but it will match octets from 0-255 regardless of their 'function' [ie reserved, private, etc]) and allows for inline matching, where there may be spaces before and/or after the IP, or when using CIDR notation.

grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)'

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< '10.0.1.2'
10.0.1.2

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< 'ip address 10.0.1.2'
ip address 10.0.1.2

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< 'ip address 10.0.1.2 255.255.255.255'
ip address 10.0.1.2 255.255.255.255

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< 'ip address 10.0.1.2/32'
ip address 10.0.1.2/32

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< 'ip address 10.0.1.2.32'
$

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< 'ip address10.0.1.2'
$

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< '10.0.1.256'
$

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< '0.0.0.0'
0.0.0.0

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< '255.255.255.255'
255.255.255.255

$ grep -E '(^| )((([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])($| |/)' <<< '255.255.255.256'
$

Of course, in cases where the IP is inline, you can use grep option "-o" and your preference of whitespace trimmer if you just want the whole IP and nothing but the IP.

For those of us using python, the equivalent is roughly:

>>> ipv4_regex = re.compile(r'(^| )((?:[1-9]?\d|1\d{2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.){3}(?:[1-9]?\d|1\d{2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])($| |/)')
>>> ipv4_regex.search('ip address 10.1.2.3/32')
<re.Match object; span=(10, 20), match=' 10.1.2.3/'>

If you're picky (lazy) like me, you probably would prefer to use grouping to get the whole IP and nothing but the IP, or the CIDR and nothing but the CIDR or some combination thereof. We can use (?P) syntax to name our groups for easier reference.

>>> ipv4_regex = re.compile(r'(?:^| )(?P<address>((?:[1-9]?\d|1\d{2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.){3}(?:[1-9]?\d|1\d{2}|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5]))(?P<slash>/)?(?(slash)(?P<cidr>[0-9]|[12][0-9]|3[0-2]))(?:$| )')
>>> match = ipv4_regex.search('ip address 10.0.1.2/32')
>>> match.group('address')
'10.0.1.2'
>>> match.group('cidr')
'32'
>>> "".join((match.group('address'), match.group('slash'), match.group('cidr')))
'10.0.1.2/32'

There's ways of not using just regex, of course. Here's some conditions that you could check (this one doesn't find inline, just validates the passed address is valid).

First check is that each char in the address is a digit or a '.'

Next checking that there are exactly 3 '.'

The next two checks check that each octet is between 0 and 255.

And the last check is that no octets are prepended with a '0'

def validate_ipv4_address(address):
    return all(re.match('\.|\d', c) for c in address) \
        and address.count('.') == 3 \
        and all(0 <= int(octet) <= 255 for octet in address.split('.')) \
        and all((len(bin(int(octet))) <= 10 for octet in address.split('.'))) \
        and all(len(octet) == 1 or d[0] != '0' for octet in address.split('.'))


>>> validate_ipv4_address('255.255.255.255')
True
>>> validate_ipv4_address('10.0.0.1')
True
>>> validate_ipv4_address('01.01.01.01')
False
>>> validate_ipv4_address('123.456.789.0')
False
>>> validate_ipv4_address('0.0.0.0')
True
>>> validate_ipv4_address('-1.0.0.0')
False
>>> validate_ipv4_address('1.1.1.')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in validate_ipv4_address
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in <genexpr>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: ''
>>> validate_ipv4_address('.1.1.1')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in validate_ipv4_address
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in <genexpr>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: ''
>>> validate_ipv4_address('1..1.1')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in validate_ipv4_address
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in <genexpr>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: ''

(bitwise, each octet should be 8 bits or less, but each is prepended with '0b')

>>> bin(0)
'0b0'
>>> len(bin(0))
3
>>> bin(255)
'0b11111111'
>>> len(bin(256))
11
0

I saw very bad regexes in this page.. so i came with my own:

\b((\d|[1-9]\d|1\d\d|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.){3}(\d|[1-9]\d|1\d\d|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\b

Explanation:

num-group = (0-9|10-99|100-199|200-249|250-255)
<border> + { <num-group> + <dot-cahracter> }x3 + <num-group> + <border>

Here you can verify how it works here

0

Valid regex for IPV4 address for Java

^((\\d|[1-9]\\d|[0-1]\\d{2}|2[0-4]\\d|25[0-5])[\\.]){3}(\\d|[1-9]\\d|[0-1]\\d{2}|2[0-4]\\d|25[0-5])$
0

My [extended] approach → regexp for space-separated IP addresses:

((((25[0-5]|(2[0-4]|1[0-9]|[1-9]|)[0-9])(\\.(?=\\d)|(?!\\d))){4})( (?!$)|$))+

Uses PCRE look-ahead.

0

Try this

^(127|10).[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}"

0

This pattern unclude 52 symbols and accept cuncks started with zero.

/^(?:(?:[01]?\d?\d|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])(?:\.|$)){4}\b$/
0

My solution here:

^([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])(\.([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])){3}$

This regex will match:

0.0.0.0
255.255.255.255
123.123.123.123
127.0.0.1
192.168.0.1

But it will NOT match:

192.168.1.01
256.256.256.256
01.01.01.01
0

To validate any IP address in the valid range 0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255 can be written in very simple form as below.

((1?[0-9]?[0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}(1?[0-9]?[0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])
0

Considering some variants suggested, \d and \b may not be supported. Hence, just in case:

IPv4 address

^((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]?|0)\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9][0-9]?|0)$

Test: https://debuggex.com/r/izHiog3KkYztRMSJ

graph

-1

This is regex works for me:
"\<((([1-9]|1[0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}([1-9]|1[0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-4]))\>"

-3
String zeroTo255 = "([0-9]|[0-9][0-9]|(0|1)[0-9][0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])";

it can contain single digit i.e ([0-9]);  
It can contain two digits i.e ([0-9][0-9]); 
range is (099 to 199)i.e((0|1)[0-9][0-9]); 
range is (200 - 249) i.e (2[0-9][0-9]) ; 
range is (250-255) i.e(25[0-5]);
-3

^\\s*[0-9]+\\.[0-9]+\\.[0-9]+\\.[0-9]\\s*

1
  • 3
    This would match 0987654.3.2.1 too.
    – memowe
    Oct 26, 2012 at 9:56
1
2

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.