49

When i run this code.

#include <stdio.h>

void moo(int a, int *b);

int main()
{
    int x;
    int *y;

    x = 1;
    y = &x;

    printf("Address of x = %d, value of x = %d\n", &x, x);
    printf("Address of y = &d, value of y = %d, value of *y = %d\n", &y, y, *y);
    moo(9, y);
}

void moo(int a, int *b)
{
    printf("Address of a = %d, value of a = %d\n", &a, a);
    printf("Address of b = %d, value of b = %d, value of *b = %d\n", &b, b, *b);
}

I keep getting this error in my compiler.

/Volumes/MY USB/C Programming/Practice/addresses.c:16: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘int *’
/Volumes/MY USB/C Programming/Practice/addresses.c:17: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘int **’
/Volumes/MY USB/C Programming/Practice/addresses.c:17: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 3 has type ‘int *’
/Volumes/MY USB/C Programming/Practice/addresses.c: In function ‘moo’:
/Volumes/MY USB/C Programming/Practice/addresses.c:23: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘int *’
/Volumes/MY USB/C Programming/Practice/addresses.c:24: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘int **’
/Volumes/MY USB/C Programming/Practice/addresses.c:24: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 3 has type ‘int *’

Could you help me?

Thanks

blargman

  • 2
    Those say "warning", not "error". That means that your program will still run. But do fix the warnings per the answer below. – Jim Balter Mar 13 '11 at 0:13
93

You want to use %p to print a pointer. From the spec:

p The argument shall be a pointer to void. The value of the pointer is converted to a sequence of printing characters, in an implementation-defined manner.

And don't forget the cast, e.g.

printf("%p\n",(void*)&a);
  • that's what i originally thought but the tutorial on this website (cis.temple.edu/~ingargio/cis71/code/addresses.c) is telling me to use %d... is it wrong. – nambvarun Mar 12 '11 at 23:58
  • 2
    @blargman, yes, it's wrong. You might be able to coerce things into working by typecasting, but since %d is for printing signed integers, it's probably not a good choice. – Carl Norum Mar 13 '11 at 0:00
  • 8
    +1: ... but for portability (and to follow the SHALL from the Standard) don't forget to cast the address. printf("%p\n",(void*)&a); – pmg Mar 13 '11 at 0:07
  • 3
    @pmg, is the cast necessary? I thought conversions to and from void * are safe and automatic in C (6.3.2.2 paragraph 1). – Carl Norum Mar 13 '11 at 0:12
  • 6
    @Carl: in variadic functions the compiler cannot check the types of arguments against the expected types. The cast to void* is not automatic: what is automatic in variadic functions is a few low-range integers to int, and float to double. – pmg Mar 13 '11 at 0:24
8

When you intend to print the memory address of any variable or a pointer, using %d won't do the job and will cause some compilation errors, because you're trying to print out a number instead of an address, and even if it does work, you'd have an intent error, because a memory address is not a number. the value 0xbfc0d878 is surely not a number, but an address.

What you should use is %p. e.g.,

#include<stdio.h>

int main(void) {

    int a;
    a = 5;
    printf("The memory address of a is: %p\n", (void*) &a);
    return 0;
}

Good luck!

  • 3
    The value 0xbfc0d878 is a number. (void*)0xbfc0d878 is not. And %p is likely to use a human-readable representation that looks like a number (typically hex) but that doesn't mean pointers are numbers. (BTW, the question was answered more than 2 years ago.) – Keith Thompson Jun 13 '13 at 6:38
  • Why do we have to cast to (void*)? – Cristian Gutu Feb 1 '19 at 16:23
1

To print the address of a variable, you need to use the %p format. %d is for signed integers. For example:

#include<stdio.h>

void main(void)
{
  int a;

  printf("Address is %p:",&a);
}
  • 2
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Alexander Mar 20 '18 at 3:15
1

I tried in online compiler https://www.onlinegdb.com/online_c++_compiler

int main()
{
    cout<<"Hello World";
    int x = 10;
    int *p = &x;
    printf("\nAddress of x is %p\n", &x); // 0x7ffc7df0ea54
    printf("Address of p is %p\n", p);    // 0x7ffc7df0ea54

    return 0;
}
0

Looks like you use %p: Print Pointers

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