23

I've recently been working with someone else's code and I realized that this individual has a very different philosophy regarding private variables and method parameters than I do. I generally feel that private variables should only be used in a case when:

  1. The variable needs to be stored for recall later.
  2. The data stored in the variable is used globally in the class.
  3. When the variable needs to be globally manipulated (something decidedly different from the need to read the variable by every class method).
  4. When it will make programming substantially easier. (Admittedly vague, but one has to be in many circumstances to avoid painting oneself into a corner).

(I admit, that many of the above are slightly repetative, but they each seem different enough to merit such treatment... )

It just seems that this is the most efficient means of preventing changing a variable by accident. It also seems like following these standards will allow for the eventual manipulation of external references (if the class is eventually modified), thus leaving you with further options in the future. Is this simply a style issue (like one true bracket or Hungarian naming conventions), or do I have justification in this belief? Is there actually a best practice in this case?

edit
I think this needs to be corrected. I used "globally" above where I actually meant, "globally by instance methods" not "globally accessible by anything, anywhere".

edit2
An example was asked for:

class foo
{
    private $_my_private_variable;

    public function __constructor__()
    {
     }

    public function useFoo( $variable )
    {
        // This is the line I am wondering about,
        // there does not seem to be a need for storing it.
        $this->_my_private_variable = $variable; 
        $this->_doSometing();
    }

    private function _doSomething()
    {

        /*
          do something with $this->_my_private_variable.
        */
        // This is the only place _my_private_variable is used.
        echo $this->_my_private_variable;
    }
}

This is the way I would have done it:

class foo
{

    public function __constructor__()
    {
     }

    public function useFoo( $variable )
    {
        $this->_doSometing( $variable );
    }

    private function _doSomething( $passed_variable )
    {
        /*
          do something with the parameter.
        */
        echo $passed_variable;
    }
}
  • Um, what is he doing then? Requiring object data to be set prior to calling a method, where said data is used only in that method and is relevant for only a single call? If so, yeah - that's dumb. If not, please clarify! – Shog9 Feb 9 '09 at 19:47
  • Well, all of the data is set correctly in some way or another. For example, in one place the information is defined in a constructor, but it could have (just as easily) been passed as a parameter. – cwallenpoole Feb 9 '09 at 20:02
  • His use does not entirely seem nonsensical, but it just seemed like it would be pretty far from best practice. – cwallenpoole Feb 9 '09 at 20:07
  • 1
    Please give concrete examples of the code in question. – Esko Luontola Feb 9 '09 at 20:51
33

In general, class members should represent state of the class object.

They are not temporary locations for method parameters (that's what method parameters are for).

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  • State of a class object -or- a dependency of a class object – nikk wong Oct 29 '16 at 22:49
  • I'd argue that it's fine if it's all private state. Cutting down on some heavily used parameters can make the code much easier to read. – byxor Dec 11 '16 at 3:17
  • @byxor but it also instantly makes your class non-thread-safe – Zoltán May 23 '17 at 16:12
  • Very true. We're very quickly leaving the single-threaded world, so that's a really important point. – byxor May 24 '17 at 10:58
8

I claim that it isn't a style issue but rather a readability/maintainability issue. One variable should have one use, and one use only. “Recycling” variables for different purposes just because they happen to require the same type doesn't make any sense.

From your description it sounds as if the other person's code you worked on does exactly this, since all other uses are basically covered by your list. Put simply, it uses private member variables to act as temporaries depending on situation. Am I right to assume this? If so, the code is horrible.

The smaller the lexical scope and lifetime of any given variable, the less possiblity of erroneous use and the better for resource disposal.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Thank you very much. I thought so. – cwallenpoole Feb 9 '09 at 19:58
  • Liked your last paragraph. But, in terms of performance, doesn't recycling a variable as a temp buffer reduce the cost of alloc/free ? Also, when chaining several method calls, it is more readable to push a value into the object and pop it out at the final call, rather than passing it through all the way as a parameter. Anyway, even if non necessarily the best practice, could you please explain why you think this code is "horrible" ? – yO_ Nov 9 '18 at 10:56
  • @yO_ In PHP, the performance difference due to alloc/free is almost certainly so small that it becomes unmeasurable. Regardless of that, such a tiny micro-optimisation would never justify writing less maintainable code. Method chaining is a very different case: here you’re setting and subsequently operating on the object’s logical state, so using a private member makes perfect sense. The OP was explicitly excluding this scenario. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 9 '18 at 11:24
8

Having a member variable implies that it will be holding state that needs to be held between method calls. If the value doesn't need to live between calls it has no reason to exist outside of the scope of a single call, and thus (if it exists at all) should be a variable within the method itself.

Style is always a hard one, once you develop one you can get stuck in a bit of a rut and it can be difficult to see why what you do may not be the best way.

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4

You should only create variables when and where they are needed, and dispose of them when you are done. If the class doesn't need a class level variable to function, then it just doesn't need one. Creating variables where you don't need them is very bad practice.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Are you encouraging people to inline everything because variables aren't always needed for the code to function? – byxor Dec 11 '16 at 3:19
2

Class members should be any of the following:

  • A dependency of a class
  • A variable that represents the state of the class
  • A method of the class
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0

I'm not sure there is a stated best-practice for using globally scoped variables versus always passing as method parameters. (By "private variables", I'm assuming you mean globally scoped variables.)

Using a globally scoped variable is the only way to implement properties in .NET (even automatic properties ultimately use a globally scoped variable, just not one you have to declare yourself).

There is a line of arguement for always using method parameters because it makes it completely clear where the value is coming from. I don't think it really helps prevent the method from making changes to the underlying value and it can, in my opinion, make things more difficult to read at times.

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0

I would disagree with implementing it for global access or to make programming easier. By exposing these globally without filtering of any kind make it more difficult to determine access in the future.

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0

Since object properties are meant to hold state, as stated by the others, my policy is to have all of them private by default unless I have a good reason to expose them.

It's much easier to make them public later on, if you have to, simply by writing a getter method for example (which i also don't have to think about right at the beginning of writing a class). But reeling in a public property later on may require a huge amount of code to be re-written.

I like to keep it flexible while not having to think about this more than needed.

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