6

Have I uncovered an actual error in the SICP book? It says:

Exercise 3.27: Memoization (also called tabulation) is a technique that enables a procedure to record, in a local table, values that have previously been computed. This technique can make a vast difference in the performance of a program. A memoized procedure maintains a table in which values of previous calls are stored using as keys the arguments that produced the values. When the memoized procedure is asked to compute a value, it first checks the table to see if the value is already there and, if so, just returns that value. Otherwise, it computes the new value in the ordinary way and stores this in the table. As an example of memoization, recall from 1.2.2 the exponential process for computing Fibonacci numbers:

(define (fib n)
  (cond ((= n 0) 0)
        ((= n 1) 1)
        (else (+ (fib (- n 1))
                 (fib (- n 2))))))

The memoized version of the same procedure is

(define memo-fib
  (memoize 
   (lambda (n)
     (cond ((= n 0) 0)
           ((= n 1) 1)
           (else 
            (+ (memo-fib (- n 1))
               (memo-fib (- n 2))))))))

where the memoizer is defined as

(define (memoize f)
  (let ((table (make-table)))
    (lambda (x)
      (let ((previously-computed-result 
             (lookup x table)))
        (or previously-computed-result
            (let ((result (f x)))
              (insert! x result table)
              result))))))

and then it says

Explain why memo-fib computes the nth Fibonacci number in a number of steps proportional to N.

The insert! and lookup procedures are defined in the book as follows:

(define (lookup key table)
  (let ((record (assoc key (cdr table))))
    (if record
        (cdr record)
        false)))

(define (assoc key records)
  (cond ((null? records) false)
        ((equal? key (caar records)) 
         (car records))
        (else (assoc key (cdr records)))))

(define (insert! key value table)
  (let ((record (assoc key (cdr table))))
    (if record
        (set-cdr! record value)
        (set-cdr! table
                  (cons (cons key value) 
                        (cdr table)))))
  'ok)

Now, assoc has number of steps proportional to n. And since lookup and insert! use assoc, they both have number of steps proportional to N.

I do not understand how memo-fib has a number of steps proportional to N. My observations are:

  • Due to the definition of the argument to memo-fib (the lambda which has n as the formal parameter), the table would have mostly ordered keys, And the keys would be looked up in an ordered way. So it is safe to assume any call to lookup would be close to a constant time operation.
  • Insert! on the other hand will not be aware that the keys would be added in some order. If a value does not exist in the table, insert! will always scan the whole list, so it would have number of steps proportional to n every time.
  • If we have n-1 elements in the table and we wish to compute (memo-fib n), it would have number of steps proportional to n due to the assoc in insert!.
  • If we have no keys, then (memo-fib n) would have number of steps proportional to n2 due to insert! being called every recursive call to memo-fib.

If lookup and insert! are constant then it would make sense for memo-fib to have number of steps proportional to n. But the real number of steps looks like n * (n-k) where k is the number of keys already in the table.

Am I doing it wrong? What am I missing?

7
  • 2
    it is regrettable that user stackoverflow.com/users/7954294/rain1 had deleted their excellent and valuable answer.
    – Will Ness
    Oct 24, 2018 at 16:43
  • @Will Ness yeah, it disappeared. Hope you saw my last question to you before it got deleted. Oct 24, 2018 at 16:46
  • 1
    to your last point: when (memo-fib 6) first calls lookup, the table is still empty. if you then call (memo-fib 60) then yes, the lookups will needlessly scan through the 6-long table 54 times; that is still O(n), technically. It might be useful then to have another implementation, memo-fib-no-share, which does not share tables between calls. An interesting exercise. :)
    – Will Ness
    Oct 24, 2018 at 16:46
  • 1
    I'm sure you were on the verge of accepting it, too. eventually you would. :) I'm not sure whether the accepted answers can be even deleted by their owners.
    – Will Ness
    Oct 24, 2018 at 16:48
  • @Will Ness I think the only thing needed to be done is to remove the needless assoc in insert!. Then it would become perfectly O(1). And now the whole memo-fib can be O(n). Wouldn't you agree? Oct 24, 2018 at 16:50

1 Answer 1

1

Looks like you were right. It does run at about quadratic "complexity", empirically. The assoc in insert! is not needed at all; removing it doesn't change the return value and only makes it run much much faster.

