6

I have the following code which follows a pattern of loops , I have a feeling that code can be minified to a recursion like code or any less ugly looking code , but I am unable to figure it out.

I want to run six loops one inside the other from 1000 to 10000 in javascript, I look to minify the code if possible.

I am beginner in coding , but all kinds of methods are acceptable for me.

I am updating the code as previous code might get ambigous for some users.

function dummyFunc(x,y){
    if( some logic for x == some logic for y){
         return true;
    }
    return false;
}

for(var i = 1000;i < 10000;i++){
  for(var j = 1000;j < 10000;j++){
    if(dummyFunc(i,j)){
      for(var k = 1000;k < 10000;k++){
        if(dummyFunc(j,k)){
          for(var l = 1000;l < 10000;l++){
            if(dummyFunc(k,l)){
              for(var m = 1000;m < 10000;m++){
                if(dummyFunc(l,m)){
                  for(var n = 1000;n < 10000;n++){
                     if(dummyFunc(m,n)){
                        break;
                     }
                  }
                }
              }
            }
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
}
  • 4
    What are you trying to do with that code in the first place? Repeating something 9000^6 times seems... interesting. – str Oct 21 '18 at 12:42
  • I am applying the code for some project work which I can't disclose – R K Oct 21 '18 at 12:44
  • 1
    If we assume that your browser makes 1000 * 1000 iterations per second, this will take 1000 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000 seconds to complete. That is very long (317 centuries) – Jonas Wilms Oct 21 '18 at 12:50
  • For time being , the code simplicity matters this time for my work than the execution time – R K Oct 21 '18 at 12:52
  • 1
    I think this is an example of the X Y problem (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XY_problem). Could you tell us what you want to achieve, instead of asking how to achieve your complicated solution? – Tvde1 Oct 30 '18 at 13:36
7

You could extract the for loop into a function:

 function range(start, end, callback) {
   for(let i = start, start < end, i++)
     callback(i);
 }

That can be used as:

 range(1000, 10000, i => {
   range(1000, 10000, j => {
     range(1000, 10000, k => {
       range(1000, 10000, l => {
        range(1000, 10000, m => {
          range(1000, 10000, n => {
            console.log(i, j, k, l, m, n);
         });
       });
     });
   });
 });

To simplify that even further, you could use a generator that yields an array of values which you can destructured:

  function* ranges(start, end, repeats) {
    if(repeats > 1) {
      for(const values of ranges(start, end, repeats - 1)) {
         for(const value of ranges(start, end, 0)) {
             yield values.concat(value);
         }
      }
    } else {
      for(let i = start; i < end; i++) 
        yield [i];
   }
}

That can be used as:

  for(const [i, j, k, l, m, n] of ranges(1000, 10000, 6)) {
     console.log(i, j, k, l, m, n);
  }
  • 1
    why you are making it even more complex??? – user10543871 Oct 24 '18 at 17:35
  • 2
    @k_1234 cause the OP asked for it. He wants "less compact" code – Jonas Wilms Oct 24 '18 at 18:31
  • 3
    He wants minified code. meaning smaller code. – m__ Oct 24 '18 at 18:54
  • incorrect syntax, no checks for dummyFunc in loops, no minify – Eugene Mihaylin Oct 30 '18 at 9:20
2
+25

Use the following code. Instead of returning true or false, you should start the loop inside the dummyFunc, this will call the function recursively.

function dummyFunc(x,y){
    if( some logic for x == some logic for y)
        for(var i = 1000;i < 10000;i++)
            for(var j = 1000;j < 10000;j++)
                dummyFunc(i,j);
}

for(var i = 1000;i < 10000;i++)
   for(var j = 1000;j < 10000;j++)
      dummyFunc(i,j);

To add clarity to how recursive function is working (writing in usual recursive function style - return is some condition is satisfied else call function again) you may write it as follows

function dummyFunc(x,y){
    if( !(some logic for x == some logic for y))
         return;

    for(var i = 1000;i < 10000;i++)
        for(var j = 1000;j < 10000;j++)
            dummyFunc(i,j);
}

for(var i = 1000;i < 10000;i++)
   for(var j = 1000;j < 10000;j++)
      dummyFunc(i,j);
1

Based on the code you provided, you could simplify with the following:

function dummyFunc(x,y){
    if( some logic for x == some logic for y){
         return true;
    }
    return false;
}

for(var i = 1000;i < 10000;i++) {
  for(var j = 1000;j < 10000;j++) {
    if(dummyFunc(i,j)) {
      break;
    }
  }
}

You could argue I am taking your example too literally, but hopefully it either answers your question or illustrates why you need a better example to get a better answer.

1

Here is your complete simplified code

function getDeeper(i, j, start, end, level) {
    if(j === end && (i = (i+1)) && (j = start)) {}
    if(dummyFunc(i, j)) {
        if(level === 4) return;
        getDeeper(j, start, start, end, ++level); 
    }
    getDeeper(i, ++j, start, end, level);
}

getDeeper(1000, 1000, 1000, 10000, 0);
  • You can traverse deeper as much as you want, only by specifying the level. More generic structure – Nattamai Jawaharlal Manikandan Oct 30 '18 at 15:09
1

Since your question is How do I minify the following series of for loops into a less compact code? and is not specifically asking for a better code example I will instead show you how to fish instead of giving you the fish.

