48

Test code in below and I put the output info in comment. I was using gcc 4.8.5 and Centos 7.2.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>

class C 
{
    public:
        void foo() {
            printf("%p, %p\n", &C::c, &(C::c)); // output value is 0x4, 0x7ffc2e7f52e8
            std::cout << &C::c << std::endl;    // output value is 1
        }
        int a;
        int c;
};

int main(void)
{
    C co;

    printf("%p\n", &C::c);              // output value is 0x4
    std::cout << &C::c << std::endl;    // output value is 1

//    printf("%p\n", &(C::c));   // compile error, invalid use of non-static data member 'C::c'

    co.foo();

    return 0;
}
  1. According to C++ operator Precedence,the :: operator has higher precedence than the & operator. I think &C::c is equal to &(C::c), but the output says otherwise. Why are they different?
  2. &(C::c) causes a compile error in main but not in the foo function,why is that?
  3. The value of &C::c is different in printf and std::cout, why is that?
2
  • You cannot printf a pointer to member value. %p is for regular pointers only.
    – n. m.
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:15
  • 14
    @n.m. Even worse, %p is for void * only.
    – melpomene
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:17

4 Answers 4

47

C++ distinguishes two forms of operands to the & operator, lvalues in general and (qualified) identifiers specifically. In &C::c the operand of & is a qualified identifier (i.e. just a name) whereas in &(C::c) the operand is a general expression (because ( cannot be part of a name).

The qualified identifier form has a special case: If it refers to a non-static member of a class (like your C::c), & returns a special value known as a "pointer to member of C". See here for more information about member pointers.

In &(C::c) there is no special case. C::c is resolved normally and fails because there is no object to get a c member of. At least that's what happens in main; in methods of C (like your foo) there is an implicit this object, so C::c actually means this->c there.

As for why the output is different for printf vs. cout: When you try to print a member pointer with <<, it is implicitly converted to a bool, yielding false if it's a null pointer and true otherwise. false is printed as 0; true is printed as 1. Your member pointer is not null, so you get 1. This is different from normal pointers, which are implicitly converted to void * and printed as addresses, but member pointers cannot be converted to void * so the only applicable overload of operator<< is the one for bool. See https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io/basic_ostream/operator_ltlt#Notes.

Note that technically your printf calls have undefined behavior. %p takes a void * and you're passing it pointers of different types. In normal function calls the automatic conversion from T * to void * would kick in, but printf is a variable-arguments function that provides no type context to its argument list, so you need a manual conversion:

printf("%p\n", static_cast<void *>(&(C::c)));

The relevant part of the standard is [expr.unary.op], saying:

The result of the unary & operator is a pointer to its operand. The operand shall be an lvalue or a qualified-id. If the operand is a qualified-id naming a non-static or variant member m of some class C with type T, the result has type “pointer to member of class C of type T” and is a prvalue designating C​::​m. Otherwise, if the type of the expression is T, the result has type “pointer to T” [...]

6
  • @M.M Not if you do it in foo. See the rest of my answer.
    – melpomene
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:28
  • ”try to print a pointer with <<,it's implicitly converted to a bool"。 I try int b = 1; std::cout << &b << std::endl;, it output an address not just 1.
    – randomeval
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:29
  • @M.M The one in main is commented out ... or at least it was before you edited OP's code. Now it no longer matches the question. Sigh.
    – melpomene
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:42
  • @M.M That's the second question. The first question is why the output is different for &C::c vs &(C::c). (The third question is why the output is different for printf vs cout.)
    – melpomene
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:47
  • Let us continue this discussion in chat.
    – melpomene
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:48
4

While the expression &C::c result in a pointer to member c the expression &(C::c) yield the address of the member variable c. The difference you're seeing in the output is that std::cout involve a bool implicit conversion that tells you whether the pointer is null or not.

Since &C::c is actually not null is implicitly converted to bool with value true or 1

1

Q1: There is special meaning to the syntax of & followed by an unparenthesized qualified-id. It means to form a pointer-to-member. Furthermore, there is no other way to form a pointer-to-member. This is covered by C++17 [expr.unary.op]/4:

A pointer to member is only formed when an explicit & is used and its operand is a qualified-id not enclosed in parentheses. [Note: That is, the expression &(qualified-id) , where the qualified-id is enclosed in parentheses, does not form an expression of type “pointer to member”. Neither does qualified-id [...]


Q3: In both cases where you write printf("%p\n", &C::c);, &C::c is a pointer-to-member. The %p format specifier is only for void * so this causes undefined behaviour, and the program output is meaningless.

The code cout << &C::c; outputs a pointer-to-member via operator<<(bool val), since there is implicit conversion from pointer-to-member to bool (with result true in all cases), see [conv.bool]/1.

For further discussion of how to print a pointer-to-member, see this answer.


Q2: The code &(C::c) does not form a pointer-to-member as explained above.

Now, the code C::c is in the grammatical category id-expression. (Which is qualified-id and unqualified-id). An id-expression has some restrictions on its use, [expr.prim.id]/1:

An id-expression that denotes a non-static data member or non-static member function of a class can only be used:

  • as part of a class member access in which the object expression refers to the member’s class or a class derived from that class, or
  • to form a pointer to member (7.6.2.1), or
  • if that id-expression denotes a non-static data member and it appears in an unevaluated operand.

When we are inside the C::foo function, the first of those bullet points applies. The code is the same as &c but with unnecessary qualification. This has type int *. You could output this with std::cout << &(C::c); which would show a memory address, the address of this->c.

When we are in the main function , none of the three bullet points apply and therefore the &(C::c) is ill-formed.

2
  • Re this situation seems to be intended as "otherwise indicated": The n4659 draft explicitly says so in the section about unary operators, 8.3.1/4: A pointer to member is only formed when an explicit & is used and its operand is a qualified-id not enclosed in parentheses. [Note: That is, the expression &(qualified-id), where the qualified-id is enclosed in parentheses, does not form an expression of type “pointer to member”. ...] Oct 23, 2018 at 13:44
  • @PeterA.Schneider thanks, I overlooked that paragraph. Updated now
    – M.M
    Oct 24, 2018 at 0:19
0

First, you can not access the int c by using &(C::c) outside a class. &(C::c) means the memory address of "c of instance C", somewhat &(this->c) here. However your c is not a static member of class C and there is no C instance. You can not access int x = C::c outside, either.

So you see an error with:

//    printf("%p\n", &(C::c));   // compile error, invalid use of non-static data member 'C::c'

If you have a static int c, then C::c outside the class is OK, because no instance is needed here.

And let's run

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>

class C
{
    public:
        void foo() {
            printf("%p, %p, this=%p\n", &C::c, &(C::c), this);
        }
        int a;
        int c;
};

int main(void)
{
    C co;
    co.foo();
    return 0;
}

The output is:

0x4, 0x7ffee78e47f4, this=0x7ffee78e47f0
// 0x4 + this == 0x7ffee78e47f4
// see reference

And for std::out: the << &C::c is implicit-casted to bool, so true is 1 you saw. You can treat &C::c as an offset of c in C, it is unusable without a C instance.

That's all.

Some reference: C++: Pointer to class data member "::*"

Full description: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/pointer

1
  • In C::c, the C can only be a class or namespace name (never an instance)
    – M.M
    Oct 23, 2018 at 3:36

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