43

When using Object.keys(obj), the return value is a string[], whereas I want a (keyof obj)[].

const v = {
    a: 1,
    b: 2
}

Object.keys(v).reduce((accumulator, current) => {
    accumulator.push(v[current]);
    return accumulator;
}, []);

I have the error:

Element implicitly has an 'any' type because type '{ a: number; b: number; }' has no index signature.

TypeScript 3.1 with strict: true. Playground: here, please check all checkboxes in Options to activate strict: true.

  • 4
    Don't think you can do better then a type assertion (Object.keys(v) as Array<keyof typeof v>) the definition is what it is – Titian Cernicova-Dragomir Oct 17 '18 at 13:50
49
0

Object.keys returns a string[]. This is by design as described in this issue

This is intentional. Types in TS are open ended. So keysof will likely be less than all properties you would get at runtime.

There are several solution, the simplest one is to just use a type assertion:

const v = {
    a: 1,
    b: 2
};

var values = (Object.keys(v) as Array<keyof typeof v>).reduce((accumulator, current) => {
    accumulator.push(v[current]);
    return accumulator;
}, [] as (typeof v[keyof typeof v])[]);

You can also create an alias for keys in Object that will return the type you want:

export const v = {
    a: 1,
    b: 2
};

declare global {
    interface ObjectConstructor {
        typedKeys<T>(o: T) : Array<keyof T>
    }
}
Object.typedKeys = Object.keys as any

var values = Object.typedKeys(v).reduce((accumulator, current) => {
    accumulator.push(v[current]);
    return accumulator;
}, [] as (typeof v[keyof typeof v])[]);
| improve this answer | |
5
0

You can use the Extract utility type to conform your param to only those keyof typeof obj which are strings (which they are anyways).


    Object.keys(obj).forEach((key: Extract<keyof typeof obj, string>) => {
      const item = obj[key]
    })
| improve this answer | |
4
0

Based on Titian Cernicova-Dragomir answer and comment

Why

One of TypeScript’s core principles is that type checking focuses on the shape that values have. (reference)

Let's see what would happen if by default we would type Object.keys "literally":

interface SimpleObject {
   a: string 
   b: string 
}

const getKeys = (obj:SimpleObject) => Object.keys(obj)

const obj = {
   a: "article", 
   b: "bridge",
   c: "Camel" 
}

const x = getKeys(obj) // valid since obj has the shape of SimpleObject

If we type Object.keys litterally we would get that typeof x is "a"|"b"[], but the actual value of x is ["a", "b", "c"]

Type assertion is exactly for such cases - when the programmer has additional knowledge. In this case, if you know that obj doesn't have properties beyond SimpleObject use type assertion.

Solution

Instead of Object.keys(obj) use (Object.keys(obj) as Array<keyof typeof obj>)


Deprecated Original answer

You can use the following general function wrapper

const getObjectKeys = <O extends object>(obj:O) => Object.keys(obj) as Array<keyof O>
| improve this answer | |
  • Should be selected answer! – tomermes May 29 at 11:35
3
0

See https://github.com/microsoft/TypeScript/issues/20503.

declare const BetterObject: {
  keys<T extends {}>(object: T): (keyof T)[]
}

const icons: IconName[] = BetterObject.keys(IconMap)

Will retain type of keys instead of string[]

| improve this answer | |
2
0

As a possible solution, you can iterate using for..in over your object:

for (const key in myObject) {
  console.log(myObject[key].abc); // works!
}

While this, as you said, would not work:

for (const key of Object.keys(myObject)) {
  console.log(myObject[key].abc); // doesn't!
}
| improve this answer | |

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