To make the tests cleaner I've changed the memoization to not share the table between the calls.

#lang r5rs

(#%require srfi/19)

(define false #f)
(define true #t)

(define (memoize f)
   (let ((table (make-table)))
    (lambda (x)
      (let ((previously-computed-result 
             (lookup x table)))
        (or previously-computed-result
            (let ((result (f x)))
              (insert! x result table)
              result))))))

(define (lookup key table)
  (let ((record (assoc key (cdr table))))
    (if record
        (cdr record)
        false)))

(define (assoc key records)
  (cond ((null? records) false)
        ((equal? key (caar records)) 
         (car records))
        (else (assoc key (cdr records)))))

(define (insert! key value table)
  (let ((record #f                                 ; NB
                ; (assoc key (cdr table))          ; NB
                ))
    (if record
        (set-cdr! record value)
        (set-cdr! table
                  (cons (cons key value) 
                        (cdr table)))))
  'ok)

(define (make-table)
   (list '*table*))

(define memo-fib      
  (lambda (n)
    (letrec ((mf (memoize                          ; NB
                  (lambda (n)
                    (cond ((= n 0) 0)
                          ((= n 1) 1)
                          (else 
                           (+ (mf (- n 1))
                              (mf (- n 2)))))))))
      (mf n))))

(define (tt n)
  (let* ((t1 (current-time))
         (f  (memo-fib n))
         (t2 (current-time))
         (td (time-difference t2 t1))
         (n  (time-nanosecond td)))
    (/
       (+ (* (time-second td) 1000000000)
          n)
       1000000.0)))   ; time in milliseconds

; > (memo-fib 100)
; 354224848179261915075

(define (tt2 n1 n2)
  (let* ((t1 (tt n1))
         (t2 (tt n2)))
    (values t1 t2
            (cond ((> t1 0)
                   (/ (log (/ t2 t1)) (log (/ n2 n1))))))))

The testing is done in a very rudimentary fashion. Times are in milliseconds.

; with the lookup in insert!:
;         n1   n2        t1     t2       a  in t ~ n^a, empirically
; > (tt2 2000 3000) ;=>  90.0  200.0  1.96936
; > (tt2 2000 3000) ;=> 100.0  220.0  1.94457
; > (tt2 2000 3000) ;=>  90.0  210.0  2.08969

; without the lookup: 80,000 takes under 1 second
; but run times are wildly erratic

So it indeed looks like an oversight by the authors, their use of the general insert! procedure where in fact we know we only insert new entries into the table -- because we memoize the function in the first place!

So, insert! should be replaced by insert-new!:

(define (memoize f)
   (let ((table (make-table)))
    (lambda (x)
      (let ((previously-computed-result 
             (lookup x table)))
        (or previously-computed-result
            (let ((result (f x)))
              (insert-new! x result table)
              result))))))

(define (insert-new! key value table)
  (set-cdr! table
                  (cons (cons key value) 
                        (cdr table)))
  'ok)

and then is should become linear.

6
  • I'd like to see how this compares to the iterative fib procedure in your test. Have you seen my data in chat? the last one, the first one is horribly wrong. Does the inser! without lookup runs the same as the iterative fib? Oct 25, 2018 at 9:49
  • 1
    I'll run that when I get a chance. Although, the numbers become so big that it might become more about by the bignum handling. We'll see. your times in the chat are inconclusive. small times can be unreliable. that's why I tested at 1.5x ratio of the sizes, not the 10x like you showed.
    – Will Ness
    Oct 25, 2018 at 14:44
  • is it possible, by any chance, the authors wants us to consider the insert! and lookup as black box abstractions? Maybe assume that the number of steps they are talking about are only inside the memoize procedure and we're not suppose to care on how the table operations perform? Oct 25, 2018 at 15:21
  • the run times are too erratic, when I run this in DrRacket (even though I have debugging and profiling turned off). Some more reliable form of testing should be used. But in general, the "normal" iterative Fibonacci runs about twice faster than the fast memoized version, at 30000...60000, although the memoized version is much more likely to cause a garbage collection, presumably, in which case it runs 20x slower, not just twice. but, again, the times are too erratic, jump wildly.
    – Will Ness
    Oct 25, 2018 at 15:33
  • to your other question, I don't know; this looks like an actual error.
    – Will Ness
    Oct 25, 2018 at 15:37

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