10

I am interested in the scenario where we have some function f which is recursive and which we are not provided the source code to.

I would like a function memoizer: Function -> Function which takes in say f and returns a function g such that g = f (in the sense they return the same value given the same arguments) which when called first checks if the called arguments are in its 'cache' (memory of results it has calculated before) and if so returns the result from this, otherwise it should compute f, should f call itself with some arguments, this is tantamount to calling g with those arguments and I would like that f first check if the cache of g contains those arguments and if so return the result from this, otherwise ...

This is easy (in Javascript) to do given the source code of f, I simply define memoize in the obvious way and do something like

let f = memoize((...args) => {/* source code of f */});

But this doesn't appeal to me at all (mainly because I might want a memoized and non memoized version of the same function and then I'd have to write the same function twice) and won't work if I don't know how to implement f.

In case it's not clear what I'm asking,

I would like a function memoize which takes a function such as

fact = n => n === 0 ? 1 : n * fact(n - 1);

And returns some new function g such that fact(n) = g(n) for all n and which for example when g(10) is computed stores the values of fact(0), ..., fact(10) which are computed while computing g(10) and then if I ask for say g(7) it finds the result in the cache and returns it to me.

I've thought that conceptually it's possible to detect when f is called since I have it's address and maybe I could replace all calls to f with a new function where I compute f and store the result and then pass the value on to where it would normally go. But I don't know how to do this (and it sounds unpleasant).

1

4 Answers 4

6

I might want a memoized and non memoized version of the same function and then I'd have to write the same function twice

Yes, you need to. The recursive call to fact(n - 1) inside the function can only refer to one fact function - either a memoized or an unmemoized one.

So what you need to do to avoid code duplication is define fact with the Y combinator:

const makeFact = rec => n => n === 0 ? 1 : n * rec(n - 1);
//               ^^^                           ^^^

const factA = Y(makeFact);
const factB = memoizingY(makeFact);

function Y(make) {
    const f = make((...args) => f(...args)); // const f = make(f) is easier to understand
    return f;                                // but doesn't work with eager evaluation
}

I'll leave the definition of memoizingY as an exercise to the reader :-)


Possibly simpler approach:

const makeFact = annotate => {
    const f = annotate(n => n === 0 ? 1 : n * f(n - 1));
    return f;
}

const factA = makeFact(identity);
const factB = makeFact(memoize);
4
  • Very clever. This is cool thank you, this Y combinator thing is extremely cute. This resolves the issue of duplication for sure (which was secretly my main concern). This is a good lesson in writing suitably high level functions I feel. Commented Oct 18, 2018 at 20:22
  • @rici You can use a memoized f - that's exactly what memoizingY should do. We need the Y combinator functionality here so that makeFact can create multiple fact functions that use different functions for their recursive calls.
    – Bergi
    Commented Oct 18, 2018 at 21:08
  • Can this be used to memoize a given function that was not programmed as you suggest in makeFact, such as the example the OP provided or fib in my answer? Commented Oct 19, 2018 at 22:24
  • @גלעדברקן No, to optimise the recursive calls in an arbitrary function you must overwrite the original variable with the memoised function. If that's not possible, the recursive calls cannot be affected.
    – Bergi
    Commented Oct 20, 2018 at 9:49
5

maybe I could replace all calls to f with a new function where I compute f and store the result and then pass the value on to where it would normally go.

This is actually very easy to do, as Bergi referred to in a comment.

// https://stackoverflow.com/questions/24488862/implementing-automatic-memoization-returns-a-closured-function-in-javascript/ 
function memoize(func) {
  var memo = {};
  var slice = Array.prototype.slice;

  return function() {
    var args = slice.call(arguments);

    if (args in memo)
      return memo[args];
    else
      return (memo[args] = func.apply(this, args));

  }
}

function fib(n) {
  if (n <= 1) return 1;
  return fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2);
}

fib = memoize(fib);

console.log(fib(100));

5
  • @EbenduToit could you please give an example? I'm not sure I follow. Commented Jul 14, 2019 at 18:09
  • Deleted my previous comment, as this is a better idea: If arguments is an object, it is a good idea to hash args first, so the hash of the args is stored as the key for the memory hash map. Commented Jul 17, 2019 at 6:48
  • @EbenduToit ah, good idea. (The code is not meant to be a complete solution, though. More of a general idea.) Commented Jul 17, 2019 at 11:52
  • 1
    Anyone knows why this works only with fib = memoize(fib), and not, for example, with fib2 = memoize(fib) ?
    – spano
    Commented Jan 17, 2022 at 11:39
  • 2
    @spano I suspect that it's because recursive functions call themselves by name. Commented Jan 17, 2022 at 14:22
1

In my limited experience, we do have access to JavaScript source code. We could thus attempt to generate new source code for the memoized function.

// Redefine Function.prototype.bind
// to provide access to bound objects. 
// https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7616461/generate-a-hash-from-string-in-javascript
var _bind = Function.prototype.apply.bind(Function.prototype.bind);
Object.defineProperty(Function.prototype, 'bind', {
    value: function(obj) {
        var boundFunction = _bind(this, arguments);
        boundFunction.boundObject = obj;
        return boundFunction;
    }
});

// Assumes the parameters for the function,
// f, can be consistently mapped.
function memo(f){
  if (!(f instanceof Function))
    throw TypeError('Argument is not an instance of Function.');
    
  // Generate random variable names
  // to avoid conflicts with unknown
  // source code
  function randomKey(numBytes=8){        
      let ranges = [[48, 10], [65, 26], [97, 26]]; 
      let key = '_';

      for (let i=0; i<numBytes; i++){     
          let idx = Math.floor(Math.random() * ranges.length);
          key += String.fromCharCode(ranges[idx][0] + Math.random() * ranges[idx][1]);
      }   

      return key;
  }

  let fName = f.name;
  let boundObject;
  let fCode;
  
  const nativeCodeStr = '(){[nativecode]}';
  
