31

I'm trying to create an SQL query that will order the results by a version number (e.g. 1.1, 4.5.10, etc.)

Here's what I tried:

SELECT * FROM Requirements 
    WHERE Requirements.Release NOT LIKE '%Obsolete%' 
    ORDER BY Requirements.ReqNum

Now, the ReqNum field is a string field and unfortunately I can't change it to a float or something like that because I have requirement numbers like 162.1.11.

When I get the results back, I'll get ordering like this:

1.1
1.10
1.11
1.3

How can I write a query that will sort by lexicographic order?

... or,

How can I correctly sort the data?

Thanks for the input in advance!

4
  • Is there a maximum number of levels to the version number? Feb 9, 2009 at 16:26
  • I think the highest I've seen is four levels (1.22.3.4 for example)
    – user38735
    Feb 9, 2009 at 16:33
  • but your current sort order should sort in lexicographic order already? can you give an example where the sort is incorrect?
    – Learning
    Feb 9, 2009 at 16:47
  • 2
    If on SQL Server 2008+ HierarchyId can be used for this Sep 28, 2012 at 19:06

23 Answers 23

36

In PostgreSQL you can do:

SELECT * FROM Requirements
ORDER BY string_to_array(version, '.')::int[];

This last ::int[] makes it convert string values into integers and then compare as such.

4
  • 2
    This is surely the easiest and most efficient of all the answers here?
    – donnek
    Apr 21, 2016 at 11:48
  • @donnek Agreed. Apr 13, 2017 at 4:55
  • What I happened if I remove "::int[]" ? ORDER BY string_to_array(version, '.')::int[]; I have some product versions like: 3.3.0-beta This is a valid SEMVER version. Jul 21, 2021 at 2:28
  • Unfortunately this doesn't work well in some cases. For example, using this formula, version "2.4.0+9" comes first than "2.4.0+10". That's assuming you remove the "::int[]", or it won't work. Jul 21, 2021 at 2:35
28

For best results, refactor version number storage so that each section has it's own column: MajorVersion, MinorVersion, Revision, Build. Then the ordering problem suddenly becomes trivial. You can also build a computed column for easy retrieval of the full string.

7
  • It's not a bad idea, and definitely one that I've come across - problem is that I'd have to manually do this for about 600 columns.
    – user38735
    Feb 9, 2009 at 16:27
  • 1
    columns? You mean tables? You should be able to script it. Feb 9, 2009 at 16:28
  • Beat me to it. And no, you wouldn't have to do it manually. You could use an UPDATE statement to populate them all.
    – recursive
    Feb 9, 2009 at 16:29
  • Hmmm, I kind of like the UPDATE idea - I'll keep this open a bit longer to see if any other inventive ideas come along. Thank you folks!
    – user38735
    Feb 9, 2009 at 16:32
  • Also, if it takes time to change existing code that wants to insert strings in the old way, consider adding a trigger to populate the new fields until everything's in sync. Feb 9, 2009 at 20:03
18
SELECT * FROM Requirements 
WHERE Requirements.Release NOT LIKE '%Obsolete%' 
ORDER BY cast('/' + replace(Requirements.ReqNum , '.', '/') + '/' as hierarchyid);
2
  • 6
    please explain your code, its more efficient to explain code, rather than posting it.
    – Mark
    Nov 13, 2012 at 7:40
  • Good, But its not required to replace '.' to '/', just delete the replace(Requirements.ReqNum , '.', '/') part, so this is enough: ORDER BY cast('/' + Requirements.ReqNum + '/' as HIERARCHYID) Dec 24, 2018 at 7:19
11

A slight variation on @vuttipong-l answer (T-SQL)

SELECT VersionNumber
FROM (
SELECT '6.1.3' VersionNumber UNION
SELECT '6.11.3' UNION
SELECT '6.2.3' UNION
SELECT '6.1.12' 
) AS q
ORDER BY cast('/' + VersionNumber + '/' as hierarchyid)

Works in SQL Server starting with 2008, dots are OK in a string representation of a hierarchyid column, so we don't need to replace them with slashes. A quote from the doc:

Comparison is performed by comparing the integer sequences separated by dots in dictionary order.

There's one caveat though: the version segments must not be prefixed with zeroes.

1
  • I thought "V" here might mean "View", but it's really just a one-character column name that means "Version".
    – Noumenon
    May 9, 2018 at 2:18
8

If you are in SQL Server land...

