716

So I can start from len(collection) and end in collection[0].

I also want to be able to access the loop index.

26 Answers 26

1207
1

Use the built-in reversed() function:

>>> a = ["foo", "bar", "baz"]
>>> for i in reversed(a):
...     print(i)
... 
baz
bar
foo

To also access the original index, use enumerate() on your list before passing it to reversed():

>>> for i, e in reversed(list(enumerate(a))):
...     print(i, e)
... 
2 baz
1 bar
0 foo

Since enumerate() returns a generator and generators can't be reversed, you need to convert it to a list first.

| improve this answer | |
  • 131
    No copy is created, the elements are reversed on the fly while traversing! This is an important feature of all these iteration functions (which all end on “ed”). – Konrad Rudolph Feb 9 '09 at 19:10
  • 9
    @Greg Hewgill No, it's an iterator over the original, no copy is created! – André Feb 9 '09 at 19:14
  • 93
    To avoid the confusion: reversed() doesn't modify the list. reversed() doesn't make a copy of the list (otherwise it would require O(N) additional memory). If you need to modify the list use alist.reverse(); if you need a copy of the list in reversed order use alist[::-1]. – jfs Feb 9 '09 at 19:27
  • 93
    in this answer though, list(enumerate(a)) DOES create a copy. – Triptych Feb 9 '09 at 19:29
  • 44
    @ JF, reversed() doesn't make a copy, but list(enumerate()) DOES make a copy. – Triptych Feb 9 '09 at 19:55
174
1

You can do:

for item in my_list[::-1]:
    print item

(Or whatever you want to do in the for loop.)

The [::-1] slice reverses the list in the for loop (but won't actually modify your list "permanently").

| improve this answer | |
  • 25
    [::-1] creates a shallow copy, therefore it doesn't change the array neither "permanently" nor "temporary". – jfs Feb 9 '09 at 19:15
  • 6
    This is slightly slower than using reversed, at least under Python 2.7 (tested). – kgriffs Jan 2 '14 at 16:49
  • 14
    How this answer works: it creates a sliced copy of the list with the parameters: start point: unspecified (becomes length of list so starts at end), end point: unspecified (becomes some magic number other than 0, probably -1, so ends at start) and step: -1 (iterates backwards through list, 1 item at a time). – Edward May 16 '16 at 15:21
  • 1
    I tested this as well (python 2.7) and it was ~10% slower to use [::-1] vs reversed() – RustyShackleford Jul 25 '17 at 22:10
67
0

If you need the loop index, and don't want to traverse the entire list twice, or use extra memory, I'd write a generator.

def reverse_enum(L):
   for index in reversed(xrange(len(L))):
      yield index, L[index]

L = ['foo', 'bar', 'bas']
for index, item in reverse_enum(L):
   print index, item
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I would call the function enumerate_reversed, but that might be only my taste. I believe your answer is the cleanest for the specific question. – tzot Feb 9 '09 at 20:58
  • 1
    reversed(xrange(len(L))) produces the same indices as xrange(len(L)-1, -1, -1). – jfs Feb 10 '09 at 16:52
  • 2
    I prefer fewer moving parts to understand: for index, item in enumerate(reversed(L)): print len(L)-1-index, item – Don Kirkby Nov 5 '14 at 21:56
  • 2
    @Triptych I just had to cope with fact that enumerate from reversed() won't yield reversed indexes, and your code helped a lot. This method should be in the standard library. – oski86 Jul 21 '15 at 18:57
  • 2
    reversed(xrange()) works because an xrange object has the __reversed__ method as well as the __len__ and __getitem__ methods, and reversed can detect that and use them. But an enumerate object doesn't have __reversed__, __len__ or __getitem__. But why doesn't enumerate have them? I don't know that. – FutureNerd Sep 24 '15 at 1:01
61
0

It can be done like this:

for i in range(len(collection)-1, -1, -1):
    print collection[i]

    # print(collection[i]) for python 3. +

So your guess was pretty close :) A little awkward but it's basically saying: start with 1 less than len(collection), keep going until you get to just before -1, by steps of -1.

