I have a class like this:

class C {
private:
    std::unordered_map<char, int> m = {{'a', 1}, {'b', 2}, {'c', 3}};

public:
    int operator[](const char& key) const {
        return m.find(key)->second;
    }
};

Is it possible to iterate the elements of the map without modifying the class?

I want to have something like:

for (auto x: c) {
    // x -> a map element
}

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ c++ Oct 18 at 12:02

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  • 3
    You have to provide begin(c) and end(c). Seems hard without modifying the class. – Jarod42 Oct 18 at 9:10
  • Almost, but no. There is no way to retrieve the iterators of m, nor a list of its keys, so you can't implement the begin/end pair. – Quentin Oct 18 at 9:10
  • Looks like I need to either modify the class, or somehow find the keys, right? – Keloo Oct 18 at 9:11
up vote 12 down vote accepted

No, a ranged-for loop does not use operator[]

The definition of

for ( range_declaration : range_expression ) loop_statement

Is that it is treated as-if it were (without introducing __names)

{
    auto && __range = range_expression ; 
    auto __begin = begin_expr ;
    auto __end = end_expr ;
    for ( ; __begin != __end; ++__begin) {   
        range_declaration = *__begin; 
        loop_statement    
    } 
} 

With the following rules for begin_expr and end_expr:

  • If range_expression is an expression of array type, then begin_expr is __range and end_expr is (__range + __bound), where __bound is the number of elements in the array (if the array has unknown size or is of an incomplete type, the program is ill-formed)
  • If range_expression is an expression of a class type C that has both a member named begin and a member named end (regardless of the type or accessibility of such member), then begin_expr is __range.begin() and end_expr is __range.end();
  • Otherwise, begin_expr is begin(__range) and end_expr is end(__range), which are found via argument-dependent lookup (non-ADL lookup is not performed).

A simple change to your class which would suffice would to be add begin and end, delegating to m.begin() and m.end()

class C {
private:
    std::unordered_map<char, int> m = {{'a', 1}, {'b', 2}, {'c', 3}};

public:
    int operator[](const char& key) const {
        return m.find(key)->second; 
        // return m.at(key); or return m[key]; are both safer than this
    }
    std::unordered_map<char, int>::iterator begin() {
        return m.begin();
    }
    // overloaded on the constness of "this"
    std::unordered_map<char, int>::const_iterator begin() const {
        return m.begin();
    }
    std::unordered_map<char, int>::iterator end() {
        return m.end();
    }   
    // overloaded on the constness of "this"
    std::unordered_map<char, int>::const_iterator end() const {
        return m.end();
    }   
};
  • const version with const_iterator might be good too. – Jarod42 Oct 18 at 9:21
  • And depending on how the class is used, it might make sense to only provide const iterators in order to encapsulate changes to the map. – eerorika Oct 18 at 9:22
  • Adding noexcept might be better. – liliscent Oct 18 at 9:25
  • cbegin/cend? – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 18 at 9:34
  • 3
    @Caleth But you don't design an interface just for one language construct – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 18 at 9:37

No.

In addition to the constraints imposed specifically by ranged-for, which others have covered, your class does not expose any way to know which elements are in the map, not even the first or last element keys. It does not expose any iterators. It simply does not expose sufficient information to perform iteration.

A class can be iterated if it provides iterators i.e. if begin(c) and end(c) return iterators (or c.begin() and c.end()). Your class doesn't provide iterators, and it won't be possible to implement the iterators outside of the class, since the internal map is private.

So, the answer is no, the class does need to be modified.

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