DECLARE @string varchar(40)
SET @string = '1.2.3.4'
SELECT PARSENAME(@string, 1), PARSENAME(@string, 2), PARSENAME(@string, 3), PARSENAME(@string, 4)

Results: 4, 3, 2, 1

Useful for parsing IP Addresses and other dotted items, such as a version number. (You can use REPLACE() to convert items into dotted notation too... e.g. 1-2-3-4 -> 1.2.3.4)

3
  • 2
    I know this is several years old but it's the most useful hack I've come across this month. Thanks!
    – Rich
    May 10, 2013 at 15:41
  • PARSENAME has a limit that works up to only 4 sub sections. Dec 24, 2018 at 7:26
  • SELECT PARSENAME('1.2.3', 1), PARSENAME('1.2.3.4', 1) == 3, 4 not suitable for my needs.
    – JJS
    Feb 4 at 18:38
4

If you don't re-design the table as Joel Coehoorn sensibly suggests, then you need to re-format the version numbers to a string that sorts as you require, e.g.

  • 1.1 -> 0001.0001.0000
  • 162.1.11 -> 0162.0001.0011

This could be done by a function, or using a computed/virtual column if your DBMS has these. Then you can use that function or column in the ORDER BY clause.

4

The following function will take a version number and format each level out to 3 digits:

Usage:

select * from TableX order by dbo.fn_VersionPad(VersionCol1)

Function:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_VersionPad]
(
    @version varchar(20)
)
RETURNS varchar(20)
AS
BEGIN
    /*
        Purpose:  Pads multi-level Version Number sections to 3 digits
        Example:  1.2.3.4
        Returns:  001.002.003.004
    */

    declare @verPad varchar(20)
    declare @i int
    declare @digits int

    set @verPad = ''

    set @i = len(@version)
    set @digits = 0

    while @i > 0
    begin
        if (substring(@version, @i, 1) = '.')
        begin
            while (@digits < 3)
            begin
                -- Pad version level to 3 digits
                set @verPad = '0' + @verPad
                set @digits = @digits + 1
            end

            set @digits = -1
        end

        set @verPad = substring(@version, @i, 1) + @verPad

        set @i = @i - 1
        set @digits = @digits + 1
    end

    while (@digits < 3)
    begin
        -- Pad version level to 3 digits
        set @verPad = '0' + @verPad
        set @digits = @digits + 1
    end

    return @verPad
END
1
  • This solution helped me with formating a version string into comparable string. Extend the VARCHAR(20) to support more than 4 parts.
    – Mötz
    Dec 14, 2016 at 11:49
2

You could split up the string (you already know the delimiters: ".") with CHARINDEX / SUBSTR and ORDER BY the different parts. Do it in a function or do it part by part.

It won't be pretty and it won't be fast: so if you need fast queries, follow Tony or Joel.

2

NOT USİNG CODE

Insert into @table
Select 'A1' union all
Select 'A3' union all
Select 'A5' union all
Select 'A15' union all
Select 'A11' union all
Select 'A10' union all
Select 'A2' union all
Select 'B2' union all
Select 'C2' union all
Select 'C22' union all
Select 'C221' union all
Select 'A7' 

Select cod from @table
Order by LEN(cod),cod 

Result :

A1
A2
A3
A5
A7
B2
C2
A10
A11
A15
C22
C221

It's simple as:

Declare @table table(id_ int identity(1,1), cod varchar(10))

Insert into @table
Select 'A1' union all
Select 'A3' union all
Select 'A5' union all
Select 'A15' union all
Select 'A11' union all
Select 'A10' union all
Select 'A2' union all
Select 'A7' 

Select cod from @table
Order by LEN(cod),cod  
2

On PostgreSQL, it couldn't be easier:

SELECT ver_no FROM version ORDER BY string_to_array(ver_no, '.', '')::int[]

1

This would work if you're using Microsoft SQL Server:

create function fnGetVersion (@v AS varchar(50)) returns bigint as
begin
declare @n as bigint;
declare @i as int;
select @n = 0;
select @i = charindex('.',@v);
while(@i > 0)
begin
    select @n = @n * 1000;
    select @n = @n + cast(substring(@v,1,@i-1) as bigint); 
    select @v = substring(@v,@i+1,len(@v)-@i);
    select @i = charindex('.',@v);
end
return @n * 1000 + cast(@v as bigint);
end

Test by running this command:

select dbo.fnGetVersion('1.2.3.4')

That would return the number 1002003004 wich is perfectly sortable. Is you need 9.0.1 to be bigger than 2.1.2.3 then you would need to change the logic slightly. In my example 9.0.1 would be sorted before 2.1.2.3.

