63

I read the tutorial: http://drnicwilliams.com/2006/11/21/diy-widgets/ for XSS Widgets by Dr. Nic.

I'm looking for a way to pass parameters to the script tag. For example, to make the following work:

<script src="http://path/to/widget.js?param_a=1&param_b=3">

Is there a way to do this?


UPDATE: Two interesting links:

10 Answers 10

82

I apologise for replying to a super old question but after spending an hour wrestling with the above solutions I opted for simpler stuff.

<script src=".." one="1" two="2"></script>

Inside above script:

document.currentScript.getAttribute('one'); //1
document.currentScript.getAttribute('two'); //2

Much easier than jquery OR url parsing.

You might need the polyfil for doucment.currentScript from @Yared Rodriguez's answer for IE:

document.currentScript = document.currentScript || (function() {
  var scripts = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
  return scripts[scripts.length - 1];
})();
  • 3
    Note that currentScript does not work in IE. Details – Dehli Nov 6 '15 at 15:28
  • I did add an polyfill for IE in the answer. Does the polyfill not work? – Richard Fox Nov 8 '15 at 20:01
  • It's also not compliant with HTML5. – takendarkk Feb 3 '16 at 21:30
  • Do you have a source for that this says its ok. – Richard Fox Apr 7 '16 at 12:49
  • 2
    the polyfill does not work anymore, document.currentScript is read only and cannot be assigned if it already exist. maybe a different check like if(!document.currentScript) { *** the polyfill function *** } would work better – fadomire Mar 16 '17 at 19:34
55

It's better to Use feature in html5 5 data Attributes

<script src="http://path.to/widget.js" data-width="200" data-height="200">
</script>

Inside the script file http://path.to/widget.js you can get the paremeters in that way:

<script>
function getSyncScriptParams() {
         var scripts = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
         var lastScript = scripts[scripts.length-1];
         var scriptName = lastScript;
         return {
             width : scriptName.getAttribute('data-width'),
             height : scriptName.getAttribute('data-height')
         };
 }
</script>
  • What if the id="myAwesomeWigretNo1" is not alwas like that but myAwesomeWigretNo2, or myAwesomeWigretNo681 ??? How can I fix this to accept a real variable? – Pathros Jun 4 '15 at 18:30
  • What do you mean by "accept a real variable"? – OBender Jul 28 '15 at 8:53
  • 8
    For what it's worth, there are other ways to reference the script instead, such as document.currentScript (only works for scripts not in their own file) and putting an id on the <script> tag and then finding it by that. – Thunderforge Jan 12 '16 at 20:39
  • And what if the ID was changed by some other programmer in your team that had no clue that you use this id ? – OBender Jan 19 '16 at 23:32
  • 1
    If you load scripts asynchronously then using an ID is the only reliable option I would recommend. Thanks @Thunderforge ... Also, any programmer should refrain from refactoring a code without a proper sprint plan overviewed by someone who has a clue of what's going on ;) – Luca Borrione Apr 27 '16 at 16:54
17

Got it. Kind of a hack, but it works pretty nice:

var params = document.body.getElementsByTagName('script');
query = params[0].classList;
var param_a = query[0];
var param_b = query[1];
var param_c = query[2];

I pass the params in the script tag as classes:

<script src="http://path.to/widget.js" class="2 5 4"></script>

This article helped a lot.

  • 1
    The article is awesome! – Bartek Skwira Jan 29 '14 at 14:52
  • 10
    Classes should be used to styling element not to pass parameters. – kspacja Mar 17 '15 at 15:31
  • 4
    @kspacja Yeah and HTML should contain content only without styling, except we have to precisely order our DIV tags for float and column layouts because CSS can't actually do the job, and we're somehow OK with that. Hack away, I say. But you can use "data-" attributes if you want to avoid conflict or you're the type to lose sleep over it. – Jason C Oct 28 '15 at 22:01
11

JQuery has a way to pass parameters from HTML to javascript:

Put this in the myhtml.html file:

<!-- Import javascript -->
<script src="//code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.2.min.js"></script>
<!-- Invoke a different javascript file called subscript.js -->
<script id="myscript" src="subscript.js" video_filename="foobar.mp4">/script>

In the same directory make a subscript.js file and put this in there:

//Use jquery to look up the tag with the id of 'myscript' above.  Get 
//the attribute called video_filename, stuff it into variable filename.
var filename = $('#myscript').attr("video_filename");

//print filename out to screen.
document.write(filename);

Analyze Result:

Loading the myhtml.html page has 'foobar.mp4' print to screen. The variable called video_filename was passed from html to javascript. Javascript printed it to screen, and it appeared as embedded into the html in the parent.

jsfiddle proof that the above works:

http://jsfiddle.net/xqr77dLt/

7

If you are using jquery you might want to consider their data method.

