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When looking into the using statement at msdn it says the following:

When the lifetime of an IDisposable object is limited to a single method, you should declare and instantiate it in the using statement. The using statement calls the Dispose method on the object in the correct way, and (when you use it as shown earlier) it also causes the object itself to go out of scope as soon as Dispose is called. Within the using block, the object is read-only and cannot be modified or reassigned.

Taking into account the information supplied by MSDN. When returning a memorystream from within a using block of which the method has been made static.

Q: Does the memorystream gets disposed when it gets returned or does it closes and lives on as a read only memorystream?

The code beneath is being used for returning a memorystream.

        public static MemoryStream CreatePermitFileMemoryStream(int encOnlineId)
        {
            var folder = @"path\anotherpath\filelocation";
            try
            {
                using (var zipStream = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    using (var fileStream = new FileStream(@"path\anotherpath\filelocation\file.zip", FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
                    {
                        using (var zipArchive = new ZipArchive(fileStream, ZipArchiveMode.Create))
                        {
                            foreach (var fileInfo in Directory.EnumerateFileSystemEntries(folder))
                            {
                                if (fileInfo.Contains("file.tmp") || fileInfo.Contains("PERM.TXT"))
                                {
                                    var filename = new FileInfo(fileInfo);
                                    zipArchive.CreateEntryFromFile(fileInfo, filename.Name);
                                }
                            }
                            fileStream.CopyTo(zipStream);
                            zipStream.Position = 0;
                            return zipStream;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                FileUtils.DeleteFile(@"path\anotherpath\filelocation");
            }

        }
        return new MemoryStream();
    }
4
  • 4
    The using block is exited when you call return. So yes, Dispose will be called on zipStream.
    – marsze
    Oct 24, 2018 at 11:06
  • 7
    you will return a disposed MemoryStream. So accessing it will throw exceptions or return erros.
    – gofal3
    Oct 24, 2018 at 11:07
  • If you really need to return a stream (not a byte array), just don't use a using-block for zipStream.
    – marsze
    Oct 24, 2018 at 11:08
  • I also thought it wouldn't execute. But the code that's supplied works..
    – M.B.
    Oct 24, 2018 at 11:13

3 Answers 3

5

The code may work because Dispose on a MemoryStream doesn't really do anything (the memory is reclaimed by GC), but I certainly wouldn't depend on it always doing so for all .NET implementations - unless the only function you're calling is GetBuffer(), which is guaranteed to work after closing the stream. It's probably safer to remove the 'using' in this case. The "read-only" refers to the inability to re-assign the reference to another object. BTW if you look at https://github.com/dotnet/corefx/blob/master/src/Common/src/CoreLib/System/IO/MemoryStream.cs the comments in Dispose() indicate that the developers deliberately intended for the object buffer to still available after disposing, but there's no guarantee reading from it as a stream will work (and writing will almost certainly fail).

1
  • This answers my question why it works even after exiting the function (with using) and I used it in another function calling ToArray() on it.
    – puerile
    Jan 30, 2022 at 9:22
1

Answer is Yes. Any object that implements IDisposable interface can be used in using block that make sure Dispose() is called at the end of using block. In fact using block acts as try, finally blocks having Dispose() in finally block.

-1

It's okay to return the stream. You can still use the using statement where you consume the stream:

using (var permitFileStream = CreatePermitFileMemoryStream(0))
{
     //Use your stream
}

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