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I want to understand the speed difference between select and $ to subset columns in R (whilst appreciating that they do not return exactly the same things, rather both perform the conceptual get-me-a-column operation). I would like to understand when either is most appropriate.

Specifically, under what conditions would the following select statement be faster than the corresponding $ statement?

Syntax is:

select(df, colName1, colName2, ...)
df$colName
  • 5
    select is in the dplyr package, $ is base R. select allows selection/deselection of one or more, as well as sub-verbs like everything(); $ supports single-element (i.e., "column") only. $ does partial matching (e.g., mtcars$cy vice $cyl), select requires perfect matches. – r2evans Oct 20 '18 at 5:44
  • are there no speed improvements in select? – Nikhil Mishra Oct 20 '18 at 5:55
  • 1
    microbenchmark::microbenchmark(select(mtcars, cyl), mtcars$cyl) suggests quite the opposite: select appears (in that one isolated test) to be 2 orders of magnitude slower. Though some things in dplyr may be faster, I believe a lot of its value is standardizing some things (e.g., ifelse), facilitating readable and intuitive flow of data massaging, and some other things ... speed is not necessarily one of them (or highest on the list). – r2evans Oct 20 '18 at 6:02
2

In summary, you should use dplyr when speed of development, ease of understanding or ease of maintenance is most important.

  • Benchmarks below show that the operation takes longer with dplyr than base R equivalents.
  • dplyr returns a different (more complex) object.
  • Base R $ and similar operations can be faster to execute, but come with additional risks (e.g. partial matching behaviour); may be harder to read and/to maintain; return a (minimal) vector object, which might be missing some of the contextual richness of a data frame.

This might also help tease out (if one is wont to avoid looking at source code of packages) that dplyr is doing alot of work under the hood to target columns. It's also an unfair test since we get back different things, but all the ops are "give me this column" ops, so read it with that context:

library(dplyr)

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  base1 = mtcars$cyl, # returns a vector
  base2 = mtcars[['cyl', exact = TRUE]], # returns a vector
  base2a = mtcars[['cyl', exact = FALSE]], # returns a vector
  base3 = mtcars[,"cyl"], # returns a vector
  base4 = subset(mtcars, select = cyl), # returns a 1 column data frame
  dplyr1 = dplyr::select(mtcars, cyl), # returns a 1 column data frame
  dplyr2 = dplyr::select(mtcars, "cyl"), # returns a 1 column data frame
  dplyr3 = dplyr::pull(mtcars, cyl), # returns a vector
  dplyr4 = dplyr::pull(mtcars, "cyl") # returns a vector
)
## Unit: microseconds
##    expr     min       lq       mean   median        uq      max neval
##   base1   4.682   6.3860    9.23727   7.7125   10.6050   25.397   100
##   base2   4.224   5.9905    9.53136   7.7590   11.1095   27.329   100
##  base2a   3.710   5.5380    7.92479   7.0845   10.1045   16.026   100
##   base3   6.312  10.9935   13.99914  13.1740   16.2715   37.765   100
##   base4  51.084  70.3740   92.03134  76.7350   95.9365  662.395   100
##  dplyr1 698.954 742.9615  978.71306 784.8050 1154.6750 3568.188   100
##  dplyr2 711.925 749.2365 1076.32244 808.9615 1146.1705 7875.388   100
##  dplyr3  64.299  78.3745  126.97205  85.3110  112.1000 2383.731   100
##  dplyr4  63.235  73.0450   99.28021  85.1080  114.8465  263.219   100

But, what if we have alot of columns:

# Make a wider version of mtcars
do.call(
  cbind.data.frame,
  lapply(1:20, function(i) setNames(mtcars, sprintf("%s_%d", colnames(mtcars), i)))
) -> mtcars_manycols

# I randomly chose to get "cyl_4"
microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  base1 = mtcars_manycols$cyl_4, # returns a vector
  base2 = mtcars_manycols[['cyl_4', exact = TRUE]], # returns a vector
  base2a = mtcars_manycols[['cyl_4', exact = FALSE]], # returns a vector
  base3 = mtcars_manycols[,"cyl_4"], # returns a vector
  base4 = subset(mtcars_manycols, select = cyl_4), # returns a 1 column data frame
  dplyr1 = dplyr::select(mtcars_manycols, cyl_4), # returns a 1 column data frame
  dplyr2 = dplyr::select(mtcars_manycols, "cyl_4"), # returns a 1 column data frame
  dplyr3 = dplyr::pull(mtcars_manycols, cyl_4), # returns a vector
  dplyr4 = dplyr::pull(mtcars_manycols, "cyl_4") # returns a vector
)
## Unit: microseconds
##    expr      min        lq       mean    median        uq       max neval
##   base1    4.534    6.8535   12.15802    8.7865   13.1775    75.095   100
##   base2    4.150    6.5390   11.59937    9.3005   13.2220    73.332   100
##  base2a    3.904    5.9755   10.73095    7.5820   11.2715    61.687   100
##   base3    6.255   11.5270   16.42439   13.6385   18.6910    70.106   100
##   base4   66.175   89.8560  118.37694   99.6480  122.9650   340.653   100
##  dplyr1 1970.706 2155.4170 3051.18823 2443.1130 3656.1705  9354.698   100
##  dplyr2 1995.165 2169.9520 3191.28939 2554.2680 3765.9420 11550.716   100
##  dplyr3  124.295  142.9535  216.89692  166.7115  209.1550  1138.368   100
##  dplyr4  127.280  150.0575  195.21398  169.5285  209.0480   488.199   100

For a ton of projects, dplyr is a great choice. Speed of execution, however, is very often not an attribute of the "tidyverse" but the speed of development and expressiveness usually outweigh the speed difference.

NOTE: dplyr verbs are likely better candidates than subset() and — while I lazily use $ it's also a tad dangerous due to default partial matching behaviour as is [[]] without exact=TRUE. A good habit (IMO) to get into is setting options(warnPartialMatchDollar = TRUE) in all your projects where you aren't knowingly counting on this behaviour.

1

It is not the same. If you're looking for the same functionality you could consider pull() from the same dplyr package. Dollarsign returns a vector 'build' from the dataframe, pull does the same.

0

select is in the dplyr package, part of the tidyverse. https://dplyr.tidyverse.org/

you might do something like

df %>% 
  select(colName1, colName2)

Which would select those columns from df. These statements are written like verbs (e.g. select, arrange, group_by, etc.) and makes it much easier to work with data.

$ is from base r. It would show you only that column from df.

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