You need to read about Structured program theorem:

It states that a class of control flow graphs (historically called charts in this context) can compute any computable function if it combines subprograms in only three specific ways (control structures). These are

  1. Executing one subprogram, and then another subprogram (sequence)
  2. Executing one of two subprograms according to the value of a boolean expression (selection)
  3. Repeatedly executing a subprogram as long as a boolean expression is true (iteration)

Also worth reading is Flow Diagrams, Turing Machines And Languages With Only Two Formation Rules by Corrado Bohm and Giuseppe Jacopini for whom the theorem is named after.

So if I understand you code correctly then while the example looks like a long task when computed as such

If we assume that your browser makes 1000 * 1000 iterations per second, this will take 1000 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000 seconds to complete. That is very long (317 centuries)

as noted by Jonas Wilms,

from my extensive experience with predicates which is that a predicate will only return true or false and if you know that once it is true you can stop processing because you have the result. On the other hand if the result is false then you need to process all of the results. The real trick is not to brute force through all of the values but to quickly eliminate combinations of inputs that don't help lead to a solution.

While I don't know exactly what you are trying to do, I would also take a look at Binary decision diagram and/or Constraint satisfaction which are great ways to simplify complex problems.

  • Actually its worse, there are 9000 iterations so we are talking about thousands of centuries ... :) (but thanks for referencing and great answer :)) – Jonas Wilms Oct 30 '18 at 16:37
  • @JonasWilms I take it that some of what I presented in my answer was new to you. It always amazes me how much information is here on these sites but as I have shown, it is often buried in obscurity behind questions. – Guy Coder Oct 30 '18 at 16:49
  • "Ich weiß, das ich nichts weiß" ~ Albert Einstein. That said, I'm neither a CS student nor am I really interested in theoretical sciences. So your guess is right, I've never heard of those theorems, but I actually never needed them. – Jonas Wilms Oct 30 '18 at 18:30
0

I'm still not sure why exactly you would want to do this, but below are two potential solutions depending on the behavior you want at the "break". Neither is very pretty, but they both work for the problem described.

Solution (A) - breaks only the inner-most loop, which would exactly match the behavior described in the question.

function loopenstein(minn, maxx, maxDepth, dummyCall) {

  function recursiveLoop(i, minn, maxx, depth, dummyCall) {
    for (var j = minn; j < maxx; j++)
      if (dummyFunc(i, j)) {
        if (depth <= 0) {
          console.log("break me daddy...")
          return;
        }
        recursiveLoop(j, minn, maxx, depth - 1, dummyCall)) 
      }
  }
  for (var i = minn; i < maxx; i++) {
        recursiveLoop(i, minn, maxx, maxDepth, dummyCall))
  }
}
/* usage */
loopenstein(1000, 10000, 6, dummyFunc)

Solution (B) - breaks completely out of all loops once dummyFunc returns true for the 6th loop.

function loopenstein(minn, maxx, maxDepth, dummyCall) {
  //recursive helper function
  function loopensteinHelper(i, minn, maxx, depth, dummyCall) {
    for (var j = minn; j < maxx; j++)
      if (dummyFunc(i, j)) {
        if (depth <= 0) {
          console.log("break me daddy...")
          return true;

        } else if (loopensteinHelper(j, minn, maxx, depth - 1, dummyCall)) {
          return true;
      }
    return false;
  }

  for (var i = minn; i < maxx; i++) {
    if (loopensteinHelper(i, minn, maxx, maxDepth, dummyCall)) {
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}
/* usage */
var isFound = loopenstein(1000, 10000, 6, dummyFunc)
0

the same for loop repeated each time so you can move it inside the function

function dummyFunc(x) {
    for (y = 1000; y < 10000; y++) {
        if (some logic for x == some logic for y) {
            return y;
        }
    }
    return false;
}


for (var i = 1000; i < 10000; i++) {
    if (j = dummyFunc(i)) {
        if (k = dummyFunc(j)) {
            if (l = dummyFunc(k)) {
                if (m = dummyFunc(l)) {
                    if (n = dummyFunc(m)) {
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

this solution if you need i,j,k,l,m and n variables if you don't need those variables by using recursive function this solution gives the equal to n variable in your question

function dummyFunc(x) {
    numberOfLoops = 6;
    for (y = 1000; y < 10000; y++) {
        if (some logic forr x == some logic forr y) {
            if (numberOfLoops == 0) {
                return n;
            }
            n=dummyFunc(x)
            numberOfLoops--;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
for (var i = 1000; i < 10000; i++) {
    n = dummyFunc(i)
}

I haven't check my code , your comments would be helpful

-1

Well since they're all single-line statements you can leave out the curly braces. Makes the code half the size but not less ugly:

for(let i = 1000;i < 10000;i++)
    for(let j = 1000;j < 10000;j++)
      if(dummyFunc(i,j))
        for(let k = 1000;k < 10000;k++)
          if(dummyFunc(j,k))
            for(let l = 1000;l < 10000;l++)
              if(dummyFunc(k,l))
                for(let m = 1000;m < 10000;m++)
                  if(dummyFunc(l,m))
                    for(let n = 1000;n < 10000;n++)
                       if(dummyFunc(m,n)) break;
-2

I would recommend to use promise. Below is the modified version of the code:

var looper = function(start = 1000, end = 10000) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        console.log('Starting');
        for (; start <= end; start++) {
            // Your computation goes here
        }
        resolve();
    });
}

Now if you want to run a loop 3 times use it like:

looper().then(looper()).then(looper())

If you need to run loop 4 times use as:

looper().then(looper()).then(looper()).then(looper())

You can learn more about Promises here

  • no need to use a promise for synchronous code... – lucascaro Oct 30 '18 at 0:08

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