0

i try do the script:

#!/bin/bash
cat test.txt
echo "Write del if you want delete or write save if you want save"
read s1
echo "Which symbol"
read s2
if [ $s1 = "del" ]
then
sed -i "/^$s2/d"
cat test.txt
if [ $s1 = "save" ]
then
echo "saved"
else
echo "Error"
fi cat test.txt

and i have error in - Syntax error: word unexpected ( expecting "fi" ) Help please!

4
  • 4
    Paste your script at shellcheck.net to check syntax errors. Oct 23 '18 at 13:03
  • 4
    You've got two if but only one fi, bash expects one fi for each if you open ; since both your conditions are exclusive (one can't be true if the other is), consider using elif instead of your second if, which would also solve the problem.
    – Aaron
    Oct 23 '18 at 13:03
  • In the statement if [ $s1 = "del" ], you've got the quotes exactly wrong. Stylistically, you should probably quote both arguments (if [ "$1" = "del" ] (although I've never understood why the stylistic argument for quotes doesn't have you write if "[" "$1" "=" "del" "]";), but if you're going to be sparse with quotes, they are not necessary around del but are required around $1. IOW, you should change it to if [ "$1" = del ] Oct 23 '18 at 13:29
  • 1
    I vote to close this question as it is based on a simple syntax error.
    – kvantour
    Oct 23 '18 at 14:05
4

Indenting code inside of an if block or loops can help catch issues like this. Every if needs a fi to end the block. Indenting your code:

#!/bin/bash
cat test.txt
echo "Write del if you want delete or write save if you want save"
read s1
echo "Which symbol"
read s2

if [ $s1 = "del" ]
then
    sed -i "/^$s2/d"
    cat test.txt

    if [ $s1 = "save" ]
    then
        echo "saved"
    else
        echo "Error"
    fi cat test.txt

You can see that the initial block is not closed with it's own fi. Also you have an oddball cat hanging out on the same line as your fi. That's not supposed to be there. Instead something like:

#!/bin/bash
cat test.txt
echo "Write del if you want delete or write save if you want save"
read s1
echo "Which symbol"
read s2

if [ $s1 = "del" ]
then
    sed -i "/^$s2/d"
    cat test.txt

    if [ $s1 = "save" ]
    then
        echo "saved"
    else
        echo "Error"
    fi 
    cat test.txt
fi

There's no guarantee that is going to do what you want, but it's syntactically correct.

I would HIGHLY suggest dumping this into shellcheck.net so it can point you in the right direction. Specifically the lack of double quotes in your tests that could cause some oddball behavior.


Based on @Aaron's comment you are probably looking for something like the following:

#!/bin/bash
cat test.txt
echo "Write del if you want delete or write save if you want save"
read s1
echo "Which symbol"
read s2

if [ "$s1" = "del" ]; then
    sed -i "/^$s2/d" test.txt    
elif [ "$s1" = "save" ]; then
    echo "saved"
else
    echo "Error"
fi 

cat test.txt
2
  • $s1 can't be both del and save, I'm guessing OP wanted to use an elif there.
    – Aaron
    Oct 23 '18 at 13:12
  • @Aaron Totally agree. I added an edited version of the script at the bottom that I think might be what OP is after.
    – JNevill
    Oct 23 '18 at 13:17
2

There are several issues.

First, you must replace following lines:

sed -i "/^$s2/d"
cat test.txt

by

sed -i "/^$s2/d" test.txt

I guess you didn't want to have 2 if/then instructions, but an elsif one, so you should fix your script like this:

then
sed -i "/^$s2/d" test.txt
elif [ $s1 = "save" ]
then
echo "saved"

In addition, as improvements, I would recommend:

  • to put the name of the file in a dedicated variable, for better legibility and maintenability
  • to touch the file at the beginning of the script, to ensure it exists (even if empty)

Eventually, the script would look like this:

#!/bin/bash

filePath="test.txt"

[ ! -f "$filePath" ] && echo -e "ERROR: file $filePath not found. It is required for this script to work properly" >&2 && exit 1

cat "$filePath"
echo "Write del if you want delete or write save if you want save"
read s1
echo "Which symbol"
read s2

if [ "$s1" = "del" ]; then
  sed -i "/^$s2/d" "$filePath"
elif [ "$s1" = "save" ]; then
  echo "saved"
else
  echo "Error"
fi

cat "$filePath"

You can see that s1 is quoted in the 'if' to avoid issue if there are space characters.

3
  • 1
    Great answer overall, but I'm not too sure about the touch suggestion : in many case I'd rather have the script fail with an error (sed complaining it can't find the file) than act as if everything is alright while it certainly didn't do what I expected it to. Maybe using set -e to avoid running farther than the first error would help avoiding a batch of ugly errors the user might not bother understanding
    – Aaron
    Oct 23 '18 at 13:16
  • 2
    I agree, if the file is required for the script, you should replace the touch solution, by this one: [ ! -f "$filePath" ] && echo -e "ERROR: file $filePath not found. It is required for this script to work properly" >&2 && exit 1 I edited my initial answer accordingly. Oct 23 '18 at 13:19
  • Yeah a guard condition with a not too frightening error is even better :)
    – Aaron
    Oct 23 '18 at 13:21

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