Fyi, the help function is very useful as it lets you view the docs for something from the Python console, eg:

help(range)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    For versions of Python prior to 3.0, I believe xrange is preferable to range for large len(collection). – Brian M. Hunt Feb 9 '09 at 23:26
  • I believe you are correct :) iirc, range() generates the whole range as an array but xrange() returns an iterator that only generates the values as they are needed. – Alan Rowarth Feb 9 '09 at 23:57
  • 12
    This just looks too weird with so many -1's. I would just say reversed(xrange(len(collection))) – musiphil Sep 7 '13 at 1:18
22
0

The reversed builtin function is handy:

for item in reversed(sequence):

The documentation for reversed explains its limitations.

For the cases where I have to walk a sequence in reverse along with the index (e.g. for in-place modifications changing the sequence length), I have this function defined an my codeutil module:

import itertools
def reversed_enumerate(sequence):
    return itertools.izip(
        reversed(xrange(len(sequence))),
        reversed(sequence),
    )

This one avoids creating a copy of the sequence. Obviously, the reversed limitations still apply.

| improve this answer | |
9
0

How about without recreating a new list, you can do by indexing:

>>> foo = ['1a','2b','3c','4d']
>>> for i in range(len(foo)):
...     print foo[-(i+1)]
...
4d
3c
2b
1a
>>>

OR

>>> length = len(foo)
>>> for i in range(length):
...     print foo[length-i-1]
...
4d
3c
2b
1a
>>>
| improve this answer | |
9
0
>>> l = ["a","b","c","d"]
>>> l.reverse()
>>> l
['d', 'c', 'b', 'a']

OR

>>> print l[::-1]
['d', 'c', 'b', 'a']
| improve this answer | |
7
0

I like the one-liner generator approach:

((i, sequence[i]) for i in reversed(xrange(len(sequence))))
| improve this answer | |
7
0

Also, you could use either "range" or "count" functions. As follows:

a = ["foo", "bar", "baz"]
for i in range(len(a)-1, -1, -1):
    print(i, a[i])

3 baz
2 bar
1 foo

You could also use "count" from itertools as following:

a = ["foo", "bar", "baz"]
from itertools import count, takewhile

def larger_than_0(x):
    return x > 0

for x in takewhile(larger_than_0, count(3, -1)):
    print(x, a[x-1])

3 baz
2 bar
1 foo
| improve this answer | |
  • The code in your first block there doesn't produce the right output; the output is actually 3 foo\n2 bar\n1 baz – amiller27 Jun 22 '18 at 5:49
  • To avoid using "a[i-1]" in first example, use this range "range(len(a)-1, -1, -1)". This is more simplified. – Francisc Dec 23 '18 at 22:48
7
0

An approach with no imports:

for i in range(1,len(arr)+1):
    print(arr[-i])

or

for i in arr[::-1]:
    print(i)
| improve this answer | |
4
0

Use list.reverse() and then iterate as you normally would.

http://docs.python.org/tutorial/datastructures.html

| improve this answer | |
3
0
def reverse(spam):
    k = []
    for i in spam:
        k.insert(0,i)
    return "".join(k)
| improve this answer | |
3
0

for what ever it's worth you can do it like this too. very simple.

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
for x in xrange(len(a)):
    x += 1
    print a[-x]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You can also do print a[-(x+1)] and avoid reassigning the index in the body of the loop. – Malcolm Nov 26 '17 at 3:22
2
0

An expressive way to achieve reverse(enumerate(collection)) in python 3:

zip(reversed(range(len(collection))), reversed(collection))

in python 2:

izip(reversed(xrange(len(collection))), reversed(collection))

I'm not sure why we don't have a shorthand for this, eg.:

def reversed_enumerate(collection):
    return zip(reversed(range(len(collection))), reversed(collection))

or why we don't have reversed_range()

| improve this answer | |
2
0

If you need the index and your list is small, the most readable way is to do reversed(list(enumerate(your_list))) like the accepted answer says. But this creates a copy of your list, so if your list is taking up a large portion of your memory you'll have to subtract the index returned by enumerate(reversed()) from len()-1.

