2

I've got a log file that looks like this:

2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Sent 8/8 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Receiving 8 bytes
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Handling TRL request #0001: [GET_REGION_INFO].
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Sent 8/8 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Finished processing TRL request #0001.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 GET_REGION_INFO: Staging 99 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Sent 99/99 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Sent 8/8 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Receiving 8 bytes
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.

Based on the line containing [GET_REGION_INFO], I want to delete all lines near it with the same request id (*36 in this case) ..say within 10 lines in either direction.

What I've got so far is this...it works from the scanned line on...Problem being I don't even think this basic approach is going to work at all to get the matching lines above it. (They've already been printed for one thing)

perl -lane '$requestId=$F[4] if /\[GET_REGION_INFO\]/;$requestId="Z" if $requestId ne $F[4]; print if $requestId eq "Z";' error.log

The only approaches I can think of seem error-prone, and overly complicated. This file is about a gigabyte, so slurping the whole thing is something I'd like to avoid...although the machine has 32GB, so....

Can anyone suggest a reasonably straightforward approach to this? I'm fine with an actual perl script vs. a one-liner.

I should note that the *36 is a request id (as the variable indicates), and theoretically multiple requests can be intermingled. But this is rare so it's ok if the script fails to delete non-consecutive lines (such as my current script).

Oh, one last thing..request ids are eventually recycled, so I can't do anything clever like build up a list of them and then parse the whole file with that list.

And expected output, given the sample input:

2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Sent 8/8 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Receiving 8 bytes
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
6

The problem: There is a certain phrase that happens on some of the lines with a certain request-id. Any lines for that request-id that are within a given distance from the one with the phrase should be skipped, as well as that line itself.

We don't know for which request-id this happens, what also may change through the file.

First read until the phrase shows up, saving lines in a buffer. Once we parse the request-id from that line we know which one it is. Then process the accumulated buffer, printing all lines for other request-id's and only those further than the skip-distance for the "chosen" one.

Then keep collecting lines into the buffer until the phrase is found again. Process the buffer: print all lines for other id's, and only those which are far enough from both phrases for the chosen id.

The code below was tested using variations of posted data. It accounts for possible mixing of lines with different request-id's; dropping that, so assuming that lines with any request-id are always in a block, would simplify the code a lot, and speed it up.

use warnings;
use strict;
use feature 'say';

my ($file, $skip_dist) = @ARGV;
die "Usage: $0 log-file [skip-distance]\n" if not $file;    
$skip_dist //= 2;  #/

my $trigger = qr{\[GET_REGION_INFO\]};

open my $fh, '<', $file  or die "Can't open $file: $!";

my (@buf, $req_mark, $skip_idx, $next_req_cnt);

while (<$fh>) {    
    if (not $req_mark and /$trigger/) {
        # Find the req_id of interest and save it into req_mark,
        # then process the accumulated buffer
        my ($req_id, $msg) = /:\s+(\*[0-9]+)\s+(.*)/;
        $req_mark = $req_id;

        # Find position of req_id which is skip_dist before the mark
        # and print lines for req_mark before it (and all others)
        my $del_idx = find_skip_start($req_mark, \@buf, $skip_dist);
        for my $i (0..$#buf) {
            if ($skip_idx and $i < $skip_idx) { print $buf[$i] }
            else {
                my ($req_id) = $buf[$i] =~ /:\s+(\*[0-9]+)/;
                print $buf[$i] if $req_id ne $req_mark;
            }
        }
        @buf = (); 
        $skip_idx = 0;
    }
    elsif (/$trigger/ or eof) { 
        # Process buffer collected between previous and this trigger,
        # Or up to the end of file (the last line then need be added)
        push @buf, $_  if eof;
        my $skip_idx = (not eof) 
            ? find_skip_start($req_mark, \@buf, $skip_dist) 
            : $#buf+1;
        for my $i (0..$#buf) { 
            my ($req_id) = $buf[$i] =~ /:\s+(\*[0-9]+)/;
            print $buf[$i]
                if  $req_id ne $req_mark
                or (++$next_req_cnt > $skip_dist and $i < $skip_idx);
        }
        @buf = (); 
        $next_req_cnt = $skip_idx = 0;

