1

I would like to transform a plain rsync command, which copies one file (robots.txt) to the target sub-folders situated at 1 level depth (maxdepth -1) into a multi-threaded command, using parallel, or any other solution which speeds up transfer :

Plain rsync:

find /home/targetfolders* -maxdepth 1 -type d  -exec rsync -av /home/source/utils/robots.txt {} \;

What would be the best solution ?

4
  • Why do you want to do this? It is unlikely to be much faster than doing it serially. Commented Oct 20, 2018 at 9:35
  • What do you mean by serially? Using plane cp command? find /var/www/* -maxdepth 1 -type d -exec cp /home/wiserwires/utils/robots.txt {} \; Commented Oct 20, 2018 at 15:13
  • By "serially", I mean "one after the other, that is, not in parallel". Commented Oct 20, 2018 at 15:48
  • There are more than 20k subfolders, I've already deployed robots.txt using the plain command but I'm sure that using 16 parallel threads would be much faster. Am I wrong? Commented Oct 20, 2018 at 18:39

1 Answer 1

1

Not sure I think this is a good idea, but if you want to do it with GNU Parallel, you would be looking at something like this:

find /home/targetfolders* -maxdepth 1 -type d -print0 | 
  parallel -j 16 -0 rsync -av /home/source/utils/robots.txt {}
2
  • It worked perfectly, thanks! Definitely there is a speed improvement, it's important to adjust the core/process ratio. Commented Oct 21, 2018 at 8:00
  • Ok, good. If you do this often, it might be worth writing a little Perl script and calliing that instead of rsync. It would take a whole list of directories as parameters and then you would call it using parallel -0 -X script.pl. That way rather than executing a whole new rsync process for each file, you would just call a Perl function instead and it should be lighter weight. Commented Oct 21, 2018 at 8:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.