15

Can someone give me some suggestions about my project structure, please?

-app
  -layout
     -home-layout
         -header
         -menu
         -content
            -detail-page
               -left-side
                  -left-side.component.html
                  -left-side.component.ts
               -right-side
             -detail-page.component.html
             -detail-page.component.ts
         -footer
     -pipes
     -widget-features
  -material-module
  -services
  -models

With the actual structure, the site map organization is very clear, I can easily find the different pages content.

But to get a modular architecture, I want to reorganize the structure.

Can you give me some advises, please?

22

Remember there isn't any magic bullet for this or a general recipe which fits for all projects.

That said, you could use the official Angular Style Guide, which tries to follow the Folders-by-feature structure.

Regarding the Application structure, you have to keep in mind being LIFT:

Do structure the app such that you can Locate code quickly, Identify the code at a glance, keep the Flattest structure you can, and Try to be DRY

  • Locate

Do make locating code intuitive, simple and fast.

  • Identify

Do name the file such that you instantly know what it contains and represents.

Do be descriptive with file names and keep the contents of the file to exactly one component.

Avoid files with multiple components, multiple services, or a mixture.

  • Flat

Do keep a flat folder structure as long as possible.

Consider creating sub-folders when a folder reaches seven or more files.

Consider configuring the IDE to hide distracting, irrelevant files such as generated .js and .js.map files.

  • Try to be DRY

Do be DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself).

Avoid being so DRY that you sacrifice readability.


According to the structure you have shown, one thing might be worth reviewing is the level of folders nesting following the principle "Do keep a flat folder structure as long as possible".

This means you should keep the structure as flat as possible, this makes possible to locate the files faster. But this is not a must rule, but a should one. So, if making the structure flatter doesn't affect the logical organization you have currently, you probably should make it flatter (otherwise you should not).

Remember this aims to improve the development process. If something is not improving your team organization/productivity, etc, then don't use it, if it helps, use it.

| improve this answer | |
  • Flat folder is better? so i should put the page component like detail into another foloder. – pierre Oct 23 '18 at 14:51
  • @pierre you should keep the structure as flat as possible, this make possible to locate the files faster. But this is not a must rule, but a should one. It means, if making the structure more flat doesn't affect the logical organization you have, you probably should make it more flat (otherwise you should not). Remember this aims to improve the development process. If you see something is not improving you team organization/productivity, etc, then don't use it, if it helps, use ti then :) – lealceldeiro Oct 23 '18 at 14:58
8

The architecture that the Angular Style Guide leans towards is known as a 'feature module' architecture, where features are encapsulated within Angular modules (TypeScript classes with an @ngModule decorator).

To get a feel for it, try running some generate commands using the Angular CLI.

For example, to create a feature module containing some encapsulated components/services, run these commands in sequence:

ng g m my-awesome-feature
ng g c my-awesome-feature/cool-component
ng g s my-awesome-feature/fancy-service

The CLI will create a nice module architecture for you, and even automatically declare your components in the module files!

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { CommonModule } from '@angular/common';
import { CoolComponentComponent } from './cool-component/cool-component.component';

@NgModule({
  imports: [
    CommonModule
  ],
  declarations: [CoolComponentComponent]
})
export class MyAwesomeFeatureModule { }
| improve this answer | |
1

I always follow a similar structure, that combines the best of url-based structure and modular architecture, in my opinion. It's something like this:

  • app
    • _models
    • _services
    • _shared
      • shared components
      • shared modules
    • home
    • whatever page
      • whatever's specific components

Basically, in "_shared" you would put all the components and modules shared among different pages, such as a footer or the Material modules. You must declare them or import them in the _shared module, as well as export them.

I'm assuming that all the services are shared and provided in the app module, but of course you could put them in the _shared module or in any other child's module.

By the way, I name them with an actual underscore so that they bubble up in the explorer. It's handy to know they're always gonna be up there.

| improve this answer | |
  • I have many enums and models, so should i mix the similar class or enums into a single file? – pierre Oct 23 '18 at 14:53
  • @pierre I wouldn't do that! – lealceldeiro Oct 23 '18 at 14:54
  • So you put all the html into the shared component with the .ts or you put them into the home foloder? – pierre Oct 23 '18 at 14:55
  • I consider a component a set of three files: ts, html and css. Each component is in its own folder holding those three files. The only separate html file should be, in my opinion, the only one that doesn't belong to a component (index.html) – RTYX Oct 24 '18 at 16:22
0

I like the structure recommended at this article [Angular folder structure] https://medium.com/@motcowley/angular-folder-structure-d1809be95542, but with some modifications we, at my company, ended up with the below:

-app
  
 -shared

     -services

     -pipes

     -components

      -models


-modules

  -users
    -components
        -list
        -edit
    -models
        -users.model.ts
    -services
        -user-service.ts

    users.component.ts
    users.component.html
    users.component.module.ts
    users.component.module.ts
    users.component.route.ts

  -organisations
    -components
        -list
        -manage
    -models
        organisation.model.ts
    -services
        organisation.service.ts
        
    organisations.component.ts
    organisations.component.html
    organisations.component.module.ts
    organisations.component.module.ts
    organisations.component.route.ts

-app.component.ts
-app.component.html
-app.module.ts
-app-routing.module.ts

This also gives a kind of micro-service architecture where each module/feature having its own services/dependencies.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.