11

I am trying to create a configuration properties class that has a recursive class, structured similarly to a linked list. I'm using Spring boot 2.0.6.RELEASE, and the class is being autowired using @EnableConfigurationProperties({EnginealConfig.class}).

The issue I am having is that only one the first level will be bound to the Test object, x.test will never get set.

Using the following application.properties file:

engineal.x.value: "Test1"
engineal.x.test.value: "Test2"
engineal.x.test.test.value: "Test3"

And the following configuration properties class:

@ConfigurationProperties(prefix = "engineal")
public class EnginealConfig {

    static class Test {

        private String value;
        private Test test;

        public String getValue() {
            return value;
        }

        public void setValue(String value) {
            this.value = value;
        }

        public Test getTest() {
            return test;
        }

        public void setTest(Test test) {
            this.test = test;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Test{" +
                    "value='" + value + '\'' +
                    ", test=" + test +
                    '}';
        }
    }

    private Test x;

    public Test getX() {
        return x;
    }

    public void setX(Test x) {
        this.x = x;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "EnginealConfig{" +
                "x=" + x +
                '}';
    }
}

the object will print EnginealConfig{x=Test{value='Test1', test=null}}. Unfortunately the recursion is not working.

After messing around trying different things to get this to work, I tried changing EnginealConfig#Test.test from private Test test; to private List<Test> test;, along with the getters and setters. Then by using lists with one element, this recursion works.

The following application.properties with the List<Test> change:

engineal.x.value: "Test1"
engineal.x.test[0].value: "Test2"
engineal.x.test[0].test[0].value: "Test3"

will output EnginealConfig{x=Test{value='Test1', test=[Test{value='Test2', test=[Test{value='Test3', test=null}]}]}}. I can then access the next element by using test.get(0).

So it appears as if recursion is supported only if the recursive type is in a collection.

While this workaround is ok, I would prefer to use my first way of doing it. Are/should recursive classes be supported without needing a collection? Thank you for your help!

  • 1
    I believe this might be solved by using a custom converter (/w @ConfigurationPropertiesBinding) but SpringBoot 2.x currently ignores the annotated object and there is a related issue here: github.com/spring-projects/spring-boot/issues/13285 – emrekgn Apr 2 at 15:33
  • This post could help you, seems you need spring-configuration-metadata.json. – Luis Muñoz Apr 3 at 3:08
  • 1
    Thanks for your comment @LuisMuñoz, however, according to that article and docs.spring.io/spring-boot/docs/current/reference/html/…, spring-configuration-metadata.json seems like it will only provide autocompletion in the IDE; and won't affect the actual config binding, which is where my issue lies. With that being mentioned, the spring-boot-configuration-processor throws a StackOverflowException with the example class I have provided, so it's apparent that it's unable to handle this recursive structure either. – engineAL Apr 3 at 14:48
  • 2
    Worth a bug report to Spring guys! – Luis Muñoz Apr 3 at 14:56
  • 1
1

Just set your inner class as an individual class, then everything would work well.

application.yml

simple:
  value: aa
  myTest:
    value: lower

config class

@ConfigurationProperties(prefix = "simple")
@Data //It is for getter setter
public class SimpleConfig {

    private String value;

    private MyTest myTest;
}

the recursion class

@Data
public class MyTest {
    private String value;
    private MyTest myTest;
}

Test case

@Resource
private SimpleConfig simpleConfig;

@Test
public void myTest(){

    String value = simpleConfig.getValue();
    System.out.println("outerValue : " + value);
    String innerValue = simpleConfig.getMyTest().getValue();
    System.out.println("innerValue :" + innerValue);
}

result

outerValue : aa
innerValue :lower
  • That only works for the first layer though. If you add another layer (ie: simple.myTest.myTest.value, so there will actually be a recursion), Spring will detect the recursion and assign "null" to it. – Naeramarth Apr 8 at 9:39
  • Well "assigning null" is not exactly the correct way to say it, but I think you know what I mean. – Naeramarth Apr 8 at 13:36
  • yeah i just tried.it is like what you said.but I think I found a way to do this by rewrite something – wl.GIG Apr 8 at 13:59
0
@ConfigurationProperties(prefix = "engineal")
public class EnginealConfig {

    static class Test {
        //@NestedConfigurationProperty
        private String value;

        @NestedConfigurationProperty
        private Test test;

You may annotate the field with @NestedConfigurationProperty annotation.

  • 1
    Unfortunately, this answer does not solve the issue. Adding @NestedConfigurationProperty to the field EnginealConfig#Test.test still results in the same exact configuration: EnginealConfig{x=Test{value='Test1', test=null}} – engineAL Apr 1 at 15:59
  • 3
    It is actually stated that "this annotation has no bearing on the actual binding processes" in the docs: docs.spring.io/spring-boot/docs/current/api/org/springframework/… – emrekgn Apr 2 at 15:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.