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Go to the Grid Spacing Styles section. Create a style rule to apply the Border Box model to the div elements belonging to the following classes: container, row, classes that begin with column, cell, and a elements nested within div elements belonging to the cell class.

I have tried everything I can think of and nothing works. *

closed as off-topic by Paulie_D, Temani Afif, johnny 5, SuperDJ, Quentin Oct 17 '18 at 14:35

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  • Is this homework? – Alexander De Sousa Oct 17 '18 at 13:57
  • Honestly, yes. But I have no idea how to do it and the instructions make NO sense. This is my first time ever doing coding. I'm not asking for you guys to do this for me. I'm asking if y'all can help me... – HappyPumpkin Oct 17 '18 at 13:59
  • I appreciate your honesty although that's not what Stack Overflow is for. Has your teacher shown you any css in class before? – Alexander De Sousa Oct 17 '18 at 14:00
  • 1
    “I have tried everything I can think of and nothing works” - then start by showing us what you tried, and also explain your reasoning behind it. And if you are having trouble with specific parts (like maybe “classes that begin with column”), then do some research on that. – misorude Oct 17 '18 at 14:04
  • We have an online book to read but it doesn't talk about applying border boxes. – HappyPumpkin Oct 17 '18 at 14:04
7

HTML and CSS work together to make the visual web that you see. They are responsible for 2 key parts,

HTML is the structure, much like the bricks, cement of a building. While CSS is the visuals that go on top like the paint colour and pictures on the wall.

Let’s start with a short example this a heading and paragraph

<h2>Heading level 2</h2>
<p>Our first paragraph</p>

This will appear as probably just black text on your computer, we can add some flair with CSS, which are almost like spoken rules, so if we wanted to say “Let’s make every paragraph text colour red“ we could achieve this with:

p {
    color: red;
}

We can dictate many visual features by adding more rules:

p {
    color: red;
    font-weight: bold;
}

Let's say we had multiple paragraphs, we might want to differentiate one of them this is where we can use "classes", you add a class to HTML like so:

<h2>Heading level 2</h2>
<p>Our first paragraph</p>
<p>Our second paragraph</p>
<p class="special">Our third paragraph</p>
<p>Our fourth paragraph</p>

Then in CSS you can pick it up with a similar fashion to before but prefixed with a period.

.special {
    color: blue;
}

At the moment we could add the special class to almost anything and it would make the text blue, but maybe we don't want that such as:

<h2>Heading level 2</h2>
<p>Our first paragraph</p>
<p>Our second paragraph</p>
<h2 class="special">Heading level 2</h2>
<p class="special">Our third paragraph</p>
<p>Our fourth paragraph</p>

We might not want our h2's to be blue as well so we can target only specific HTML elements like so:

p.special {
    color: blue;
}

h2.special {
    color: purple;
}

Now the "special" class acts differently depending on which element it's applied to.

Coming back to your example, we can break this up a little:

  1. Create a style rule to apply the Border Box model
  2. Apply this to the div elements belonging to the following classes: container, row classes
  3. classes that begin with column, cell
  4. a elements nested within div elements belonging to the cell class.

Now we have 4 distinct tasks that we can build up to incrementally.

I think you have already figured out that the border box model is a property, this makes various elements behave in a slightly more sane way. i.e. the intuitive way you'd expect things to work is not what is default hence the need to correct into the border box model.

This property also needs to work across multiple browsers so you can start like so:

* {
  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
  -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

Although here we've applied it to everything using the asterisk. Step 2 is to restrict this down a little bit, so the same way we restricted our special class to specific elements you'll need to do the same here.

Remember you can have multiple rules if you separate them with commas such as:

.class1, .class2 {
  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
  -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

Part 3 is a little more vague but I think it means classes like column-1 or cellular, this brings us to an interesting feature of CSS, you can do some pretty basic regex-like operations in your css like so:

div[class^='startingwith'] {
  color: pink;
}

Which would work for only the first 2 divs. Take note of the ^ character, in many applications this means "starting with", not just CSS.

<div class="startingwith-this">Hello world</div>
<div class="startingwith-this-and-this">Hello world</div>
<div class="not-startingwith-this">Hello world</div>

It's also worth noting that you can omit the word "div" and then this would apply to any element that has a class starting with the specified name.

The final part of your question is trying to show you how you don't just target things directly by calling a class, you can work out context and only apply styling when a particular structure of HTML has been followed, for example:

<div class="intro>
   <p>Main paragraph at the start</p>
</div>
<p>Other lesser paragraphs...</p>
<p>Other lesser paragraphs...</p>

You can target the paragraph that is nested simply be separating rules with spaces:

.intro p { 
  color: crimson;
}

Now only the paragraph that is WITHIN .intro will be styled with crimson, you can apply this logic to do the same for anchor tags .

  • Okay, I've done other coding assignments similar to that before. – HappyPumpkin Oct 17 '18 at 14:16
  • upvote for your effort ;) – iLuvLogix Oct 17 '18 at 14:18
  • I understand how to format sentences but I really need some help with my border box and div elements. Once again, not asking you guys to do it for me. I just need some help. This is my first semester EVER taking web development. – HappyPumpkin Oct 17 '18 at 14:23
  • @HappyPumpkin no problem, I'm just editing more info in now, I won't solve it but I'll get you up to speed. – Alexander De Sousa Oct 17 '18 at 14:24
  • @iLuvLogix thanks buddy. – Alexander De Sousa Oct 17 '18 at 14:35

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