Hi all I'm trying to test one of the ViewControllers of my project. This class has a dependency on another helper class like this:

private let dispatcher: Dispatcher = Dispatcher.sharedInstance
private var loginSync = LoginSync.sharedInstance
private var metadataSync = MetadataSync.sharedInstance

Those helper classes are used in UIViewController lifecycle like viewDidLoad or viewWillAppear. In my test I'm instantiating the ViewController class using the UIStoryboard class like this:

func testSearchBarAddedIntoNavigationViewForiOS11OrMore() {
    // Given a YourFlow ViewController embedded in a navigation controller
    let mockLoginSync = MockLoginSync()
    let storyboard = UIStoryboard(name: "Main", bundle: nil)

    // Here is too early and view controller is not instantiated yet and I can't assign the mock.
    let vc = storyboard.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "YourFlow")
    // Here is too late and viewDidLoad has already been called so assigning the mock at this point is pointless.
    let navigationController = UINavigationController(rootViewController: vc)

    // Assertion code
}

So my problem is I need to be able to mock LoginSync class. Under a normal circumstance I would use regular dependency injection by passing those helpers as arguments in the class constructor. In that case I can't do that because I'm not managing the View Controller lifecycle. So as soon as I instantiate it the helpers have already been used.

My question is: "Is there a way to do dependency injection for View controllers whose lifecycle we can't control or at least a workaround to it?

Thank you.

EDIT: So viewDidLoad was called because I was using IBOutlets in didSet overriden methods, not because of instantiateViewController being called. So I can move that code away and do injection after instantiating the view controller correctly.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

View controllers in storyboard are always initialised using init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder), so there's no way to set any properties at initialisation.

I've found the following to be a good workaround…

Rather than using

let loginSync: LoginSync

Declare as

private (set) var loginSync: LoginSync!

Declare

func configure(loginSync: LoginSync) {
    self.loginSync = loginSync
}

Then

let vc = storyboard.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "YourFlow")
vc.configure(loginSync: MockLoginSync())

You can also use this in segues…

override func prepare(for segue: UIStoryboardSegue, sender: Any?) {
    switch segue.destination) {
    case let vc as MyViewController:
        vc.configure(loginSync: MockLoginSync())
    default:
        break
    }
}

It's not perfect, but making the property private (set) ensures it can't be modified from another class, and the implicit unwrapping (!) means you'll get a crash if it's not set.

Use configure() methods in every UIView/UIViewController - once you get used to this pattern it becomes second nature.

  • I can still spot the same issue in your approach as in mine: calling instantiateViewController(withIdentifier:) method automatically calls viewDidLoad(). Which is where the loginSync is called. So after that call it is too late. What I'm looking for is a way to instantiate a IB managed UIViewController without having its viewDidLoad called straight away – Ortsinton Oct 19 at 9:23
  • No, that's incorrect. instantiateViewController(withIdentifier:) does not force viewDidLoad too be called. If it is, then you're doing something else that's forcing it to happen. Please add the source for the view controller where this is happening to your question (the minimum that shows the problem) – Ashley Mills Oct 19 at 9:36
  • Oh that's interesting. I have a breakpoint inside the viewDidLoad and it stops every time I run the test. Actually I'm overriding the didSet method of one IBOutlet. How does affect viewDidLoad being called or not? – Ortsinton Oct 19 at 9:39
  • 1
    Yes, you're right .I've commented out that code and viewDidLoad is not called yet. That makes things easier. Thank you very much! – Ortsinton Oct 19 at 9:46
  • 1
    Useful tip… if you need to override a property's didSet but don't want to force view loading, you can check the view controller's isViewLoaded property first – Ashley Mills Oct 19 at 9:49

You can wrap UIVIewControllerCreation like this:

class func createWith(injection: YourInjection) -> YourViewController {
    let storyboard = UIStoryboard(name: "Main", bundle: nil)
    let vc = storyboard.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "YourVCId") as? YourViewController
    vc.injected = injection
    return vc
}

And use it like:

let vc = YourViewController.createWith(<your injection>)

Here is an example:

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
    }

    override func viewDidAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewDidAppear(animated)

        let vc = RedViewController.createWith(injection: "some")
        navigationController?.pushViewController(vc, animated: true)
    }
}


class RedViewController: UIViewController {
    var injected: String = "" {
        didSet {
            print(#function)
        }
    }

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        view.backgroundColor = .red
        print(#function)
    }

    class func createWith(injection: String) -> RedViewController {
        let storyboard = UIStoryboard(name: "Main", bundle: nil)
        let vc = storyboard.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "Red") as! RedViewController
        vc.injected = injection
        return vc
    }
}

Storyboard setup:

enter image description here

Code running result prints:

injected
viewDidLoad()

As you can observe, injection happens before viewDidLoad()

  • That approach still has the same problem: "calling instantiateViewController() method triggers viewDidLoad, where I'm using the injected classes so it is already too late. – Ortsinton Oct 19 at 9:31
  • 1
    Sorry, but you're wrong. Update my answer with code sample. – fewlinesofcode Oct 19 at 9:41
  • 1
    You're right. I was wrong as the other colleague already helped me to spot my error. Your answer also makes sense. Thank you. – Ortsinton Oct 19 at 9:58

You need to use segues to navigate to your view controller so you can inject the dependencies during prepareForSegue like this:

override func prepareForSegue(segue: UIStoryboardSegue!, sender: AnyObject!) {
    if (segue.identifier == "SomeSegueToYourFlow") {
        if let yourFlowVC = segue.destination as? YourFlowController {
            let mockLoginSync = MockLoginSync()
            yourFlowVC.loginSync = mockLoginSync
        }
    }
}
  • How would you apply that approach inside a test? – Ortsinton Oct 19 at 9:31

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