1

Function for PostgreSQL

Simply use

select *
  from sample_table
 order by _sort_version(column_version);




CREATE FUNCTION _sort_version (
  p_version text
)
RETURNS text AS
$body$
declare 
  v_tab text[];
begin
  v_tab := string_to_array(p_version, '.');  

  for i in 1 .. array_length(v_tab, 1) loop
    v_tab[i] := lpad(v_tab[i], 4, '0');
  end loop;

  return array_to_string(v_tab, '.');
end;
$body$
LANGUAGE 'plpgsql'
VOLATILE
CALLED ON NULL INPUT
SECURITY DEFINER
COST 1;
0

I've had the same problem, though mine was with apartment numbers like A1, A2, A3, A10, A11, etc, that they wanted to sort "right". If splitting up the version number into separate columns doesn't work, try this PL/SQL. It takes a string like A1 or A10and expands it into A0000001, A0000010, etc, so it sorts nicely. Just call this in ORDER BY clause, like

select apt_num from apartment order by PAD(apt_num)

function pad(inString IN VARCHAR2)
   return VARCHAR2

--This function pads the numbers in a alphanumeric string.
--It is particularly useful in sorting, things like "A1, A2, A10"
--which would sort like "A1, A10, A2" in a standard "ORDER BY name" clause
--but by calling "ORDER BY pkg_sort.pad(name)" it will sort as "A1, A2, A10" because this
--function will convert it to "A00000000000000000001, A00000000000000000002, A00000000000000000010" 
--(but since this is in the order by clause, it will
--not be displayed.

--currently, the charTemplate variable pads the number to 20 digits, so anything up to 99999999999999999999 
--will work correctly.
--to increase the size, just change the charTemplate variable.  If the number is larger than 20 digits, it will just
--appear without padding.


   is
      outString VARCHAR2(255);
      numBeginIndex NUMBER;
      numLength NUMBER;
      stringLength NUMBER;
      i NUMBER;
      thisChar VARCHAR2(6);
      charTemplate VARCHAR2(20) := '00000000000000000000';
      charTemplateLength NUMBER := 20;


   BEGIN
      outString := null;
      numBeginIndex := -1;
      numLength := 0;
      stringLength := length(inString);

      --loop through each character, get that character
      FOR i IN 1..(stringLength) LOOP
         thisChar := substr(inString, i, 1);

         --if this character is a number
         IF (FcnIsNumber(thisChar)) THEN

            --if we haven't started a number yet
            IF (numBeginIndex = -1) THEN
               numBeginIndex := i;
               numLength := 1;

            --else if we're in a number, increase the length
            ELSE 
               numLength := numLength + 1;
            END IF;

            --if this is the last character, we have to append the number
            IF (i = stringLength) THEN
               outString:= FcnConcatNumber(inString, outString, numBeginIndex, numLength, charTemplate, charTemplateLength);
            END IF;

         --else this is a character
         ELSE

            --if we were previously in a number, concat that and reset the numBeginIndex
            IF (numBeginIndex != -1) THEN
               outString:= FcnConcatNumber(inString, outString, numBeginIndex, numLength, charTemplate, charTemplateLength);
               numBeginIndex := -1;
               numLength := 0;
            END IF;

            --concat the character
            outString := outString || thisChar;
         END IF;
      END LOOP;

      RETURN outString;

   --any exception, just return the original string
   EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN
      RETURN inString;

   END;     
0

Here is an example query that extracts the string. You should be able to use this in either the UPDATE refactoring of the database, or simply in your query as-is. However, I'm not sure how it is on time; just something to watch out and test for.

SELECT SUBSTRING_INDEX("1.5.32",'.',1) AS MajorVersion,
  SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX("1.5.32",'.',-2),'.',1) AS MinorVersion,
  SUBSTRING_INDEX("1.5.32",'.',-1) AS Revision;

this will return:

MajorVersion | MinorVersion | Revision
1            | 5            | 32
0

Ok, if high performance is an issue then your only option is to change your values into something numeric.

However, if this is a low usage query then you can just split your numbers and order by those.

This query assumes just major and minor version numbers and that they contain just numbers.

SELECT
    *
FROM
    Requirements
WHERE
    Requirements.Release NOT LIKE '%Obsolete%'
ORDER BY
    CONVERT(int, RIGHT(REPLICATE('0', 10) + LEFT(Requirements.ReqNum, CHARINDEX('.', Requirements.ReqNum)-1), 10)),
    CONVERT(int, SUBSTRING(Requirements.ReqNum, CHARINDEX('.', Requirements.ReqNum )+1, LEN(Requirements.ReqNum) - CHARINDEX('.', Requirements.ReqNum )))
0

For the all-in-one-query purists, assuming Oracle, some instr/substr/decode/to_number voodoo can solve it:

SELECT *
FROM Requirements
WHERE Release NOT LIKE '%Obsolete%'
ORDER BY
    to_number(
      substr( reqnum, 1, instr( reqnum, '.' ) - 1 )
    )
  , to_number(
      substr( 
          reqnum
        , instr( reqnum, '.' ) + 1 -- start: after first occurance
        , decode( 
              instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 2 )
            , 0, length( reqnum )
            , instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 2 ) - 1 
          ) -- second occurance (or end)
          - instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 1) -- length: second occurance (or end) less first
      )
    )
  , to_number(
      decode( 
          instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 2 )
        , 0, null
        , substr( 
              reqnum
            , instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 2 ) + 1 -- start: after second occurance
            , decode( 
                  instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 3 )
                , 0, length( reqnum )
                , instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 3 ) - 1 
              ) -- third occurance (or end)
              - instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 2) -- length: third occurance (or end) less second
          ) 
      )
    )
  , to_number(
      decode( 
          instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 3 )
        , 0, null
        , substr( 
              reqnum
            , instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 3 ) + 1 -- start: after second occurance
            , decode( 
                  instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 4 )
                , 0, length( reqnum )
                , instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 4 ) - 1 
              ) -- fourth occurance (or end)
              - instr( reqnum, '.', 1, 3) -- length: fourth occurance (or end) less third
          ) 
      )
    )
;

I suspect there are plenty of caveats including:

  • assumption of the presence of minor version (second)
  • limited to four versions as specified in question's comments
0

Here's a comparison function for PostgreSQL that will compare arbitrary strings such that sequences of digits are compared numerically. In other words, "ABC123" > "ABC2", but "AB123" < "ABC2". It returns -1, 0, or +1 as such comparison functions usually do.

CREATE FUNCTION vercmp(a text, b text) RETURNS integer AS $$
DECLARE
   ar text[];
   br text[];
   n integer := 1;
BEGIN
   SELECT array_agg(y) INTO ar FROM (SELECT array_to_string(regexp_matches(a, E'\\d+|\\D+|^$', 'g'),'') y) x;
   SELECT array_agg(y) INTO br FROM (SELECT array_to_string(regexp_matches(b, E'\\d+|\\D+|^$', 'g'),'') y) x;
   WHILE n <= array_length(ar, 1) AND n <= array_length(br, 1) LOOP
      IF ar[n] ~ E'^\\d+$' AND br[n] ~ E'^\\d+$' THEN
         IF ar[n]::integer < br[n]::integer THEN
            RETURN -1;
         ELSIF ar[n]::integer > br[n]::integer THEN
            RETURN 1;
         END IF;
      ELSE
         IF ar[n] < br[n] THEN
            RETURN -1;
         ELSIF ar[n] > br[n] THEN
            RETURN 1;
         END IF;
      END IF;
      n := n + 1;
   END LOOP;

   IF n > array_length(ar, 1) AND n > array_length(br, 1) THEN
      RETURN 0;
   ELSIF n > array_length(ar, 1) THEN
      RETURN 1;
   ELSE
      RETURN -1;
   END IF;
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE plpgsql;

You can then create an operator class so that sorting can be done by using the comparison function with ORDER BY field USING <#:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION vernum_lt(a text, b text) RETURNS boolean AS $$
BEGIN
   RETURN vercmp(a, b) < 0;
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE plpgsql;

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION vernum_lte(a text, b text) RETURNS boolean AS $$
BEGIN
   RETURN vercmp(a, b) <= 0;
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE plpgsql;

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION vernum_eq(a text, b text) RETURNS boolean AS $$
BEGIN
   RETURN vercmp(a, b) = 0;
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE plpgsql;

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION vernum_gt(a text, b text) RETURNS boolean AS $$
BEGIN
   RETURN vercmp(a, b) > 0;
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE plpgsql;

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION vernum_gte(a text, b text) RETURNS boolean AS $$
BEGIN
   RETURN vercmp(a, b) >= 0;
END;
$$ IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE plpgsql;

CREATE OPERATOR <# ( PROCEDURE = vernum_lt, LEFTARG = text, RIGHTARG = text);
CREATE OPERATOR ># ( PROCEDURE = vernum_gt, LEFTARG = text, RIGHTARG = text);
CREATE OPERATOR =# ( PROCEDURE = vernum_lte, LEFTARG = text, RIGHTARG = text);
CREATE OPERATOR <=# ( PROCEDURE = vernum_lte, LEFTARG = text, RIGHTARG = text);
CREATE OPERATOR >=# ( PROCEDURE = vernum_gte, LEFTARG = text, RIGHTARG = text);

CREATE OPERATOR CLASS vernum_ops FOR TYPE varchar USING btree AS
  OPERATOR 1 <# (text, text),
  OPERATOR 2 <=# (text, text),
  OPERATOR 3 =#(text, text),
  OPERATOR 4 >=# (text, text),
  OPERATOR 5 ># (text, text),
  FUNCTION 1 vercmp(text, text)
;
0

FİXED THİS WAY.