  // Possible Proxy
  try {
    fCode = f.toString();

  } catch(error){
    if (error.constructor == TypeError){
      if (Function(`return ${ fName }.toString()`)() != nativeCodeStr){
        throw TypeError(`Possible Proxy detected: function has a name but no accessible source code. Consider memoizing the target function, ${ fName }.`);
      
      } else {
        throw TypeError(`Function has a name but no accessible source code. Applying toString() to its name, ${ fName }, returns '[native code]'.`);
      }
    
    } else {
      throw Error('Unexpected error calling toString on the argument.');
    }
  }

  if (!fName){
    throw Error('Function name is falsy.');

  // Bound functions
  // Assumes we've monkey-patched
  // Function.prototype.bind previously
  } else if (fCode.replace(/^[^(]+|\s+/g, '') == nativeCodeStr){
    if (/^bound /.test(fName)){
      fName = fName.substr(6);
      boundObject = f.boundObject;
      // Bound functions return '[native code]' for
      // their toString method call so get the code
      // from the original function.
      fCode = Function(`return ${ fName }.toString()`)();
    
    } else {
      throw Error("Cannot access source code, '[native code]' provided.");
    }
  }

  const fNameRegex = new RegExp('(\\W)' + fName + '(\\W)', 'g');
  const cacheName = randomKey();
  const recursionName = randomKey();
  const keyName = randomKey();

  fCode = fCode.replace(/[^\(]+/,'')
    .replace(fNameRegex, '$1' + recursionName + '$2')
    .replace(/return/g, `return ${ cacheName }[${ keyName }] =`)
    .replace(/{/, `{\n  const ${ keyName } = Array.from(arguments);\n\n  if (${ cacheName }[${ keyName }])\n    return ${ cacheName }[${ keyName }];\n`);
  
  const code = `function(){\nconst ${ cacheName } = {};\n\nfunction ${ recursionName + fCode }\n\nreturn ${ recursionName }.apply(${ recursionName }, arguments);}`;

  let g = Function('"use strict";return ' + code)();

  if (boundObject){
    let h = (g).bind(boundObject);
    h.toString = () => code;
    return h;

  } else {
    return g;
  }
} // End memo function


function fib(n) {
  if (n <= 1) return 1;
  return fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2);
}

const h = fib.bind({a: 37});
const g = memo(h);
   
console.log(`g(100): ${ g(100) }`);
console.log(`g.boundObject:`, g.boundObject);
console.log(`g.toString():`, g.toString());

try{ 
  memo(function(){});

} catch(e){
  console.log('Caught error memoizing anonymous function.', e)
}

const p = new Proxy(fib, {
  apply: function(target, that, args){
    console.log('Proxied fib called.');
    return target.apply(target, args);
  }
});

console.log('Calling proxied fib.');
console.log(`p(2):`, p(2));

let memoP;

try {
  memoP = memo(p);
  
} catch (e){
  console.log('Caught error memoizing proxied function.', e)
}

10
  • Nice, I definitely like this, it's resolvable but at present there will be some issue if say the body of f has a variable called g, cache or key but other than that it looks like it works to me provided String(f) provides you the code you want. For a reasonable (? in my head, I'm not a JS programmer) instance where String(f) does not provide what you want, if I bind a function to some object (e.g. h = fib.bind({}) then all I get back is "function () { [native code] }" Commented Oct 19, 2018 at 8:49
  • @Countingstuff good point about bind. Let me see about that. Regarding variable name conflicts, since we're generating code as a string, it would be easy to just assign a random enough string for each of those three variables. Commented Oct 19, 2018 at 9:44
  • @Countingstuff for bound functions, we can extract the original function name (and thus get that source code if it was not native) from the result of [bound_function].name. Commented Oct 19, 2018 at 10:37
  • @Countingstuff and if we wanted to get the bound object to fully recreate the bound, now cached, function, there's at least one method described here that could pave the way: stackoverflow.com/a/14309359/2034787 Commented Oct 19, 2018 at 10:43
  • @Countingstuff now let me see about functions created by Proxy, although I think we've covered the most common use cases. This is pretty cool. I might implement it for a utilisation library. Commented Oct 19, 2018 at 10:45
0

For the main concern inner recursive call is not going to original function causing the memoize is not working as intended. If we can make original function to take additional argument as same function reference, it will simplify.

// adding "fib" as additional argument
function fib(n, fib) {
  if (n < 2) {
    return n;
  }
  return fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2);
}

function memoize(fn, argIndex = 0) {
  const track = {};
  return function memFn(...args) {
    if (args[argIndex] in track) {
      console.log("cached value - ", args[argIndex]);
      return track[args[argIndex]];
    }
    console.log("actual call - ", args[argIndex]);
    return (track[args[argIndex]] = fn.call(this, ...args, memFn));
  };
}

const memFib = memoize(fib);

memFib(6);

For the scenario's where we dont have access to original function (fib in this case), We can use Function constructor to have wrapper function to original function to have additional argument.

function memoize(fn, argIndex = 0) {
  const track = {};
  const wrapFn = new Function(
    "return " + fn.toString().replace(")", `,${fn.name})`),
  )();
  return function memFn(...args) {
    if (args[argIndex] in track) {
      console.log("cached value - ", args[argIndex]);
      return track[args[argIndex]];
    }
    console.log("actual call - ", args[argIndex]);
    return (track[args[argIndex]] = wrapFn.call(this, ...args, memFn));
  };
}

function fib(n) {
  if (n < 2) {
    return n;
  }
  return fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2);
}

const memFib = memoize(fib);

const result = memFib(6)

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