1

Currently I'm attending a course on Udemy about React.

The lection right now is about passing method references. So basically the instructor passes method references as props in the Person tag inside the render method of App.js. And in the Person component the switchNameHandler gets executed when the button gets clicked and the nameChangedHandler gets executed when the input textfield gets modified.

So the course instructor makes use of the .bind() method. I already researched what the bind() method does. But in the current example I have two questions:

  1. To what do the two this keywords refer to in this current example(second Person tag in App.js => value of click)? As far as I understand the code he takes the current method of the class with this.switchNameHandler and binds it to the current class again(Doesn't make sense I know)? The two handler methods are part of the class and it doesn't make sense to me, because you normally bind an anonymous function which is outside the class to an object.

  2. Why does the instructor (in the second Person tag) make us of the bind method in the switchNameHandler, but not in the nameChangedHandler?


App.js

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import './App.css';
import Person from './Person/Person'

class App extends Component {

  state = {
    persons: [
      { name: 'Peter', age: 20 },
      { name: 'Manu', age: 28 },
      { name: 'Stephanie', age: 24 }
    ],
    otherState: 'some other value'
  }

  switchNameHandler = (newName) => {
    //console.log('Was clicked!');
    this.setState({
      persons: [
        { name: newName, age: 20 },
        { name: 'Manu', age: 5 },
        { name: 'Stephanie', age: 30 }
      ]
    })
  }

  nameChangedHandler = (event) => {
    this.setState({
      persons: [
        { name: 'Max', age: 20 },
        { name: event.target.value, age: 5 },
        { name: 'Stephanie', age: 30 }
      ]
    })
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div className="App">
        <h1>Hi, I'm a React App</h1>
        <button onClick={() => this.switchNameHandler('Maximilian!!!!!')}>Switch Name</button>
        <Person
          name={this.state.persons[0].name}
          age={this.state.persons[0].age}></Person>
        <Person
          name={this.state.persons[1].name}
          age={this.state.persons[1].age}
          click={this.switchNameHandler.bind(this, 'Max!')}
          changed={this.nameChangedHandler}>My hobbies: Racing</Person>
        <Person
          name={this.state.persons[2].name}
          age={this.state.persons[2].age}></Person>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

export default App;


Person.js

import React from 'react';
import './Person.css';

const person = (props) => {
    return (
        <div className="Person">
            <p onClick={props.click}>I'm { props.name } and I am { props.age } years old!</p>
            <p>{props.children}</p>
            <input type="text" onChange={props.changed} value={props.name} />
        </div>

    )
};

export default person;

Little addition with react docs: I'm reading the react docs right now (https://reactjs.org/docs/faq-functions.html) and there is this one line:

If you need to have access to the parent component in the handler, you also need to bind the function to the component instance (see below).

Bind in Render:(code from react site)

class Foo extends Component {
  handleClick() {
    console.log('Click happened');
  }
  render() {
    return <button onClick={this.handleClick.bind(this)}>Click Me</button>;
  }
}

In our case the handler method is not in the parent component but in the same component. I must understand something wrong in this case too.

1

If you do not bind the function and just pass as parameter like:

<Person
  name={this.state.persons[1].name}
  age={this.state.persons[1].age}
  click={this.switchNameHandler}
  changed={this.nameChangedHandler}>My hobbies: Racing</Person>

And you would have defined the function as above. When you try to access to the App instance you will get an undefined:

switchNameHandler(newName){
    console.log(this);// undefined
}

But in your case switchNameHandler is an arrow function. According to MDN arrow function documentation

Until arrow functions, every new function defined its own this value (based on how function was called, a new object in the case of a constructor, undefined in strict mode function calls, the base object if the function is called as an "object method", etc.)

But even knowing this, why to bind the function? because :

  1. You need to keep the context (App's this)
  2. Pass an additional parameter ('Max!')

To answer the second question: nameChangedHandler does not need to bind because an arrow function and it takes the context where it is created.

  • Does the this in {this.switchNameHandler} refer to the Person tag because it's inside it? If not, what does the this in {this.switchNameHandler} refer to? And do I understand correctly, that the arrow function automatically sets the this context to the App, because it's inside the class? – Ird Oct 18 '18 at 13:22
  • 1
    @TNII {this.switchNameHandler} refers to the App this. The function is just a prop (parameter) that Person receives – SergioEscudero Oct 18 '18 at 13:25
  • @TNII your last edit is correct – SergioEscudero Oct 18 '18 at 13:26
  • 1
    Right. This method is bind again because the bind creates a new function that, when called, has its this keyword set to the provided value and also set the parameters. If you do something like this.switchNameHandler('Max!'), it is not going to work because the engine is going to execute the function and the result is assigned to click props. – SergioEscudero Oct 18 '18 at 13:43
  • 1
    Another option to to that is creating a new arrow funtion and providing the parameter like: {() => this.switchNameHandler('Max!')} – SergioEscudero Oct 18 '18 at 13:45
0

First case (click={this.switchNameHandler.bind(this, 'Max!')}) is just so you don't need to declare an extra function to pass the argument to function. In the end, the final result is the same as the example above (onClick={() => this.switchNameHandler('Maximilian!!!!!')}), with the difference that in first case, it creates an arrow function (which automatically binds this) to call a method with a custom param and the the second binds the parameter together with this (creating a new function object).

The second case (changed={this.nameChangedHandler}), since this is automatically bound to arrow functions (and this function is declared as an arrow function), you don't need to bind it again when passing as prop.

0

There are two kinds of function:

  1. function you declare with the function keyword

This kind of function has a variable called this represent the context of the calling object and can be passed implicitly or explicitly.

const obj = {
   test: function() {
          console.log(this)
         }
}

obj.test();
test();
const bindedTest = obj.test.bind(obj);
bindedTest();

In the previous example we called the test function with the context of obj, so this represent or equal the obj(print the obj). If you called the function without context the compiler will search for the function in the window object context (javascript global object in browser environment). the last calling first you bind the this keword to the obj context then you can use anywhere without losing that binding.

function test () {
   console.log(this)
}

test();

In the second example you call the function test with out context explicitly defining context then the function get called with window object context.

  1. arrow function

arrow function does not have a this. If you use a this in arrow function it can not find a variable called this in its context so it search for this in the upper context and so on until it find a value for it.

const obj = {
     test: () => {
         console.log(this)
         }
}

obj.test();

In the previous exampled i called the test function with the context of obj. but arrow function does not have a this so it search for the context in the upper scope which is the global object(window).

  • Now In react all the method must have a this context refer to the class they are in.
  • If you use arrow function then you do not need to bind the this when you call it, the function will search for the this in the upper scope which is the class context.
  • If you use function declaration then you have to bind the this because the function will be called with window context which will be reference error so we bind the this to the class context.

In your case you did not have to bind the this anywhere you could use it directly because you use arrow function.

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