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I got a disposable class with following constructor:

 public MyClass(bool allowed){
    if(allowed) return;
    else { // leave outer using }
}

And it is used like this

using (new MyClass(false))
{
   DoSomething();
}

Or like following

using (new MyClass(true))
{
   DoSomething();
}

How to achieve that only the one called with (true) will execute the block (aka DoSomething()) and if it is called with (false) it will not execute the block?

  • 1. Pass the boolean value into the DoSomething method. 2. Store it at class level and check inside DoSomething. 3. Wrap the entire using block in an if check. There's a lot of options here, too broad really. This code feels a little smelly. – DavidG Oct 17 '18 at 12:23
  • Why is MyClass disposable in the first place? Why can't you make it not implement IDisposable and just return a boolean, and just use an if statement? – mason Oct 17 '18 at 12:23
  • if (! allowed) throw new Something(); – bommelding Oct 17 '18 at 12:24
  • throw an exception inside the constructor – Adrian Oct 17 '18 at 12:24
  • Even if you can do it, should you? At a casual glance, how do you think the code will read to another dev (or you in about 2 weeks time)? If it's non-obvious, then you shouldn't consider it. – spender Oct 17 '18 at 12:24
0

Why not base on the value boolean

var b = true;// or false
using (new MyClass(b))
{
    if(b)
        DoSomething();
}
  • Because the validation MUST be inside MyClass – Best_Where_Gives Oct 17 '18 at 12:24
  • @Best_Where_Gives: Why? If DoSomething was part of MyClass(which you not even use), then you could add the logic there. – Rango Oct 17 '18 at 12:26
0

Since the previous answer was not sufficient, I would suggest adding a public property to MyClass which can be used to get the boolean value and check against that in the using statement.

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