<pre>
00000001    1
00000001.00000001   1.1
00000001.00000001.00000001  1.1.1
00000001.00000002   1.2
00000001.00000009   1.9
00000001.00000010   1.10
00000001.00000011   1.11
00000001.00000012   1.12
00000002    2
00000002.00000001   2.1
00000002.00000001.00000001  2.1.1
00000002.00000002   2.2
00000002.00000009   2.9
00000002.00000010   2.10
00000002.00000011   2.11
00000002.00000012   2.12

select * from (select '000000001' as tCode,'1' as Code union
select '000000001.000000001' as tCode,'1.1'as Code union
select '000000001.000000001.000000001' as tCode,'1.1.1'as Code union
select '000000001.000000002' as tCode,'1.2'  union
select '000000001.000000010' as tCode,'1.10'as Code union
select '000000001.000000011' as tCode,'1.11'as Code union
select '000000001.000000012' as tCode,'1.12'as Code union
select '000000001.000000009' as tCode,'1.9' as Code
union
select '00000002' as tCode,'2'as Code union
select '00000002.00000001' as tCode,'2.1'as Code union
select '00000002.00000001.00000001' as tCode,'2.1.1'as Code union
select '00000002.00000002' as tCode,'2.2'as Code union
select '00000002.00000010' as tCode,'2.10'as Code union
select '00000002.00000011' as tCode,'2.11'as Code union
select '00000002.00000012' as tCode,'2.12'as Code union
select '00000002.00000009' as tCode,'2.9'as Code ) as t
order by t.tCode

</pre>

<pre>


public static string GenerateToCodeOrder(this string code)
    {
        var splits = code.Split('.');
        var codes = new List<string>();
        foreach (var str in splits)
        {
            var newStr = "";
            var zeroLength = 10 - str.Length;
            for (int i = 1; i < zeroLength; i++)
            {
                newStr += "0";
            }
            newStr += str;
            codes.Add(newStr);
        }
        return string.Join(".", codes);
    }

</pre>
0
0

In M$ SQL I had issues with hierachyid with some data...

select Convert(hierarchyid, '/' + '8.3.0000.1088' + '/')

To get around this I used pasename (relies on '.' being the separator)...

Order by
convert(int, reverse (Parsename( reverse(tblSoftware.softwareVersion) , 1))),
convert(int, reverse (Parsename( reverse(tblSoftware.softwareVersion) , 2))),
convert(int, reverse (Parsename( reverse(tblSoftware.softwareVersion) , 3))),
convert(int, reverse (Parsename( reverse(tblSoftware.softwareVersion) , 4))),
convert(int, reverse (Parsename( reverse(tblSoftware.softwareVersion) , 5)))
0

If the column type for version is varchar the sorting is done as expected. This is beacuse varchar is not padded by spaces.

-1

Here is an ORACLE expression you can use in an ORDER BY:

select listagg(substr('0000000000' || column_value,-9), '.') within group(order by rownum) from xmltable(replace(version, '.',','))

assuming your version column has only dot as separator (any number of levels). (if not, up to you to change the replace by e.g. translate(version, '.-', ',,'))

3
  • I can't make sense of this, how does XMLTABLE come into this?
    – crowne
    May 25 at 10:32
  • xlmtable( string_with_comma_sep_values ) -> table of the values May 26 at 14:07
  • listagg( lpad(column_value,9,'0') ) ... is shorter. May 27 at 8:08
-3

I would do as Joel Coehoorn said. Then to re-arrange your data structure you don't have to manually do it. You can write a simple script that will do the job for all 600 records.

2
  • why add an answer identical to an existing one? Just add a comment.
    – Mark Brady
    Feb 9, 2009 at 16:45
  • FYI I wanted to add the fact that he didn't have to manually edit all records, which hadn't been pointed out yet when I posted.
    – vdsf
    Feb 9, 2009 at 17:13
-5

Just remove the dots (Inline, replace with empty string) cast the result as int and order by the result. Works great:

a.Version = 1.4.18.14

select...
Order by cast( replace (a.Version,'.','') as int) 
1
  • 1
    This doesn't work at all. 1.0.1 would become 101, and 2.0 would become 20. 101 is definitely not before 20. The OP wants a way to order by hierarchical version. Jan 14, 2014 at 21:28

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