        # Check whether the request-id changed and update for next buffer
        my ($req_id) = /:\s+(\*[0-9]+)/;
        if ($req_id ne $req_mark) {
            $req_mark = $req_id 
        }

    }   
    else { push @buf, $_ }
}

sub find_skip_start {
    my ($req_mark, $buf, $skip_dist) = @_;
    my ($skip_idx, $prev_req_cnt);
    for my $i (0..$#$buf) {
        my ($req_id) = $buf->[$#$buf-$i] =~ /:\s+(\*[0-9]+)/;
        if ( $req_id eq $req_mark    and
            (++$prev_req_cnt >= $skip_dist) )
        {
            $skip_idx = $#$buf-$i;
            last;
        }
    }
    return $skip_idx;
}

There are a number of places where efficiency can be improved.

A major efficiency question concerns the central issue of the buffer size. How much data can get collected until we hit a trigger? What if there are just a few [GET_..] lines in a file, and we end up accumulating gigabyte(s) of data? Then it'd be better to lighten (print some of) the buffer from time to time; but if there is never much data then the partial buffer emptying badly complicates matters since the phrase may be close ahead (how many lines still to keep?).

This can't be answered without knowing the frequency of that phrase, and the frequency of the request-id's as well. Then one optimization would be to first peek a little into the file and estimate those frequencies, and make decisions on that. However, this isn't too reliable as there is no guarantee for the log file to be consistent in any sense.

The code above clearly assumes that there'll never be too much data and so we won't cause trouble, but it'd be prudent to add a check and write out a part of the buffer if it gets too big.


For the record, when I run the above program on the OP sample data, the output is

2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Sent 8/8 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 GET_REGION_INFO: Staging 99 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Sent 99/99 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:33 [debug] 8851#0: *36 Sent 8/8 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Receiving 8 bytes
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.

In the given sample input the request-id on the line with [GET..] ($req_mark) is *36.

The default number of *36 lines to skip (around the [GET..] line) is set to two (2), for better testing; this can be changed at invocation.

There are no *36 lines in the output before the line with [GET...] (rather, where that line was), as there were only two in data and they are duly skipped; and, the first two lines with *36 after the [GET..] line (where that line was) are omitted, then the rest is printed. This is the expected output.

When I supply the skip-distance (setting $skip_dist) of 10 the output is

2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Sent 8/8 bytes.
2018/10/08 17:11:28 [debug] 8851#0: *2 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Receiving 8 bytes
2018/10/08 17:11:38 [debug] 8851#0: *22 Session: Staging 8 bytes in thread buffer.

as expected: There are fewer than 10 lines with *36 both before and after the line with [GET..] in this sample data, so no *36 lines are printed.


Original post (on belief that *36 is the given request id of interest)

Store those *36 lines in a buffer, and while you are in that region test for that phrase. Once you're out of that region check whether the phrase was found and print accordingly

my $trigger     = 'GET_REGION_INFO';
my $region_mark = '*36';

my (@buff, $drop_lines_mark);

while (<$fh>) {
    my ($req_id, $msg) = /.*?:\s*(\*[0-9]+)\s+(.*)/;
    if ($req_id eq $region_mark) {
        push @buff, $_  
        $drop_lines_mark = $#buff  if $msg =~ /$trigger/;
    }
    elsif (@buff) {              # just left region of interest
        if ($drop_lines_mark) { 
            for my $i (0..$#buff) {
                print $buff[$i] 
                    if $i < $drop_lines_mark-10 
                    or $i > $drop_lines_mark+10;
            }
        }
        else { print for @buff }

        $drop_lines_mark = '';
        @buff = ();
        print;      # don't forget the current line
    }
    else { print }
}

Untested code.

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