If you just need to do it once:

a = ['b', 'd', 'c', 'a']

for index, value in enumerate(reversed(a)):
    index = len(a)-1 - index

    do_something(index, value)

or if you need to do this multiple times you should use a generator:

def enumerate_reversed(lyst):
    for index, value in enumerate(reversed(lyst)):
        index = len(lyst)-1 - index
        yield index, value

for index, value in enumerate_reversed(a):
    do_something(index, value)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

the reverse function comes in handy here:

myArray = [1,2,3,4]
myArray.reverse()
for x in myArray:
    print x
| improve this answer | |
  • list.reverse() has no return value – Georg Schölly Feb 9 '09 at 19:09
1
0

You can also use a while loop:

i = len(collection)-1
while i>=0:
    value = collection[i]
    index = i
    i-=1
| improve this answer | |
1
0

You can use a negative index in an ordinary for loop:

>>> collection = ["ham", "spam", "eggs", "baked beans"]
>>> for i in range(1, len(collection) + 1):
...     print(collection[-i])
... 
baked beans
eggs
spam
ham

To access the index as though you were iterating forward over a reversed copy of the collection, use i - 1:

>>> for i in range(1, len(collection) + 1):
...     print(i-1, collection[-i])
... 
0 baked beans
1 eggs
2 spam
3 ham

To access the original, un-reversed index, use len(collection) - i:

>>> for i in range(1, len(collection) + 1):
...     print(len(collection)-i, collection[-i])
... 
3 baked beans
2 eggs
1 spam
0 ham
| improve this answer | |
1
0

If you don't mind the index being negative, you can do:

>>> a = ["foo", "bar", "baz"]
>>> for i in range(len(a)):
...     print(~i, a[~i]))
-1 baz
-2 bar
-3 foo
| improve this answer | |
1
0

I think the most elegant way is to transform enumerate and reversed using the following generator

(-(ri+1), val) for ri, val in enumerate(reversed(foo))

which generates a the reverse of the enumerate iterator

Example:

foo = [1,2,3]
bar = [3,6,9]
[
    bar[i] - val
    for i, val in ((-(ri+1), val) for ri, val in enumerate(reversed(foo)))
]

Result:

[6, 4, 2]
| improve this answer | |
0
0

The other answers are good, but if you want to do as List comprehension style

collection = ['a','b','c']
[item for item in reversed( collection ) ]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Isn't this just the same as reversed(collection)? Adding the list comprehension does nothing, except unnecessary computation. It is like writing a = [item for item in [1, 2, 3]] vs a = [1, 2, 3]. – EpicDavi Jun 21 '17 at 20:26
0
0

To use negative indices: start at -1 and step back by -1 at each iteration.

>>> a = ["foo", "bar", "baz"]
>>> for i in range(-1, -1*(len(a)+1), -1):
...     print i, a[i]
... 
-1 baz
-2 bar
-3 foo
| improve this answer | |
0
0

A simple way :

n = int(input())
arr = list(map(int, input().split()))

for i in reversed(range(0, n)):
    print("%d %d" %(i, arr[i]))
| improve this answer | |
0
0
input_list = ['foo','bar','baz']
for i in range(-1,-len(input_list)-1,-1)
    print(input_list[i])

i think this one is also simple way to do it... read from end and keep decrementing till the length of list, since we never execute the "end" index hence added -1 also

| improve this answer | |
0
0

Assuming task is to find last element that satisfies some condition in a list (i.e. first when looking backwards), I'm getting following numbers:

>>> min(timeit.repeat('for i in xrange(len(xs)-1,-1,-1):\n    if 128 == xs[i]: break', setup='xs, n = range(256), 0', repeat=8))
4.6937971115112305
>>> min(timeit.repeat('for i in reversed(xrange(0, len(xs))):\n    if 128 == xs[i]: break', setup='xs, n = range(256), 0', repeat=8))
4.809093952178955
>>> min(timeit.repeat('for i, x in enumerate(reversed(xs), 1):\n    if 128 == x: break', setup='xs, n = range(256), 0', repeat=8))
4.931743860244751
>>> min(timeit.repeat('for i, x in enumerate(xs[::-1]):\n    if 128 == x: break', setup='xs, n = range(256), 0', repeat=8))
5.548468112945557
>>> min(timeit.repeat('for i in xrange(len(xs), 0, -1):\n    if 128 == xs[i - 1]: break', setup='xs, n = range(256), 0', repeat=8))
6.286104917526245
>>> min(timeit.repeat('i = len(xs)\nwhile 0 < i:\n    i -= 1\n    if 128 == xs[i]: break', setup='xs, n = range(256), 0', repeat=8))
8.384078979492188

So, the ugliest option xrange(len(xs)-1,-1,-1) is the fastest.

| improve this answer | |
-1
0

you can use a generator:

li = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
len_li = len(li)
gen = (len_li-1-i for i in range(len_li))

finally:

for i in gen:
    print(li[i])

hope this help you.

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.