I have used something similar to what you are trying in your response but like this:

<script src="http://path.to/widget.js" param_a = "2" param_b = "5" param_c = "4">
</script>

You could also create a function that lets you grab the GET params directly (this is what I frequently use):

function $_GET(q,s) {
    s = s || window.location.search;
    var re = new RegExp('&'+q+'=([^&]*)','i');
    return (s=s.replace(/^\?/,'&').match(re)) ? s=s[1] : s='';
}

// Grab the GET param
var param_a = $_GET('param_a');
6

Another way is to use meta tags. Whatever data is supposed to be passed to your JavaScript can be assigned like this:

<meta name="yourdata" content="whatever" />
<meta name="moredata" content="more of this" />

The data can then be pulled from the meta tags like this (best done in a DOMContentLoaded event handler):

var data1 = document.getElementsByName('yourdata')[0].content;
var data2 = document.getElementsByName('moredata')[0].content;

Absolutely no hassle with jQuery or the likes, no hacks and workarounds necessary, and works with any HTML version that supports meta tags...

  • Sounds like a good idea. Can someone explain why they marked it down please? (should be a given .. you mark down, you explain why). (nb: I marked it up again, so it is now zero). – www-0av-Com Mar 3 '18 at 20:49
  • I thought this method was by far the easiest method them all. It works like a charm and gives me exactly what I need. Great question and Fantastic solution! – arios Oct 8 '18 at 16:58
3

Thanks to the jQuery, a simple HTML5 compliant solution is to create an extra HTML tag, like div, to store the data.

HTML:

<div id='dataDiv' data-arg1='content1' data-arg2='content2'>
  <button id='clickButton'>Click me</button>
</div>

JavaScript:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var fetchData = $("#dataDiv").data('arg1') + 
                    $("#dataDiv").data('arg2') ;

    $('#clickButton').click(function() {
      console.log(fetchData);
    })
});

Live demo with the code above: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/KzzNmQ?editors=1011#0

On the live demo, one can see the data from HTML5 data-* attributes to be concatenated and printed to the log.

Source: https://api.jquery.com/data/

  • 1
    Went through some of the other solutions, but this was the one that worked the best and also is pretty simple to implement. thanks! – Erik Kalkoken Feb 4 '17 at 12:46
  • This should be the accepted solution, as it allows you to reference the script by ID and is valid HTML5. – Tim S Sep 6 '17 at 12:53
3

it is a very old thread, I know but this might help too if somebody gets here once they search for a solution.

Basically I used the document.currentScript to get the element from where my code is running and I filter using the name of the variable I am looking for. I did it extending currentScript with a method called "get", so we will be able to fetch the value inside that script by using:

document.currentScript.get('get_variable_name');

In this way we can use standard URI to retrieve the variables without adding special attributes.

This is the final code

document.currentScript.get = function(variable) {
    if(variable=(new RegExp('[?&]'+encodeURIComponent(variable)+'=([^&]*)')).exec(this.src))
    return decodeURIComponent(variable[1]);
};

I was forgetting about IE :) It could not be that easier... Well I did not mention that document.currentScript is a HTML5 property. It has not been included for different versions of IE (I tested until IE11, and it was not there yet). For IE compatibility, I added this portion to the code:

document.currentScript = document.currentScript || (function() {
  var scripts = document.getElementsByTagName('script');
  return scripts[scripts.length - 1];
})();

What we are doing here is to define some alternative code for IE, which returns the current script object, which is required in the solution to extract parameters from the src property. This is not the perfect solution for IE since there are some limitations; If the script is loaded asynchronously. Newer browsers should include ".currentScript" property.

I hope it helps.

2

Put the values you need someplace where the other script can retrieve them, like a hidden input, and then pull those values from their container when you initialize your new script. You could even put all your params as a JSON string into one hidden field.

  • Thanks for answering. The params are actually input by the users (who embeds this script tag in their code). What then? – Tomer Lichtash Mar 13 '11 at 21:14
  • The only thing I can think of if you don't have control over both client/server scripts is to take the users input and use it to generate a specific .js file with their input embedded in it, and that's assuming you are in control of gathering and processing their input. – bwest Mar 13 '11 at 21:21
  • Doesn't answer original question: where to put the arguments when there is no form to hold the Hidden field? – David Spector Oct 9 '18 at 12:39
-1

Create an attribute that contains a list of the parameters, like so:

<script src="http://path/to/widget.js" data-params="1, 3"></script>

Then, in your JavaScript, get the parameters as an array:

var script = document.currentScript || 
/*Polyfill*/ Array.prototype.slice.call(document.getElementsByTagName('script')).pop();

var params = (script.getAttribute('data-params') || '').split(/, */);

params[0]; // -> 1
params[1]; // -> 3

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