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I want to extract the old fasta names which looks something like this:

>Bartonella bibbi
AUUCCGGUUGAUCCUGCCGGAGGCCACUGCUAUCGGGGUCCG

The new headers should look like this:

>Seq1
AUUCCGGUUGAUCCUGCCGGAGGCCACUGCUAUCGGGGUCCG

and so on... The Bartonella Bibbi should be saved together with the new name Seq1 in a new file an so on. So I've started a bit, by looking for lines with >, and then I split to get an array to get the old name. I don't know how to continue, because I want two things here, first to put the new name in there, but also extracting the old name together with the new in a file, and ALSO get an output file with my sequence and my new names. Please, any input from you will help!

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $infile = $ARGV[0];
open my $IN, '<', $infile or die "Could not open $infile: $!, $?";

while (my $line = <$IN>) {
 if ($line =~ /^>/) {

my @header = split (/\>/, $line);

    my $oldfasta = "$header[1]";

}
}

So after some edits, this is the current script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $infile = $ARGV[0];
open my $IN, '<', $infile or die "Could not open $infile: $!, $?";

my $seqid = 1;
my %id;

while (my $line = <$IN>) {
 if ($line =~ /^>/) {

     $id{"Seq$seqid "} = $line;
     print ">Seq$seqid\n";
     $seqid++
 } else {

     print $line;
 }


}

     my $outfile = 'output';
     open my $OUT, '>', $outfile or die "Could not open $outfile: $!, $?";  # overwrites the file $outfile;
     print $OUT %id;

This gives me a file that looks like this:

   Seq29  >Sulfophobococcus_zilligii

   Seq20 >Pyrococcus_shinkaii

and so on. They are not in order, how do I sort them and get rid of the > in the species name?

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You’re simply not printing anything. Once you add a print statement, it should work.

In addition, it’s unclear what you’re using split for. Just increase a counter for the sequence:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $infile = $ARGV[0];
open my $IN, '<', $infile or die "Could not open $infile: $!, $?";

my $seqid = 1;

while (my $line = <$IN>) {
    if ($line =~ /^>/) {
        print ">Seq$seqid\n";
        $seqid++;
    } else {
        print $line;
    }
}
  • I see. Thank you! So before I replace the headers I should store the old headers somehow in a file, right? That's why I wanted to use split (maybe wrong way to do it), to extract the old name and place them I hashes. – Michelangelo Oct 25 '18 at 11:01
  • @Michelangelo Ah, it wasn’t clear that you want to preserve the old headers. You can do that but you don’t need to use split. Simply remove the leading > by running $line =~ s/^>//; and then storing $line in an array or a hash. If you want to preserve the header in the file and simply prefix it with the sequence ID you can replace '>' by {'>', followed by the sequence ID}. This is left as an exercise to the reader. – Konrad Rudolph Oct 25 '18 at 13:37
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Simply write the new entries as you create them.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $infile = $ARGV[0];
open my $IN, '<', $infile or die "Could not open $infile: $!, $?";
my $outfile = 'output';
open my $OUT, '>', $outfile or die "Could not open $outfile: $!, $?";  # overwrites the file $outfile;

my $seqid = 1;

while (my $line = <$IN>) {
     if ($line =~ /^>(.+)/) {
        print $OUT "Seq$seqid\t$1\n"
        print ">Seq$seqid\n";
        $seqid++
     } else {
        print $line;
     }
}

I tried to fix the indentation but left the gratutious variable for the $OUT file name.

If you want to keep the mapping in memory for other reasons (maybe to develop this into a much more complex script) using an array instead of a hash would seem like a natural way to keep the entries sorted; the new label is trivially derivable from the array index.

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