1

This is from chux's answer to the question here: How to get the strings from a file and store in a 2D char array and compare that 2D char array with a string in C?

Lop off the potential tailing '\n'

size_t len = strlen(buf);
  if (len && buf[len-1] == '\n') buf[--len] = '\0';

I understand the second part of the if statement (checking if buf[len-1] == '\n'), but don't think I understand the if (len) part of it... Is it simply checking if there's actually a non-zero length to whatever's in the buffer (and if so, how can a situation where strlen returns 0 arise?) or is it something else?

  • 5
    if (len) is a lazy way of writing if (len != 0). The point of that is that if len is zero, you do not want to mess with buf[len - 1] (because len is an unsigned type, so len - 1 wraps to a huge offset, out of bounds of the array). – Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '18 at 6:14
  • The file could simply be empty (empty string in buffer), then Len-1 would become a really big number (underfloow as Len is unsigned) – MrTux Oct 24 '18 at 6:15
  • @MrTux Had the file been empty, then fgets() would return NULL and the buf[] contents remain unchanged (uninitialized) in that code and strlen(buf) not encountered. – chux - Reinstate Monica Oct 25 '18 at 1:21
2
while (i < 100 && fgets(buf, sizeof buf, f) != NULL ) {
  // Lop off the potential tailing '\n'
  size_t len = strlen(buf);
  if (len && buf[len-1] == '\n') buf[--len] = '\0';

Is it simply checking if there's actually a non-zero length to whatever's in the buffer

Yes.

Code is testing len != 0 before attempting buf[len-1] to prevent accessing buf[] out of range.
@Jonathan Leffler


(and if so, how can a situation where strlen returns 0 arise?)

Defensive coding: The line read may start with a null character.

The prior code has fgets(buf, sizeof buf, f) which reads a line and then forms a string. In the C standard library1, a line of input is the characters up to and including a '\n'. The null character has no special significance on input, it is just like another other character. After a line is read with fgets() and saved in buf[], a null character is appended. size_t len = strlen(buf); return the length based on the first null character, not necessarily the appended one.

If the text file line is

'\0', 'a', 'b', 'c', '\n'

Then fgets(buf, ...) will result in buf[] as

'\0', 'a', 'b', 'c', '\n', '\0'

And len == 0.

ASCII text files uncommonly contain null characters. Their presence is usually a mistake or nefarious (a hacker exploit). Null characters are common in UTF-16 text files, yet reading such a file with the code in question has other troubles too.


1 "A text stream is an ordered sequence of characters composed into lines, each line consisting of zero or more characters plus a terminating new-line character. Whether the last line requires a terminating new-line character is implementation-defined." C11dr §7.21.2 2

2

You can index an array only when something is greater than zero. So to access buff[len-1] len must be greater than zero otherwise if len is zero then len - 1 will be a very large number defined by SIZE_MAX and buff[-1] is an error. The statement if (len && buff[len-1]=='\n') combines two conditions:
First checks for len > 0 and then the buff[len-1] == '\n'.
The above given if statement simply means the following: if( (len > 0) && (buff[len-1] == '\n'))

  • 1
    len is a size_t value (which is an unsigned integer type), so if len is zero, len - 1 will not be -1, but SIZE_MAX. – ex nihilo Oct 24 '18 at 6:30
2

An empty string has 0 length.

The following code will result in len being 0:

const char * str = "";
size_t len = strlen(str);

So we must check it before accessing str[len-1] to avoid an integer wraparound.

Note that the length of the buffer which holds str is 1, because of the trailing '\0', so the memory will look like this:

buf --> [ '\0' ]
  • 2
    It is wraparound rather than, or as much as, underflow because size_t is an unsigned integer type. C11 §6.2.5 Types ¶9: … A computation involving unsigned operands can never overflow, because a result that cannot be represented by the resulting unsigned integer type is reduced modulo the number that is one greater than the largest value that can be represented by the resulting type. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '18 at 6:22
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size_t is the unsigned integer type of the result of sizeof , alignof (since C11) and offsetof, depending on the data model.

I think you are right in terms of checking. size_t is the unsigned integer type, so it is checking that condition in order to proceed with the other check and buf[--len]

https://en.cppreference.com/w/c/types/size_t

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