Suppose the following minimal code:

#include <stdio.h>
char character = 'c';
int main (void)
{
    char character = 'b';
    printf("The current value of head is %c", character);
}

I overwrote character within main,
Then what happened to c? Will it be destroyed automatically or live in the memory perpetually?

This comment clicks with me: "variables in C are nothing but named chunks of memory".

  • 2
    This is not directly relevant to your question, but I think one thing is worth pointing out. Besides cleaning up call frames, C doesn't do any memory management for you. Even if you've overwritten a global variable, its former value is not "destroyed automatically" (as an object with no references left), but is literally overwritten in-place, because variables in C are nothing but named chunks of memory. – Eli Korvigo Oct 18 at 13:40
  • So dummy am I, that is what I am willing to ask, it will overwritten in place if declared as global. @EliKorvigo – avirate Oct 18 at 13:43
  • 8
    To clarify, are you aware of the difference between writing char character = 'b'; (shadowing) and character = 'b'; (reassigning) ? – Boann Oct 18 at 15:18
  • good point, I am bewared after reading the comment, reassigning is to overwrite it in place @Boann, I think I understand it thoroughly with your explicit pointing the distinction of concepts reassign and shadow – avirate Oct 18 at 15:28
  • 1
    C values don't have lives. – immibis Oct 19 at 3:10
up vote 25 down vote accepted

"shadowing" the global character variable hides the variable from the main function, but it will still be a part of the program.

If character variable was declared as static, then the compiler might warn that character variable is never used and character will be optimized away.

However, character variable is not declared as static; the compiler will assume that character variable might be accessed externally and keep character variable in the memory.

EDIT:

As noted by @Deduplicator, linker optimizations and settings could omit the variable from the final executable, if permitted. However, this is an edge case that won't happen "automatically".

  • Whole Program Optimization might allow eliding the global. – Deduplicator Oct 18 at 20:12
  • @Deduplicator - true. I updated the answer to reflect your comment. However, this is far from the "automatic" behavior asked about. Linkers assume that dynamic extensions might use such variables. For example, a variable version might be never accessed by a program but used by it's extensions. – Myst Oct 18 at 20:42

You have two separate variables named character: one at file scope set to 'c', whose lifetime is the lifetime of the program, and one in main set to 'b', whose lifetime is that of its scope.

The definition of character in main masks the definition at file scope, so only the latter is accessible.

  • How about if declared as static char character = 'b – avirate Oct 18 at 13:35
  • 1
    @riderdragon For the variable in main, the static modifier gives it a lifetime of the whole program. – dbush Oct 18 at 13:36
  • 1
    @riderdragon, the static declaration behaves differently, as mentioned in my answer, but it will not effect the lifetime, just the question "will the compiler optimize the variable away?". – Myst Oct 18 at 13:36

Complement to the other answers:

Try this and you'll understand:

#include <stdio.h>

char character = 'c';

void Check()
{
  printf("Check: c = %c\n", character);
}

int main(void)
{
  char character = 'b';
  printf("The current value of head is %c\n", character);
  Check();
}

It will live on (till the program dies, as any static-storage variable would) and you can still get to it:

#include <stdio.h>
char character = 'c';
int main (void)
{
    char character = 'b';
    printf("The current value of head is '%c'\n", character);
    {
        extern char character;
        //in this scope, overrides the local `character` with 
        //the global (extern?) one
        printf("The current value of head is '%c'\n", character);
    }
    printf("The current value of head is '%c'\n", character);
}
/*prints:
The current value of head is 'b'
The current value of head is 'c'
The current value of head is 'b'
*/

The local extern declaration doesn't work reliably/portably for static globals, though you can still get to them through pointers or through a separate function.


( Why isn't static char character='c'; int main(){ char character='b'; { extern char character; } } reliable with the global being static?

6.2.2p4 seems like it wants to make it work for statics too, but the wording is ambiguous (a prior declaration has no linkage and another has static/extern linkage so what now?).

6.2.2p4:

For an identifier declared with the storage-class specifier extern in a scope in which a prior declaration of that identifier is visible,31) if the prior declaration specifies internal or external linkage, the linkage of the identifier at the later declaration is the same as the linkage specified at the prior declaration. If no prior declaration is visible, or if the prior declaration specifies no linkage, then the identifier has external linkage.

My clang 6.0.0 is accepting it with a static char character='b'; but my gcc 7.3.0 isn't.

Thanks to Eric Postpischil for pointing out the ambiguous possibility of this being usable with static too. )

  • @EricPostpischil Thanks for the comment. I didn't know about 6.2.2 4. It seems like the intention of it was that it should work for statics too, though it could've have been worded clearer (unambiguously). (Anyway, I've removed the "doesn't work for statics" paragraph.) – PSkocik Oct 18 at 13:54
  • @EricPostpischil Readded it with more info. My clang is accepting it with static too, but my gcc is rejecting it with an error. – PSkocik Oct 18 at 14:07
  • @Eric, 29 years... – prl Oct 19 at 2:53
  • @prl: Oh, I had forgotten about the 1989 version. Are we sure that is not just a myth from the pre-Internet era? – Eric Postpischil Oct 19 at 11:37
  • 1
    Per this question, the earlier draft of this answer was correct: One cannot expect to regain access to an identifier declared with static. Attempting to do so has undefined behavior (see the question and answer), so Clang’s behavior does not violate the C standard, but it cannot be relied on by a strictly conforming program, and GCC’s behavior is also not a violation and may be preferred. – Eric Postpischil Oct 19 at 11:40

After the declaration of character in main, any reference to character in that function refers to that one, not the one at global scope. We call this shadowing.

As for the effect on memory, you can't say due to the as-if rule adopted by the language: a compiler might optimise to

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
     printf("The current value of head is b");
}

for example.

#include <stdio.h>
char character = 'c';
int main (void)
{
    char character = 'b';
    printf("The current value of head is %c\n", character);
    printc();
}

void printc()
{
    printf("%c", character);
}

It makes it all clear. It is not destroyed it is just shadowed.

Output: The current value of head is b
c

Normaly, the global variable will stay. Since your local variable only shadows the name, it doesn't affect the storage.

But it could also depend on linker settings. Linker could optimize the unsused global variable out.

Although global variables exist from the start to the end of the execution of a program, they are not automatically accessible.

A global variable is accessible starting from the location in the file where the global variable is defined or declared until the end of the file.

If in a function scope one defines a variable with the same name, the global variable will exist, but will not be accessible.

  • “Accessible” is not a good word to use for this. The C standard defines the issues here in terms of scope (and visibility) and linkage. “Access,” as defined in the standard, is reading or modifying an object, and the objects in question here are theoretically accessible, as there are ways to access an object without using its identifier. (For that matter, “global” and “variable” are imprecise. In the terms of the standard, an identifier has file scope, rather than global. And the scope applies to the identifier used to name the object, rather than variable.) – Eric Postpischil Oct 18 at 13:51

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